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X-BleedOpen
31st Oct 2008, 10:34
Hi guys!

I would like to buy an Airbus Compatible headset, and the only one I found with the airbus jack included in the wire itself was the SennHeiser HMEC25 CAP.

Now I see they come with batteries and I didn't understand very well if they are self powered or if they work with any other power supply.

To make the ANR work, does the ACP need to be in INT? We only use it like this up to FL100.

Last but not least, is there any better headset?

Thanks!

lc_aerobatics
31st Oct 2008, 15:22
Hi,

Company I'm very familiar with uses Airman850 with XLR's on it however my mate bought himself HMEC25KA's with additional airbus adaptor and they work very well you just need to make sure that pin 5 has got mic power connected (not connected in normal adapter, we had one made by
the flyingshop).

Cheers.

avionneta
31st Oct 2008, 21:30
Check Plantronics headsets. Whatever your choice, choose a headset with the classical two jacks and add an adaptor (two jacks to airbus plug). Otherwise you'll have to buy a second headset next time you fly a boeing or any non airbus type

Dream Land
2nd Nov 2008, 03:10
Headsets are very subjective, what I like may not be good for you, I personally don't like the new Senheizer ANR headsets (no batteries) because of a super cheap size adjustment that eventually wears out, plus wearing a headset that goes over the top of your head is a pain. I will suggest Clarity Aloft, it wraps around the back of your head and can be worn for hours, it's passive noise reduction.

gsmini320
15th Nov 2008, 22:06
Well, am not pleased with the clarity aloft at all.
Great sound quality! The worst in comfort!
Can't wear them all flight, starts acking quickly. Never had such an uncomfortable headset before. Really a shame IMHO, looked really nice in the beginning and sound was excellent.
So, try before you buy I would say:cool:!

Metro man
15th Nov 2008, 23:16
To make the ANR work, does the ACP need to be in INT?

No need for ANR in the bus, cockpit is very quiet. I use a Plantronics MS200, tiny ear plug with a mic attached. Would look a bit silly with my old Dave Clarke H10-80. ;)

747dieseldude
16th Nov 2008, 07:11
I am very satisfied with the Telex 850. They have it either with dual jacks or with Airbus jack.

Fearless Leader
16th Nov 2008, 13:30
I also have good things to say about Telex.

Have been using the Telex 5X5 Pro lll for more than 20 years now and have had no problems with either Boeing or AirBus A/C.

Only thing with this headset is that I have to put a piece of tissue in the sound tube to mute the volume from BOTH A/C.
Even with the volume control on the panel turned full low, it is still too loud with a custom ear mold. And that goes for both types.

I had to replace the cord once, when in the 737, I opened the window and the cord got stuck in the track and was cut.

Sent it back to Telex and they threw in a new style electret mic when they replaced the wires.

Can't complain about that at all.

For the AirBus, just get an adapter from Marv Golden, or some one like that, so if you do change fleets, you can take the headset with you.

So much better than spitting into a communal headset.

So many choices now, have fun.

FL.

Beavis and Butthead
10th Mar 2009, 00:02
Any more updated opinions on this? I am looking at spending a bit on a good headset for the Airbus, but one that can be used on the Boeing as well as the Bus seeing as that is the future of my particular airline. Favourite for me at the moment is the Sennheiser HMEC25-KA but criticisms/recommendations very welcome to avoid a disappointing outlay of cash.

Any opinions appreciated :ok:

Iceman49
10th Mar 2009, 00:43
The headset that come with the aircraft work fine, cockpit is very quiet.

gblen
11th Mar 2009, 01:23
plantronics ms200 is perfect. its what i use and have zero complaints.

gatbusdriver
11th Mar 2009, 04:35
Lightspeed Zulu

I tried this and the bose. Lightspeed was quieter and more comfortable (bigger ear cups). Can plug MP3 into it. Drawback is the mic is on the left hand side and dors not rotate through 180 degrees.

Thridle Op Des
11th Mar 2009, 06:39
Another Plantronics MS200 fan, as a TRI who occupies both seats, it is also really useful being able to use either ear (rather than have a custom left or right insert). I am considering the tbone, but am not convinced yet that I will be able to hear open cockpit communication properly, especially in a training situation. Any experience anyone?

Regards

TOD

YankeeGolf
11th Mar 2009, 09:05
Best for me Telex Airman850 ANR, No Batteries needed, comes either in airbus jacks or boeing jacks. when the ANR is on u may feel the engines are not running, its that quiet!
:eek:

G-ONADS
11th Mar 2009, 15:18
Check out UFlyMike (http://www.uflymike.com)

It in combination with a Bose Quiet Comfort 11 are absolutely brilliant. Used by many thousands of folks here in the New World:ok:

Big Bad D
12th Mar 2009, 11:40
Boomsets (headsets with boom microphones) should have been correctly certified for acceptable CVR noise level operation for specific aircraft models. That is not to say that other individual choices of boomset cannot be installed with the correct plugs and will not work to the pilot's satisfaction, but not every make or model will have been certified or would necessarily be acceptable to the airworthiness authority. The aircraft manufacturer's IPC should advise which boomset part numbers are already certified.

mblackey
12th Mar 2009, 18:46
There are two categories of equipment for certified aircraft, installed equipment and supplemental equipment. Pilot personal headsets are typically supplemental equipment.

