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SAPEG3T
3rd Apr 2020, 13:57
https://www.caa.co.uk/uploadedFiles/CAA/Content/Related_Information/Our_work/CAA%20Prosecutions%202018-2019.pdf


Just seen this. What are all your thoughts? Seems steep for the medical related ones!

Professor Plum
3rd Apr 2020, 14:50
I don't personally think the medical related ones are steep.

For both - the defendants went a significant number of years without disclosing medical information which would have certainly been of interest to the AME.

In one instance, someone went through four class 2 medical examinations without disclosing heart surgery - (!!!) and flew over 100 hrs. What if he'd become incapacitated and killed his passengers an/or people on the ground?

In another - an 8 year undisclosed history of depression / medication for it, in relation to a class 1 medical. Parallels with German wings crash??

I get someone may "forget" to disclose something - but repeated forgetting of medical information which will clearly be of interest to an AME I find very hard to justify.

Just my two cents!

VariablePitchP
3rd Apr 2020, 14:56
https://www.caa.co.uk/uploadedFiles/CAA/Content/Related_Information/Our_work/CAA%20Prosecutions%202018-2019.pdf


Just seen this. What are all your thoughts? Seems steep for the medical related ones!

Serves as a proper deterrent, £50 fine and a telling off is not enough to stop someone trying to lie in order to get a medical.

Also should hopefully make the other numpties think twice before flying like an idiot.

NorvernSuvna
3rd Apr 2020, 15:06
Good post, I suppose those fines for the medical offences are there for a reason, perhaps to discourage pilots from denying their true situation ? The geyser having joy rides within the Luton TMA should have had his licence revoked IMHO !

Herod
3rd Apr 2020, 15:47
Couldn't agree more. I lost my licence through a nervous breakdown, which resulted in having to take anti-depressants. The then CAA Medical Branch outlined the process to get the licence back. It would have been quite a long (and expensive) process to regain and, since I was only two years to pension, I gave it a miss. Flying under that sort of medication, or worse, flying with that condition and no medication, is dangerous.

Professor Plum
3rd Apr 2020, 15:55
Herod - It's good to know that there's a process by which you can get a medical back in those circumstances.


Hope you're safe and well now.

SanHor
3rd Apr 2020, 16:21
Why with full names? Little bit of privacy?

Nightstop
3rd Apr 2020, 16:31
Declaring any medical condition to your AME is not only a legal requirement but can actually be of benefit to yourself. In my case, at age 42 I had a heart attack. Two NHS Consultants advised that invasive surgery was unnecessary (for the time being) and wouldnít approve it for socio-economic reasons alone i.e. return to work, as an Airline Pilot. The CAA Medical Branch however were more helpful and referred me to Dr Webb Peploe (Consultant Cardiologist to the CAA, at the time). Dr Webb Peploe disagreed with the NHS and following angiograms etc referred me to Mr Chris Young for open heart surgery. As a result, for 23 years thereafter I have successfully passed every CAA medical test requirement and am about to retire in good health (albeit with some internal cardiac plumbing adjustments). Thank you CAA, without whom I may not have completed my career or indeed been here today!

Herod
3rd Apr 2020, 16:51
Professor Plum. Yes, thank you; safe and well. As the CAA doctor said "We're not slamming the door; we're closing it gently". There are ways back from lots of things; for me it was a case of a year or so, then obviously lapsed ratings etc, so not economically worth it. However, for someone younger, yes.

Captain-Random
3rd Apr 2020, 20:04
Google some of the same same youíll see a history of reckless behaviour/ illegal operations

Why they still have licences is beyond me. $$$$

VariablePitchP
3rd Apr 2020, 20:07
Why with full names? Little bit of privacy?

No difference with people charged with Ďnormalí crimes.

If you donít want to be publicly named then donít commit criminal behaviour, very simple. Thatís before you think of it as another deterrent.

megan
4th Apr 2020, 03:08
Flying under that sort of medication, or worse, flying with that condition and no medication, is dangerousDepending on the jurisdiction under which you operate, some authorities permit flying while taking anti-depressants, even at the ATPL level, Oz is one. Of course it will be on a case by case basis.

29_Grass
4th Apr 2020, 19:16
Google some of the same same youíll see a history of reckless behaviour/ illegal operations

Why they still have licences is beyond me. $$$$

A celebrity or two on there, at least they're not up before the beak for hooky charter (this time) :}