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Council Van
15th Feb 2020, 20:29
Not a lot of information in the article but this caught my attention. Apparently an Air India Airbus crew met a Jeep on take off and as result had a tail strike due to early rotation.

https://www.aviation24.be/airlines/air-india/airbus-a321-meets-jeep-on-runway-during-take-off-roll-early-rotation-and-tail-scrape/

JanetFlight
15th Feb 2020, 21:55
Av Link here :)

Accident: India A321 at Pune on Feb 15th 2020, tail strike because of runway incursion (http://avherald.com/h?article=4d35c152&opt=0)

mattler
16th Feb 2020, 08:18
I love that they nearly had a complete write off, saved the day by banging the tail and probably triggering alpha prot, then proceeded to their destination like it was nothing. Haven't seen that kind of can do attitude since I worked in the Arctic.
At least their pants would have been dry by the time they stepped off the aircraft and into the limelight. :ugh::D​​​​​​

fdr
16th Feb 2020, 10:37
At least their pants would have been dry by the time they stepped off the aircraft and into the limelight. :ugh::D​​​​​​

but smelly

compressor stall
16th Feb 2020, 12:15
Itís entirely probable that given the focus on the Jeep and missing it, that they never heard the tail hit.

Not uncommon to have a singular focus in a time of startle and surprise that blocks out other information.

nicolai
16th Feb 2020, 13:28
Is there any warning in the cockpit (either direct impact sensor or something like measured pitch angle and known geometry) of "likely tail strike" in the A321 cockpit?

Synth voice "THAT WON'T JUST BUFF OUT!" ? :)

iggy
16th Feb 2020, 13:34
I love that they nearly had a complete write off, saved the day by banging the tail and probably triggering alpha prot, then proceeded to their destination like it was nothing. Haven't seen that kind of can do attitude since I worked in the Arctic.
At least their pants would have been dry by the time they stepped off the aircraft and into the limelight. :ugh::D​​​​​​
We recently had a 737 on Europe flying on single engine for much much longer than the approved diversion time, no need to go to the Arctic to see attitudes. :ouch:

vilas
16th Feb 2020, 17:25
Tail strike is always heard at the back by cabin crew and passengers. They bring it to the notice of cockpit crew. As per procedure they should have landed back without pressurising. Even a year back at Trichy in another incident aircraft hit the boundary wall on take off and with much more damage flew three hours at 370.