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TimmyTee
2nd Jun 2019, 03:52
As per title, reckon it's legit? (flight radar showing so from what I can tell)

Chris2303
2nd Jun 2019, 04:01
On the ground in YMML

PoppaJo
2nd Jun 2019, 06:08
Med diversion.

For once itís not these pieces of $hit going tech.

Tankengine
2nd Jun 2019, 06:15
Med diversion.

For once itís not these pieces of $hit going tech.

In my experience passengers are ďgoing techĒ more often than aiicraft.
Look at the newer ďno maintenance ď aircraft in service - they seem to have issues as well! ;)

ACMS
2nd Jun 2019, 07:42
7700 for a sick pax??????????

A/C in grave and imminent danger?????????

what.

roundsounds
2nd Jun 2019, 08:54
Med diversion.

For once itís not these pieces of $hit going tech.

what makes you say the B744 are pieces of crap?

mrdeux
2nd Jun 2019, 09:12
Have you actually flown a 747 ER? I guess not, as I’ve never heard a pilot describe an aircraft as ‘going tech’.

Ken Borough
2nd Jun 2019, 09:30
"going tech" is not an expression usually heard in Australia although it's a very common substitute for 'U/S' in the UK.

Wonderworld
2nd Jun 2019, 10:35
Med diversion.

For once itís not these pieces of $hit going tech.
Give me a 15 year old 744 any day.

dragon man
2nd Jun 2019, 10:39
Med diversion.

For once itís not these pieces of $hit going tech.

They are actually not pieces of crap they are aircraft like all aircraft that require maintenance and alas in Qantas they donít get enough of that due to not been on the ground long enough, inadequate spares and not enough engineers to fix them.

Capt Fathom
2nd Jun 2019, 10:57
Which has nothing to do with today’s medical diversion!

Beer Baron
2nd Jun 2019, 12:34
7700 for a sick pax??????????

A/C in grave and imminent danger?????????

what.

Where does it state anywhere that 7700 indicates ĎA/C in grave and imminent dangerí?

From Airservices Australia:

Pilots of aircraft encountering an emergency in flight, other than loss of two-way communications, should select code 7700

And this,

In the event of an in-flight emergency, pilots call Ďmaydayí or Ďpaní to air traffic control to alert controllers to the severity of the incident.
A Ďpaní call is used to describe a less urgent situation but one that still requires attention from air traffic control. Examples of Ďpaní situations include a passenger medical emergency or instrument malfunction.


Seems to me like a PAN and 7700 is entirely in order. Iím sure if it was your kid or parent dying on a plane youíd want the crew using every possible tactic available to them to get that plane on the ground as quickly and safely as possible.

PoppaJo
2nd Jun 2019, 14:40
what makes you say the B744 are pieces of crap?
Fly Singapore, Qatar, Etihad, Cathay, Emirates
heck even Delta or American and you will see how woeful the entire Qantas experience is these days, more specifically the 747.

I have arrived at the conclusion that Qantas Management and employees think the current product and service standard is world class. But then why are they fairly non existent outside of Sydney? The competitors most certainly have them by the balls and rightly so!

On an engineering front, well they cost 25-30% more to operate compared to a big twin which is why nobody else flies them anymore.

Recently a charter group wanted a big heavy for a global charter, and they wouldnít give QF the job until they refreshed the 747 Business cabin as they claimed it was prehistoric, so if your wondering why one bird has a more updated look.

roundsounds
2nd Jun 2019, 20:55
Fly Singapore, Qatar, Etihad, Cathay, Emirates
heck even Delta or American and you will see how woeful the entire Qantas experience is these days, more specifically the 747.

I have arrived at the conclusion that Qantas Management and employees think the current product and service standard is world class. But then why are they fairly non existent outside of Sydney? The competitors most certainly have them by the balls and rightly so!

On an engineering front, well they cost 25-30% more to operate compared to a big twin which is why nobody else flies them anymore.

