PDA

View Full Version : TUIFly - it had to come


judge11
6th Jun 2020, 14:28
From today's Daily Telegraph Travel news:

'TUIfly, the airline of Europe's biggest tour operator, TUI, is seeking to cut 1,000 jobs as part of a plan to halve its fleet, Reuters is reporting. The layoffs will include cutting 270 pilots, around 430 cabin crew, 190 technicians and 100 employees in administrative roles, sources told the news agency. TUIfly has around 2,000 staff at present.

A spokesman for TUIfly said current market conditions only support the need for around only half of TUIflyís 39 Boeing 737 aircraft.'

Which just leaves those in the rarified atmosphere of L(B)a L(B)a Land to declare.

macdo
6th Jun 2020, 15:22
This was from a report in the German press, re-reported by Bloomberg and now onto the Telegraph. If you read the German original the article only reports on affected German units and bases. It may well be that more will come, but don't be hasty precious!

Mr Good Cat
6th Jun 2020, 19:35
A spokesman for TUIfly said current market conditions only support the need for around only half of TUIflyís 39 Boeing 737 aircraft.'


And the leisure market conditions for August to October may support a hell of a lot more than half the fleet. Next year may even support all of the current fleet, such is the potential for the recovery of the short-haul leisure sector.

Sounds like a fire and re-hire, smash and grab.

hec7or
6th Jun 2020, 19:41
As Macdo said, TUIfly is the German part of the TUI group, the UK arm I believe is TUI Airways

Yeehaw22
6th Jun 2020, 20:00
I suspect the loss of the euro wings wet lease work will be playing a fairly big part in this reduction.

DooblerChina
6th Jun 2020, 21:20
TUIfly is an odd outfit that has done lots of domestic work on behalf of a few carriers. The management has been complaining about market saturation in Germany for ages. They were going to expand recently as they thought Condor was a gonner but I believe itís been bankrolled for a bit longer.

Itís a crying shame either way.

No plans for redundancies yet in the U.K.

Anti Skid On
7th Jun 2020, 00:31
And the leisure market conditions for August to October may support a hell of a lot more than half the fleet. Next year may even support all of the current fleet, such is the potential for the recovery of the short-haul leisure sector.

Sounds like a fire and re-hire, smash and grab.

In the first bit, you sound like the world's biggest optimist, but then switch to being a pessimist. Leisure travel will be a no-go with any additional COVID outbreaks

Mr Good Cat
7th Jun 2020, 19:46
In the first bit, you sound like the world's biggest optimist, but then switch to being a pessimist. Leisure travel will be a no-go with any additional COVID outbreaks

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/473x1024/433191e1_b00e_4b27_a732_303fb17b8db2_c3c76dd38eae14c6673fb26 046a10a9a59a90192.jpg
Following the EU's intra agreements. June 28th is pretty early.

I think it's too late to go back into a lockdown for most countries. The money has run out and the economy is starting to dictate things (look at Spain and Italy). In the UK particularly, a large proportion of the population will refuse (and already is refusing) to comply with restrictions. Partly due to the Cummings fiasco and partly due to the fact that they've witnessed the BLM protests go uninterrupted and unenforced.

I'm not being blindly optimistic, merely observing behaviour. Look at the Austrian tourists who have just bypassed border restrictions by using Switzerland to get to the Italian beaches!

PilotLZ
7th Jun 2020, 21:43
Either alternative will involve loads of collateral damage at this stage. It's an almost impossible balance between contagion, social unrest, mass unemployment with even greater unrest, lack of means to pick up whatever's left of the economy by the time the dreaded lurgy is over and whatnot else. So, the least damaging scenario seems to be to try and put together some semblance of normality by July. Whoever's taking reasonable care of themselves and their nearest and dearest now will be doing the same in a month's time. Whoever's not will find a way to do their own thing even under a strict lockdown. Were all those mass gatherings totally legal and appropriate under the circumstances? I bet not, but that didn't stop the crowds from attending. So, there's hardly any point in doing further damage by restrictions which can no longer be imposed in a non-forceful manner.