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Back door
29th Jun 2019, 15:05
https://www.google.ca/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/newark-airport-emergency-closed-landing-2019-6

anyone with more details ?

Hotel Tango
29th Jun 2019, 15:43
I think the article pretty well covers it. What more do you need?

Airbubba
29th Jun 2019, 15:47
United 2098 LGA-IAH diverted to EWR landing at about 1228Z.

The plane appears to have gone off the right side of the runway.

From local news WABC:

Plane flying from LaGuardia to Houston makes emergency landing at Newark
Updated an hour agoNEWARK, New Jersey (WABC) -- An airplane flying from LaGuardia Airport to Houston, Texas, made an emergency landing at Newark International Airport after the plane experienced a brake problem, the FAA confirmed.

United Airlines flight 2098, an Airbus A320, landed on Runway 22L around 8:46 a.m. [actually N837UA, an A319 landing at 8:28 am - Airbubba] Saturday, and the two left main tires blew when landing. The plane also experienced "other structural damage," according to Port Authority.

Passengers were deplaned via slides, according to the FAA, but the number of passengers aboard the plane is unknown. They were taken by bus to Terminal C.

United spokesperson said in a statement that the plane experienced a "mechanical issue upon take-off."

"Our pilots reacted quickly to ensure the safety of the aircraft and our customers," the statement read.

At the time, all arrivals and departures were canceled but have since resumed, the airport tweeted. Travelers should expect delays.

United said there were no reported injuries, but Port Authority said a few minor injuries were reported.

The FAA is investigating the incident.

United said it is making arraignments [sic] [to] get customers to their final destination.

Just last weekend, United Airlines Flight 627 partially skidded off the runway at Newark Airport (left=https://abc7ny.com/plane-landing-in-newark-blows-tires-skids-off-runway/5348199/), temporarily shutting down the airport. The plane also had tired [sic] issues during landing.



https://abc7ny.com/plane-makes-emergency-landing-at-newark-airport/5370975/ (https://abc7ny.com/plane-makes-emergency-landing-at-newark-airport/5370975/)

SeenItAll
29th Jun 2019, 15:51
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/927x831/lgaiah_583cc29b162881753a3c86b0038bed60d545efb7.png

FIRESYSOK
29th Jun 2019, 16:32
Why wouldnít they put it into JFK or SWF? Of course itís more convenient for maintenance, but they effectively shut their hub and inconvenienced many more flights. And a full evac. Interesting.

Lake1952
29th Jun 2019, 17:23
Why wouldnít they put it into JFK or SWF? Of course itís more convenient for maintenance, but they effectively shut their hub and inconvenienced many more flights. And a full evac. Interesting.

The sole responsibility of this crew was to get this plane safely on the ground and not to be concerned about the effects on the schedule at EWR.

FIRESYSOK
29th Jun 2019, 17:32
The sole responsibility of this crew was to get this plane safely on the ground and not to be concerned about the effects on the schedule at EWR.

Iím so glad you were here to clear that up. Actually, thatís the job of their operational control center. All things being equal, they kind of hosed their hub when an equally suitable airport was available.

Pistonprop
29th Jun 2019, 18:04
Actually, thatís the job of their operational control center.

Really? So you are saying that in an emergency the Captain has no say in where they divert to?

mustangsally
29th Jun 2019, 20:53
A question, what was the urgency to get the aircraft on the ground with a known brake problem? Was it pissing hydraulic fluid? What created this need? If the gear is up, why not continue on to Houston? Houston has some mighty long runways and the weight would be much lighter.

On who controls United diversions, maybe twenty years ago or so, the Captain lost the say in were to take a broken jet. I don't recall all the facts, but it had something to do with a DC-8 that ran out of fuel trying to land at Portland, Or. Maybe some of you historic accident with knowledge could comment.

yoko1
29th Jun 2019, 21:07
The reports indicate that there was a tire failure on takeoff with subsequent smoke and fumes entering the cabin. Now, those smoke and fumes could have been relatively harmless aftereffects of the blown tires or it could have been the beginning of an uncontained fire in the wheel well. The aircraft was evacuated after landing using the slides, so that gives you an idea of how serious they considered the problem. Once there is a hint of an uncontrolled fire, the number one job of the crew was to get the aircraft on the ground as quickly and safely as possible, and any inconvenience to the airport should not have even entered their minds.

