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GSLOC
16th Aug 2011, 17:22
Just a quick question. As per ICAO regs., up to what height should minimum climb gradient be maintained?

GSLOC
2nd Oct 2011, 02:17
Anyone .. ?

ssflying
2nd Oct 2011, 05:54
:8are you asking about 2nd segment climb

Lessnessman
2nd Oct 2011, 18:52
If you have access to Jepp general section, SID/DP & STAR Legend Pg 84..As Well as Briefing Bulletin Jep 08-A...

Pg 84 is very Detailed to the required Gradient..and to what extent.

LNM

seilfly
4th Oct 2011, 12:19
Lessnessman: Jeppesen INTRODUCTION PAGE 84 has the headline SID, DP AND STAR LEGEND, and further expresses; PROCEDURE APPLICABLE TO USA FAA ONLY. The thread starter asked for ICAO-procedures.

Also, the "JEP 08-A" has the headline "MULTIPLE APPROACH PROCEDURE INDICATORS" for all the manuals (Europe manual, US enroute and terminal manual, etc). Are we having different versions?

I am usually a "read-only" member of pprune, but since no one else has picked up this one;

GSLOC - ICAO Doc 8168 vol 1 (PANS-OPS) states;
1.5.5.2 The final PDG continues until obstacle clearance is ensured for the next phase of flight (i.e. en-route,
holding or approach). At this point, the departure procedure ends and is marked by a significant point.
*PDG meaning Procedure Design Gradient; minimum 3,3% (2,5% OIS + 0,8% MOC iaw PANS-OPS (TERPS uses ft/nm but they correspond pretty well for standard climb gradient for departures))

By that, I understand, that if nothing is noted on your departure (or if on a omnidirectional departure with no climb gradient constraints other than standard), keep 3,3% climb gradient until reaching MEA or any off-route minimum obstacle clearence altitude if flying direct, off airways... (Yes in some countries you can still do that :D )

Should a SID or omnidirectional departure state a minimum climb gradient of 6% to 1000ft, then standard, of course, you comply with that (or don't take off if you are unable to, at least not on IFR)... Reaching 1000ft, keep the standard climb gradient (3,3%) until reaching an altitude where "obstacle clearence is ensured for the next phase of flight" (quote from PANS-OPS again).

I may have "answered" alot of stuff you know; but it makes it more readable to someone jumping right into the thread ;)