Recently a charter group wanted a big heavy for a global charter, and they wouldnít give QF the job until they refreshed the 747 Business cabin as they claimed it was prehistoric, so if your wondering why one bird has a more updated look.
None of these comments support your assertion the B744 frequently ďgo techĒ. Who calls aircraft ďbirdsĒ ?

mrdeux
3rd Jun 2019, 00:55
"going tech" is not an expression usually heard in Australia although it's a very common substitute for 'U/S' in the UK.

Amongst pilots?

ACMS
3rd Jun 2019, 01:35
Where does it state anywhere that 7700 indicates ĎA/C in grave and imminent dangerí?

From Airservices Australia:

Pilots of aircraft encountering an emergency in flight, other than loss of two-way communications, should select code 7700

And this,

In the event of an in-flight emergency, pilots call Ďmaydayí or Ďpaní to air traffic control to alert controllers to the severity of the incident.
A Ďpaní call is used to describe a less urgent situation but one that still requires attention from air traffic control. Examples of Ďpaní situations include a passenger medical emergency or instrument malfunction.

Seems tome like a PAN and 7700 is entirely in order. Iím sure if it was your kid or parent dying on a plane youíd want the crew using every possible tactic available to them to get that plane on the ground as quickly and safely as possible.


fair enough but Iíve had many medical emergencies in flight requiring priority and we didnít set 7700.....or declare a PAN.
just seems a little over the top.

Transition Layer
3rd Jun 2019, 01:58
ACMS,

If you donít declare a PAN, ATC canít do anything to help you with track shortening, high speed, zero delays etc. They will tell you as such if youíre ever in the situation, but once you use the magic PAN word they can move everyone else out of the way.

Icarus2001
3rd Jun 2019, 02:01
BEER BARON...

In-flight emergencies | Airservices (http://www.airservicesaustralia.com/services/how-air-traffic-control-works/in-flight-emergencies/)

Right there.

"A ‘mayday’ call indicates an aircraft is in grave and imminent danger and requires immediate assistance. "

Capt Fathom
3rd Jun 2019, 02:11
How can an aircraft be in grave and imminent danger? Surely it is the occupants needing assistance!

ACMS
3rd Jun 2019, 03:06
ACMS,

If you don’t declare a PAN, ATC can’t do anything to help you with track shortening, high speed, zero delays etc. They will tell you as such if you’re ever in the situation, but once you use the magic PAN word they can move everyone else out of the way.






rubbish, I’ve had several medical emergencies both in Oz and overseas with diversions en route and at destination before, didn’t you read my post?

Simply declared a medical emergency, requested priority and it WAS DONE.
High speed direct number 1, all ok.

Keith Myath
3rd Jun 2019, 03:36
rubbish, Iíve had several medical emergencies both in Oz and overseas with diversions en route and at destination before, didnít you read my post?

Simply declared a medical emergency, requested priority and it WAS DONE.
High speed direct number 1, all ok.

Donít confuse Oz with the rest of the world. In this particular backwater, you can request medical priority until the cows come home, but it will make no difference until you pipe up with your Ďpaní call to the pedantís society (Australian ATC).

The rest of the world are unencumbered with this atom splitting approach, and allow a fair amount of common sense.

ACMS
3rd Jun 2019, 04:28
Donít confuse Oz with the rest of the world. In this particular backwater, you can request medical priority until the cows come home, but it will make no difference until you pipe up with your Ďpaní call to the pedantís society (Australian ATC).

The rest of the world are unencumbered with this atom splitting approach, and allow a fair amount of common sense.


ok, for the sake of the slow of reading in here Iíll state it again.

Iíve had medical emergencies in Oz and overseas..........etc etc.

One into Melb and I requested and was given priority.....As I was In ADL years ago.....

The last 2 in HKG.....same outcome.

Oz ATC arenít stupid when you say the words ďmedical emergencyĒ

Iím not saying itís wrong to say PAN PAN but Iím my experience if you donít it didnít matter. Ok.

over and out....

Beer Baron
3rd Jun 2019, 05:13
BEER BARON...

In-flight emergencies | Airservices (http://www.airservicesaustralia.com/services/how-air-traffic-control-works/in-flight-emergencies/)

Right there.

"A Ďmaydayí call indicates an aircraft is in grave and imminent danger and requires immediate assistance. "
Thanks for the capital letters Icarus2001. Now that you have my full attention can you indicate where anyone stated that they made a mayday call???

They apparently squawked 7700, that is not a mayday call. Go back and read the excerpts I posted and consider what my point was.

ringbinder
3rd Jun 2019, 05:30
"over and out...."

And the rest of your radio procedures ..................................???

ACMS
3rd Jun 2019, 06:51
And the rest of your radio procedures ..................................???

Unreadable, say again slowly.

Jay Arr
3rd Jun 2019, 10:59
To the Monday morning quarterbacks here: you ought to be aware that at least one of the pilots on this flight has read all your uninformed insights and opinions.

And if you were to actually speak to him about the events yesterday you might actually rethink what you've expressed from the safety of internet anonymity.

clark y
3rd Jun 2019, 12:51
How this medical was announced to the world is not really worth 2 pages of arguing. I'm sure ATC are smart enough to assist you if you tell them that you have a medical on board.

Declaring an emergency can also help with the little legalities ( for the CVR and tapes) of dumping 80,000kgs of fuel over Victoria or alternatively landing a tad overweight. I don't have the info as to which option was taken.

wiggy
3rd Jun 2019, 13:59
re the ”going tech” phrase and

Amongst pilots?..in Europe, well, certainly in the U.K., yes it is used.

Broadening the U.K. vs. Antipodes differences issues slightly...as a point of interest...inbound to the likes of LHR or LGW if you have a medical problem and want expedited handling and medical assistance on arrival ATC will politely “ask” you to declare an emergency politely, and politely “ask” you to squawk emergency, yes, 7700.

Icarus2001
3rd Jun 2019, 14:35
Thanks Beer Baron. I think it is important to look at the history of a Mayday and how 7700 follows. Many aviation standards are directly stolen from the maritime environment. Nav lights are an obvious one. Rules of giving way etc. A Mayday from a vessel indicates that the vessel is in distress, not a passenger on board. As for 7700, on its own, if used after a Mayday or PanPan call it would be redundant. The net result being that an alarm is triggered on the desk of the FIR Manager. Imagine a situation where voice coms are lost then a received 7700 squawk would initially be interpreted as a Mayday, perhaps downgraded to Pan after further information is received somehow. From this extrapolation 7700 seems a strong response to an unwell passenger.
I have had a few unwell passengers on my flights and of course we do everything we can for them, diverting for quicker medical care etc but for the most part luck plays the biggest part. If you have a stroke or serious heart attack between Melbourne and Darwin your chances of a good outcome are low. I have two friends who work in emergency medicine, one as an AO and their tales are sobering.
Notwithstanding all of that, if the PIC wishes to squawk 7700 that is their prerogative. Once alerted ATC can easily ask them to return to their code.

das Uber Soldat
3rd Jun 2019, 23:50
And you wonder why they call us 'Ozstranaughts' overseas. A bunch of nitwits have found yet another utterly pointless thing to bicker about, replete with underlined and bolded copy-pasted regs references no less!

To the Monday morning quarterbacks here: you ought to be aware that at least one of the pilots on this flight has read all your uninformed insights and opinions.
If that pilot came here expecting anything other than abject stupidity then he's ever dumber than the people posting.

I blame you for this J3pipercub.

CaptCloudbuster
4th Jun 2019, 05:49
Medical Emergency

5.5.1 A pilot that is not engaged in the transport of patients under HOSP or MEDEVAC operations, should notify ATC of an on board medical emergency by declaring a PAN and appending the words ĎMEDICAL PRIORITY REQUIRED'. The pilot should specify any service attendance requirements such as RFFS. ATC will provide the flight with MEDEVAC priority but will not arrange an ambulance or activate aerodrome emergency procedures unless requested. Declaring a medical emergency does not satisfy the biosecurity pre-reporting requirements specified in GEN 1.3.

neville_nobody
4th Jun 2019, 06:06
I think there was a rule change on this in the last year with you now needing a Pan to get priority as shown above. If you make it a Mayday you will have the full emergency response with all the roads blocked and Hospitals on standby etc etc
You will definately make the front page of the paper if you did that in Sydney at peak hour on a Friday afternoon .

PoppaJo
4th Jun 2019, 06:37
I think there was a rule change on this in the last year with you now needing a Pan to get priority as shown above. If you make it a Mayday you will have the full emergency response with all the roads blocked and Hospitals on standby etc etc
You will definately make the front page of the paper if you did that in Sydney at peak hour on a Friday afternoon .
Any 7700 will make the news these days.

This was already being reported across the web whilst abeam Tasmania, and media crews were all in place at Tullamarine before it even landed.

Flightradar24 and LiveATC gives you a front row seat these days.

morno
4th Jun 2019, 09:28
And you wonder why they call us 'Ozstranaughts' overseas. A bunch of nitwits have found yet another utterly pointless thing to bicker about, replete with underlined and bolded copy-pasted regs references no less!.

Iíve worked overseas where Iíve been called an Austranaut. I wear it with pride when those who are calling us that, are the same ones who donít even know basic rules to stop them from killing people. Until someone can show me what is wrong with knowing your stuff, Iíll continue to think less of those who have NFI.

das Uber Soldat
5th Jun 2019, 00:26
Iíve worked overseas where Iíve been called an Austranaut. I wear it with pride when those who are calling us that, are the same ones who donít even know basic rules to stop them from killing people. Until someone can show me what is wrong with knowing your stuff, Iíll continue to think less of those who have NFI.
Thats it mate, couldn't agree more. God knows all those guys operating safely in Europe and the US with nothing like the severe weather and terrain we have here, just don't cut the mustard compared to the elite aviators we build locally, able to bicker and sternly lecture each other at a moments notice about in no way irrelevant tripe such as the precise wording of the regs in relation to the appropriate moment to squawk emergency in a medical.

Can you believe some of these guys operating overseas don't even know how many rivets their plane has? Talk about a ticking timebomb of ignorance.

morno
5th Jun 2019, 07:09
Thats it mate, couldn't agree more. God knows all those guys operating safely in Europe and the US with nothing like the severe weather and terrain we have here, just don't cut the mustard compared to the elite aviators we build locally, able to bicker and sternly lecture each other at a moments notice about in no way irrelevant tripe such as the precise wording of the regs in relation to the appropriate moment to squawk emergency in a medical.

Can you believe some of these guys operating overseas don't even know how many rivets their plane has? Talk about a ticking timebomb of ignorance.

What a numbnut you are. Iím not talking about knowing how many f**king rivets the aircraft has! Iím talking about pilots who donít even know the requirements for descent below MSA in IMC or Night. Basic shit which people get called Austronauts for but will keep you alive :ugh:. I have had pilots overseas tell me that itís ďfine, donít worry about it, I know weíre over waterĒ 😐.

I still donít see what is wrong with having a thorough understanding of the rules and having a thorough knowledge of your aircraft to be able to operate it efficiently.

Lambswool
5th Jun 2019, 08:07
I blame you for this J3pipercub.

Why blame J3?.

sms777
5th Jun 2019, 10:02
Why blame J3?.

J3 is his nemesis....

willadvise
6th Jun 2019, 01:53
Donít confuse Oz with the rest of the world. In this particular backwater, you can request medical priority until the cows come home, but it will make no difference until you pipe up with your Ďpaní call to the pedantís society (Australian ATC).

The rest of the world are unencumbered with this atom splitting approach, and allow a fair amount of common sense.

A little history for this one. Australia used to have MED1 and MED2 categories. If pilot called with a medical emergency we would simply put a MED1 in the label and the flight data record and you would get priority. A few years back they powers that be realised this was not consistent with ICAO so it was changed to MEDEVAC and HOSP categories. We continued to treat pilot declared medical emergencies as before by putting MEDEVAC in the flight data record and giving you priority. A little while latter the powers that be, came to release that this was not appropriate as it doesn't meet the definitions of a MEDEVAC flight so we were told that you have to get the pilots to call PAN before any priority could be given. We were told that this is how it happens in the rest of the world. This is where we are today. I had hoped that after a little while of "incidents" appearing in the news etc, and the bullshit of having to ask the "PAN declared checklist questions", that sanity would prevail and the airlines ask for it to be changed back to something sensible.

So Keith, I find you calling Australian ATC "the pedants society" offensive in the extreme. I don't get to choose which rules I comply with. Every thing I say, click on the computer, and write down is recorded and can be used against me. Can you please let me know which rules you disregard and which airline you fly for so I can avoid it in the future.

Regards
Will

ozaggie
8th Jun 2019, 10:11
Why oh why, do we not have a “like” button?

das Uber Soldat
9th Jun 2019, 01:58
J3 is his nemesis....
I heard the top shelf at the supermarket is his though.....
:E

Sorry, better get back to counting the rivets on the 320...

Keith Myath
9th Jun 2019, 02:39
A little history for this one. Australia used to have MED1 and MED2 categories. If pilot called with a medical emergency we would simply put a MED1 in the label and the flight data record and you would get priority. A few years back they powers that be realised this was not consistent with ICAO so it was changed to MEDEVAC and HOSP categories. We continued to treat pilot declared medical emergencies as before by putting MEDEVAC in the flight data record and giving you priority. A little while latter the powers that be, came to release that this was not appropriate as it doesn't meet the definitions of a MEDEVAC flight so we were told that you have to get the pilots to call PAN before any priority could be given. We were told that this is how it happens in the rest of the world. This is where we are today. I had hoped that after a little while of "incidents" appearing in the news etc, and the bullshit of having to ask the "PAN declared checklist questions", that sanity would prevail and the airlines ask for it to be changed back to something sensible.

So Keith, I find you calling Australian ATC "the pedants society" offensive in the extreme. I don't get to choose which rules I comply with. Every thing I say, click on the computer, and write down is recorded and can be used against me. Can you please let me know which rules you disregard and which airline you fly for so I can avoid it in the future.

Regards
Will

Hi Will

Iím not sure if youíre serious or feigning indignation. I wasnít having a personal go at any one controller, I understand the rules are set far higher up than the coal face Ė so donít take the pedantís society comment personally, itís more of a go at the general nature of the ATC rules in Australia.

Anyhow, thank you for aptly confirming my assertion that in Australia, you cannot declare medical priority on airline operations without a pan call.

Donít worry, Iíll blithely comply with all the unique readback requirements (decend via star Ė for the 14th time, leaving FL xxx), and wear my high vis vest, have three points of contact while ascending or descending stairs, make sure my ASIC is not upside down, and all those other important rules that I donít know how other countries survive without...

morno
9th Jun 2019, 04:15
Hi Will

Iím not sure if youíre serious or feigning indignation. I wasnít having a personal go at any one controller, I understand the rules are set far higher up than the coal face Ė so donít take the pedantís society comment personally, itís more of a go at the general nature of the ATC rules in Australia.

Anyhow, thank you for aptly confirming my assertion that in Australia, you cannot declare medical priority on airline operations without a pan call.

Donít worry, Iíll blithely comply with all the unique readback requirements (decend via star Ė for the 14th time, leaving FL xxx), and wear my high vis vest, have three points of contact while ascending or descending stairs, make sure my ASIC is not upside down, and all those other important rules that I donít know how other countries survive without...

Still waiting for you to tell us why itís such a bad thing to be knowledgeable about what we do.

Capn Rex Havoc
9th Jun 2019, 09:22
Willadvise-

im sorry but I have to recount an incident that happened quite some years ago. I was flying to Sydney from Dubai, and overhead a singapore airlines flight call up and say in broken English that they have a passenger with a serious medical condition and that they request priority. The ATCer said ďare you declaring a med1 or Med2 ?Ē He had no idea what the hell that was and said, ďI donít know request priorityĒ Atc asked the same stupid thing again, he said ď donít know the passenger is having heart attackĒ I got on the radio and said ď he is declaring a Med 1Ē Atc then acknowledged the Med 1 and gave him priority. Myself and the 3 other crew were disgusted with the PENDANTIC attitude of the aussie controllers. I was embarrassed to be an aussie on that flight deck that day.

V-Jet
9th Jun 2019, 10:52
Why oh why, do we not have a “like” button?

In -some- defence of Aust ATC, they are actually existing inside the bizarre and 'super safe' world of Australia. If you live outside our wonderful country, be aware we have no direct neighbours, you are a mass murderer if you drive at 61KM/h (not miles) in a 60 zone, aren't allowed to drink at night, can't smoke in public places, must swim between flags, aren't allowed to have a swimming pool without military spec gates between a dwelling and the pool and amongst MANY other issues, you certainly aren't allowed to build a home near a tree (lest there be wind, leaves or fire).

If you exist in that environment, then simple practicalities of 'someone's having a heart attack' really strike at the heart of your very existence. Heresy such as that (in extreme circumstances admittedly) might lead to someone being allowed to cross the road without assistance or maybe have an extra sharp corner on their desk without a yellow sticker!

I find Australia obscenely left leaning and sooner or later will become a victim of it's own success in championing a safety industry hell bent on saving the last person on the planet from so much as a vicious paper cut.

If you think the pilots and ATC from the country are painful to deal with - ask yourself in light of my comments above why that may be the case.

I personally believe it's because Australia is just way too far away from any other country to realise how far away they are. Economically, it is going to hurt - sooner or later the truth will be brought home. In the mean time, I feel like I live in a bizarre freedom-less jail like environment where breathing suddenly may break some rule that will land me in a local lock up at Maj's pleasure.

777Nine
9th Jun 2019, 11:43
In -some- defence of Aust ATC, they are actually existing inside the bizarre and 'super safe' world of Australia. If you live outside our wonderful country, be aware we have no direct neighbours, you are a mass murderer if you drive at 61KM/h (not miles) in a 60 zone, aren't allowed to drink at night, can't smoke in public places, must swim between flags, aren't allowed to have a swimming pool without military spec gates between a dwelling and the pool and amongst MANY other issues, you certainly aren't allowed to build a home near a tree (lest there be wind, leaves or fire).

If you exist in that environment, then simple practicalities of 'someone's having a heart attack' really strike at the heart of your very existence. Heresy such as that (in extreme circumstances admittedly) might lead to someone being allowed to cross the road without assistance or maybe have an extra sharp corner on their desk without a yellow sticker!

I find Australia obscenely left leaning and sooner or later will become a victim of it's own success in championing a safety industry hell bent on saving the last person on the planet from so much as a vicious paper cut.

If you think the pilots and ATC from the country are painful to deal with - ask yourself in light of my comments above why that may be the case.

I personally believe it's because Australia is just way too far away from any other country to realise how far away they are. Economically, it is going to hurt - sooner or later the truth will be brought home. In the mean time, I feel like I live in a bizarre freedom-less jail like environment where breathing suddenly may break some rule that will land me in a local lock up at Maj's pleasure.

Spot on. This place is the nanny state through and through and is caught up in its own little bubble. Great country to live in, but they certainly know how to suck the fun out of life.

CaptainMidnight
10th Jun 2019, 02:23
I understand the rules are set far higher up than the coal face Ė so donít take the pedantís society comment personally, itís more of a go at the general nature of the ATC rules in Australia.FWIW the "rules" are actually almost all CASA's, specified in most cases in ATC documents word-for-word from the relevant CASA MOS.

morno
10th Jun 2019, 03:38
In -some- defence of Aust ATC, they are actually existing inside the bizarre and 'super safe' world of Australia. If you live outside our wonderful country, be aware we have no direct neighbours, you are a mass murderer if you drive at 61KM/h (not miles) in a 60 zone, aren't allowed to drink at night, can't smoke in public places, must swim between flags, aren't allowed to have a swimming pool without military spec gates between a dwelling and the pool and amongst MANY other issues, you certainly aren't allowed to builde a home near a tree (lest there be wind, leaves or fire).

If you exist in that environment, then simple practicalities of 'someone's having a heart attack' really strike at the heart of your very existence. Heresy such as that (in extreme circumstances admittedly) might lead to someone being allowed to cross the road without assistance or maybe have an extra sharp corner on their desk without a yellow sticker!

I find Australia obscenely left leaning and sooner or later will become a victim of it's own success in championing a safety industry hell bent on saving the last person on the planet from so much as a vicious paper cut.

If you think the pilots and ATC from the country are painful to deal with - ask yourself in light of my comments above why that may be the case.

I personally believe it's because Australia is just way too far away from any other country to realise how far away they are. Economically, it is going to hurt - sooner or later the truth will be brought home. In the mean time, I feel like I live in a bizarre freedom-less jail like environment where breathing suddenly may break some rule that will land me in a local lock up at Maj's pleasure.

Ohh please :rolleyes:. Iíve lived overseas and I can tell you that Iíd much rather be here than there. At least here my children can breath the air without fear of contracting respiratory problems. They can walk on the footpaths without the fear of being run over by a motorbike because they want to get around the traffic, and they can eat the food without having to worry about whether or not theyíll get food poisoning today.

Big picture people, big picture. If you want to go to the lawless, corrupt, dirty, backwards society that all our apparently inconvenient rules protect you from, I can send you the details.

In the meantime Iíll continue to be an Austronaut, because it keeps me from running into that hill over there.

V-Jet
10th Jun 2019, 05:03
So you don't drink at night, always wear a hat and yellow vest outside, believe all motor vehicles must be speed limited to 30km/h, never planned to build a house near a tree and I suspect you've never tried to build a swimming pool. You are also very happy to rely on Captain 'Honorary Austranaut' Havoc being in Australian airspace near you if you have a medical issue whilst paxing on a non-aussie carrier:):)

I'm about to write to CASA to suggest Captain 'Honorary Austranaut' Havoc must be available for ATC translation services on immediate contact to ALL non-Austranaut aircraft.

PS: Unsure of Austranaut spelling. I suspect AustrA would be correct, but please don't be offended, fine me or go all Alan Joyce on my Folau-like ass!

Capn Rex Havoc
10th Jun 2019, 08:50
VJET - I am definitely not in the Austranaut category,lol I didn't know what med 1 or 2 was either, ~I just felt sorry for the poor Sing crew and the dick ATCER who couldn't use a bit of flexibility and cut him some slack. But I am happy to provide my services for a very reasonable fee.

V-Jet
10th Jun 2019, 09:53
Two comments:

Only the true messiah denies his divinity
and: If it IS a reasonable fee, you arenít giving the problem your full attention and certainly wonít get the job! Get AWU/ISO 9000 training certified and the sky is not the limit....

The name is Porter
10th Jun 2019, 12:34
So Keith, I find you calling Australian ATC "the pedants society" offensive in the extreme. I don't get to choose which rules I comply with. Every thing I say, click on the computer, and write down is recorded and can be used against me. Can you please let me know which rules you disregard and which airline you fly for so I can avoid it in the future.

Keith, Australian ATC is full of this type, unable to decipher a message from a pilot who's first language is not English. The common sense solution is to declare the medical emergency for the operation concerned, put it in the label and go to the flow. I was willing to defend my actions 'because it was recorded and could have been used against me'

In the end I couldn't stand this garbage and left.

Regarding his or her last sentence (sanctimonious crap) reply to them with:

'Let me know which sectors you control, I can then avoid them when I have a medical emergency and my passenger won't die because you're too worried about being nailed for not responding in the 'ICAO way'

V-Jet
11th Jun 2019, 09:26
I DO understand there are two sides to the story (legislative/industrial bullying is one piece of the puzzle) but I STILL can't find that Like button...

Dark Knight
12th Jun 2019, 02:25
The answer is very obvious being there all the time: Boeing 747-800