Aircraft certification and headset CVR, etc. only apply if an aircraft is type certified with headsets installed. That is rarely done. That's why you see speakers and handmikes in certified aircraft and that equipment is accountable in an equipment list. Those ARE installed equipment and subject to design restrictions. If an aircraft was not certified with headsets installed, there is typically no restriction on what a pilot uses for personal equipment. Passengers, ramp, and maintenance plug about anything into aircraft comm systems without regard to any technical compatibility or operating condition.

In the U.S. a "TSO" certification program run by the FAA addresses manufacturing and minimum performance standards for articles such as headsets, but it is not authority to "install" a TSO'd article in an aircraft. In other words, replacing an installed microphone with a personal boom microphone, even though the personal mic is TSO'd, isn't authority to do it.

Bottom line in the U.S. pilots can use what they want for personal headsets without restriction by the FAA or the aircraft manufacturer as long as they don't remove or replace the installed equipment of the aircraft.

NOTE: The UFlyMike headset is TSO'd by the FAA.

Beavis and Butthead
13th Mar 2009, 21:24
Thanks for the helpful replies.

manuel ortiz
16th Mar 2009, 03:13
Thridle,

I made some trials for a tbone head set company flying the A 320 family some 5 years ago.

Maybe they are better now but make sure you try them first before buying. We use INT during climbs and descends and there was allways a little more backround hish than normal and my voice would have frequently sort of like speaking via a tube effect.

Company ended up selling its project to another one. They had plans to make them wireless. It would be nice to go to the rest room and continue to monitor what is going on up front.

I still use plantronics with a custom made earpeace. (No headband )

rubik101
16th Mar 2009, 04:17
Headsets are a bit like bottled water; to be trendy you need to be seen with an expensive and unnecessary appendage about your person.
The factory (tap) supplied headsets are more than adequate for the intended job. The bus is very quiet, ANR is a waste of time and if I were you I would spend the money on a good meal, or twelve or buy a wider TV.

Beavis and Butthead
17th Mar 2009, 15:18
Fair point rubik101, and the ANR side of things is not really the issue for me (and if you knew me you wouldn't use the word trendy :8).

Having flown the Airbus for 2 years I have an idea what I am after. The 2 main reasons that I would prefer my own personal headset is 1) hygiene and 2) sound clarity. Although my company provides antiseptic wipes, it is not possible in my view to thoroughly clean the headset prior to each flight, and the microphone in particular harbours germs that I don't really want just a few millimeteres from my mouth. As far as sound quality goes, I find that my Sennheiser 1410KA that I have now has to have a much higher volume than the HMEC25 when I used that because of the clarity of the reception. I am conscious of protecting my hearing and it concerns me having a high volume to compensate for clarity.

Thanks again for the replies :ok:

Retire2015
26th Mar 2009, 15:38
Hello B&B,

Thanks for starting this thread. I am searching for a new headset.

I currently fly 7-8 hours per day in A-320 series a/c (2-5 sectors). I have used the same Sennheiser HMEC 45-KAS for abut 12 years on on this equipment and the 330,737,757,767.

Now that I am up to high levels of flying again, I notice hearing decrements after a few days of flying.

Please let me know what headset you narrow your search to. I will buy in the next few weeks.

In response to previous questions:

--Personal headsets reduce colds due to less "sharing" of headset. My friend bought a cheap one like the airline provides, and saw his winter colds drop to near zero.

--The Airbus is quieter than most aircraft, but after enough time it becomes an issue.

--The Sennheiser HMEC 45-KAS worked good for instructing. Good cross-cockpit hearing and mike on either side. I sent back the closed cup version because of sweaty ears and unacceptable cross-cockpit hearing.

--I will pursue the recommendations of others on this thread.

R

goeasy
27th Mar 2009, 10:39
The bus is certainly queiter that the Boing(sp). But having done research of the subject trying to get ANR headsets supplied, it has been proven that it is not the ambient noise which causes hearing loss. It is the raised radio volume, to hear clearly over the ambient noise. Therfore, even with the bus noise levels, an ANR headset makes a huge difference. With my Sennheiser ANR headset, I have the RMP on min vol, as opposed to mid volume with company Sennheiser headsets. Much less tiring day!

It is funny tho when FO spots my radio turned down, and tries to be 'helpfull Harry' by turning it up for me....... :ugh: