PDA

View Full Version : NDB Approach Lateral Deviation


aviationluver
30th May 2018, 04:32
I'm reviewing aviation material. I was going over instrument appr. I was wondering in Europe and other parts of the world...what is considered being laterally off course for an NDB approach to where a go around would be necessary?

I can't remember what the answer is for in the states.

I was watching this video and the video seems to imply that 8 degrees or 10 degrees is considered out of bounds and would cause a need to go around during an NDB approach.

See time mark 32:14 of this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFaQvtDVxBs&index=10&list=PLcSoIFYnPOAg5vaK-C9ke-sJt2HlkRHWP

Your thoughts.

pineteam
30th May 2018, 05:45
5 degrees in our SOP which is ridiculously low considering how much the needle fluctuates in the real world. In the sim it's doable tho.

Capn Bloggs
30th May 2018, 06:00
Your regulator will dictate what is acceptable. For example (Australian AIP):

ENR 1.5 Section 1.21.2
Can't descend on Final until "established", defined as:
Note: “Established” means being within half full scale deflection for the ILS, VOR and GNSS, within 5 of the required bearing for the NDB, or within 2NM of the DME arc.

5 degrees in our SOP which is ridiculously low considering how much the needle fluctuates in the real world. In the sim it's doable tho,
Here here!

Feather44
30th May 2018, 07:04
The values shown on the tabular at 32:14 are the App Procedure DESIGN

If I'm not mistaking, for NDB/VOR App, a lateral deviation exceeding 5 calls for a GA

pineteam
30th May 2018, 11:19
Totally agree with you TangoAlphad.

Pugilistic Animus
31st May 2018, 07:25
With those dern NDBs one is constantly flying tiny S turns

Centaurus
1st Jun 2018, 01:28
Anecdotal evidence reveals the New Zealand CAA tolerance in their particular manual for a DME arc, is plus or minus 2.5 nm. That seems reasonable. Yet in flight tests, some Examiners/ ATO's fail a candidate if he is outside plus or minus 1.5 NM which is ridiculous. If true, each Examiner seems to have his own ideas..

aterpster
1st Jun 2018, 17:03
Anecdotal evidence reveals the New Zealand CAA tolerance in their particular manual for a DME arc, is plus or minus 2.5 nm. That seems reasonable. Yet in flight tests, some Examiners/ ATO's fail a candidate if he is outside plus or minus 1.5 NM which is ridiculous. If true, each Examiner seems to have his own ideas..
The FAA instrument rating standard for a DME arc is plus or minus 1.0 n.m.

Pugilistic Animus
4th Jun 2018, 06:48
Both DME ARC transitions and NDB approaches require a little bit of "Kentucky Windage"