Airbubba
29th Jun 2019, 21:31
Listening to the tapes, UA2098 told departure that they had a 'hydraulic issue', they were declaring an emergency and the new destination was EWR. No mention of a possible tire burst on takeoff, you would think that LGA would want to check for FOD on the runway perhaps? Do UA A319's have brake temps or tire pressure indications? On widebodies these usually give you an indication of a blown tire in my experience.

25,000 pounds of fuel, 133 POB's, they were given immediate vectors for the ILS 22L but needed more time to 'troubleshoot' so they took vectors for another try. Tower asked if they anticipated any difficulty exiting the runway, UA2098 said no but they wanted the trucks standing by just in case. After UA2098 went off the side of the runway, the airport was closed, all aircraft hold position and monitor the radio.

capngrog
29th Jun 2019, 21:31
What I find puzzling about these reports is that no condition worthy of an emergency evacuation of the aircraft has been cited. The emergency (slide) evacuation of an aircraft almost always involves injuries to a varying degree and is not ordered unless the cause of the emergency landing is still developing/worsening. The only thing I can think of that would warrant an emergency evacuation of a safely landed and stopped aircraft would be the threat of fire. The responding airport fire commander is key to assessing the situation regarding the exterior of the aircraft and conveying his/her observations to the aircraft's captain for the captain's decision on whether or not to evacuate.

By the way, the United DC-8 crash in Oregon that you mentioned occurred in December of 1978. That was UAL 173 that ran out of fuel after stooging around the Portland area for more than an hour, while the flight crew attempted to diagnose a problem with the landing gear. The captain became fixated on the landing gear problem and ignored or discounted numerous remarks from his First Officer and Flight Engineer (remember flight engineers?) concerning their deteriorating fuel state. Of 189 souls on board, it was miraculous that "only" 10 died during a nighttime deadstick landing in a built up suburban area (the plane narrowly missed a multi-story apartment building as I recall). This was one of the many accidents that lead to the development of Cockpit Resource Management (now called Crew Resource Management) programs. The irony of this accident was that, while not showing "three green", the gear was actually down and locked.

Cheers,
Grog

towrope
29th Jun 2019, 22:07
I was on that flight. I was sorely tempted to go up (from NorCal) to Portland for the 40th this past December but chickened out. My recollections are few - I was in seat 33F (?) or whatever was 2 from the last row. By the time the fuel issue surfaced (engines quitting) we were on approach and there had already been preparations in the cabin for the landing gear not down. After the lights went out the only noise I remember was the FAs all shouting the crash lines they were taught. There were bright blue-green flashes when we went through the power lines and in the flashes I remember seeing seats and insulation coming towards me (although it was a plane length away it seemed right in front of me). No assistance by UA then or later, no apology nor any contact ever came but my suitcase did arrive at home in Hawaii a month later by taxi, smashed flat and in a heavy clear plastic bag. That was my last flight on UA in fact.

DaveReidUK
29th Jun 2019, 22:55
On who controls United diversions, maybe twenty years ago or so, the Captain lost the say in were to take a broken jet. I don't recall all the facts, but it had something to do with a DC-8 that ran out of fuel trying to land at Portland, Or. Maybe some of you historic accident with knowledge could comment.

UA173 came down on approach to 28L at Portland. PDX was the intended destination of the flight, and there's no suggestion in the report that the Captain had expressed a wish to land elsewhere and had been overruled by UA Ops.

I'd be surprised if they did today either.

Rick777
29th Jun 2019, 23:21
The captain controls where a UAL aircraft with emergency diverts. Operations makes suggestions. For weather diverts it's different. Operations tells you where to go, but you can always refuse. I only had one emergency diversion at United. I told ops where I was going. They suggested somewhere else. I refused and labded where I wanted. I couple of months later my boss called me up and said someone had a complaint about what I did andm he had to pretend to investigate. I explained my position, and he said OK, and that was then last I heard of it.

cappt
30th Jun 2019, 01:59
I was on that flight. I was sorely tempted to go up (from NorCal) to Portland for the 40th this past December but chickened out. My recollections are few - I was in seat 33F (?) or whatever was 2 from the last row. By the time the fuel issue surfaced (engines quitting) we were on approach and there had already been preparations in the cabin for the landing gear not down. After the lights went out the only noise I remember was the FAs all shouting the crash lines they were taught. There were bright blue-green flashes when we went through the power lines and in the flashes I remember seeing seats and insulation coming towards me (although it was a plane length away it seemed right in front of me). No assistance by UA then or later, no apology nor any contact ever came but my suitcase did arrive at home in Hawaii a month later by taxi, smashed flat and in a heavy clear plastic bag. That was my last flight on UA in fact.

Very interesting, thanks for sharing.

WingNut60
30th Jun 2019, 02:00
I think the article pretty well covers it. What more do you need?

I'd be interested to see how much hand-carry came off during the evac.
Surely in a civilised, compliant, western country that would be "none"?

Smythe
30th Jun 2019, 02:18
I'd be interested to see how much hand-carry came off during the evac.

Really, why?

Bend alot
30th Jun 2019, 02:55
Really, why?
Given they were not thrown into an emergency, the crew should have be able to stress the "leave the baggage behind" before landing.

So yes it would be interesting.

SeenItAll
30th Jun 2019, 03:14
I find the questioning of why the pilot didn't choose to divert to JFK or SWF in order to avoid hosing a UA hub to be unbelievable. First, the pilot may not have anticipated that the landing would cause any runway damage -- but even this in immaterial and probably never crossed the pilot's mind. Because EWR is a UA hub, the pilot probably has lots of experience landing there. UA doesn't fly at all to SWF or anymore to JFK; so both of these airports would be unknowns (or at least unfamiliars). C'mon guys, if you are doing an emergency divert, it is for safety reasons -- and being familiar with landing at a particular airport is a big boost to safety.

West Coast
30th Jun 2019, 04:00
Iím so glad you were here to clear that up. Actually, thatís the job of their operational control center. All things being equal, they kind of hosed their hub when an equally suitable airport was available.

Did you poorly phrase that or do you truly think the OCC makes that call?

hans brinker
30th Jun 2019, 04:20
I think the article pretty well covers it. What more do you need?

The crew reported that they were expecting to vacate the runway normally, but ended up in the grass.
There was an emergency evacuation, but no indication of an immediate hazard to the pax on the plane.

surely those could be answered by you?

FIRESYSOK
30th Jun 2019, 06:21
Did you poorly phrase that or do you truly think the OCC makes that call?


Been there; itís not as straightforward as I suggested. Of course final decision is with the crew. OCC doesnít have all the info. EWR is just short on real estateó that was my point. All in all a good outcome

ThreeThreeMike
30th Jun 2019, 06:49
While it quickly became obvious there wasn't a fire, the actions the crew took properly ignored any consideration of inconvenience to flight ops at EWR. I'm surprised by the comments criticizing the their decisions.

gearlever
30th Jun 2019, 10:18
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/403x537/un_6894f2daf38d0cf2bb313de83912ee5dbfe0fcff.jpg
LH MLG

neilki
30th Jun 2019, 17:20
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/403x537/un_6894f2daf38d0cf2bb313de83912ee5dbfe0fcff.jpg
LH MLG
Newark is home for UA. Itís a sensible place to head for. LAND ASAP in Red on the bus means exactly that. If thereís time you can advise the SoC. Or head for a river if thatís the best option 🤓
also; the brake pins look fine to me; walk around complete..

Joe le Taxi
30th Jun 2019, 19:32
walk around complete. Well, I dunno; I think I can see a slight flat spot on the left mains.

PerPurumTonantes
30th Jun 2019, 20:44
walk around complete..
Found their hydraulics leak :ok:

West Coast
30th Jun 2019, 23:27
Been there; itís not as straightforward as I suggested. Of course final decision is with the crew. OCC doesnít have all the info. EWR is just short on real estateó that was my point. All in all a good outcome

More inline with the way it works and a far cry from your original post.

fotoguzzi
1st Jul 2019, 00:35
Is there a correlation between a[n] hydraulic leak and a pair of wheels that refuse to turn?

Bob Viking
1st Jul 2019, 05:30
I know itís blatant thread drift but it is amazing to have a first hand account from someone who was actually onboard an aircraft that suffered a very serious accident.

Do you mind me asking how it affected your confidence in air travel afterwards?

Did it scar you forever or was it a case of Ďlightning doesnít strike twice in the same placeí?!

Did you forgive the crew (Captain) for what appeared to be a pretty poorly handled emergency?

Of course I understand if you donít wish to discuss it.

BV

PerPurumTonantes
1st Jul 2019, 12:31
VASAviation have put up their ATC and tracon sim of the event
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eI9TUpQlJJA