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Flying Bull
11th Apr 2008, 18:48
Hi all,

returned today from a simulator week and were a passenger in an Air France Airbus 320 (AF 7663)
In the safety briefing the stewardess pointed along the floor for the emergency lighting and on the safetycard there was a picture showing passengers crawling along the safety lighting to the exits.
But when I looked on the floor, all I saw was a dark carpet extending from one side to the other, no interrupts in the aisle to see.
Is that a special carpet or are the emergency lights extra strong to shine through?
Just wondering, because in all other planes I travelled so far, I could see the lightlines, which would guide me to the exits - in case off.....

Greetings Flying Bull

Chris Scott
11th Apr 2008, 19:08
Hi Flying Bull,

The floor-path lighting system is always vulnerable to damage from routine passage of shoes (including stiletto), baggage, and catering equipment. On some aircraft, it has been moved to the base of the seats. Maybe your aircraft was one of those.

Spitoon
11th Apr 2008, 19:39
Look for little boxes that look like torches on the seat legs. I noticed them on a SWR aircraft a while back - strange thing was they only seemed to be pointing one way.

411A
11th Apr 2008, 20:23
....strange thing was they only seemed to be pointing one way.

Ahhh, toward the nearest exit, perhaps?
Just a thought.

Spitoon
11th Apr 2008, 20:30
Interesting point 411A. But as they say on the emergency briefing (well some of them anyway) 'please take time to familiarise yourself with the location of the exits bearing in mind that the nearest usable exit may be behind you'.

I'd like to think that if the smoke's coming from where the lights are enticing me to go that I'll still get some guidance on how to get out. But on the other hand, maybe if everyone is going in the same direction it's better overall.

ChristiaanJ
11th Apr 2008, 22:14
Reminds me of an earlier thread, where we said some of us wouldn't mind a hands-on with those life vests during the flight, rather than just the fashion show.
Same thread, IIRC where somebody else suggested there should be an escape slide mock-up to practice on in the departure hall, rather than only the shopping mall.

Maybe there also should be a way to activate the floor-path lighting during the safety briefing.... not everyone could see it maybe, but it would help.

G-TTIC
11th Apr 2008, 22:33
The floor-path lighting system is always vulnerable to damage from routine passage of shoes (including stiletto), baggage, and catering equipment. On some aircraft, it has been moved to the base of the seats. Maybe your aircraft was one of those.

This is quite common, particularly on aircraft with convertible business/economy seats as the aisle is never neccesarily "fixed". On the BA shorthaul fleet, for example, the emergency lighting is on the sides of the seats.

In some ways this is a good system, as the lighting is at crawling eye level.

Maybe there also should be a way to activate the floor-path lighting during the safety briefing.... not everyone could see it maybe, but it would help.

FR demonstrate the emergency lighting sytem during the safety demonstration but as far as I'm aware they use photoluminescent floor strips which aren't really "turned on".

Not many airlines are keen to use the emergency lighting system in situations other than an emergency as it runs off a battery that, if I recall correctly, cannot be easily recharged.

ChristiaanJ
11th Apr 2008, 23:06
FR demonstrate the emergency lighting sytem during the safety demonstration but as far as I'm aware they use photoluminescent floor strips which aren't really "turned on".I have flown FR quite recently but have never seen this, and if they do 'demonstrate' it, they don't draw attention to it.

Not many airlines are keen to use the emergency lighting system in situations other than an emergency as it runs off a battery that, if I recall correctly, cannot be easily recharged.To me, as an engineer, this would seem halfway stupid....

One, turning it on before each flight would at least check it would be likely to turn on for an emergency during that flight (known as reducing the "risk period").

Two, if the battery cannot be easily recharged, my friend Murphy tells me it won't be recharged regularly and correctly.
Thanks, that really reassures me.....

G-TTIC
11th Apr 2008, 23:46
I have flown FR quite recently but have never seen this, and if they do 'demonstrate' it, they don't draw attention to it.

At FR, three cabin crew conduct the demonstration, evenly spaced throughout the cabin. Two crew start the demonstration by indicating the floor path lighting while the third crew member remains in the real galley and switches the emergency lighting system on and off repeatedly. This flashes the lights on the underside of the overhead lockers and beside the exits. Having done this, the third crew member takes their position to indicate the exit routes.

One, turning it on before each flight would at least check it would be likely to turn on for an emergency during that flight (known as reducing the "risk period").

I beleive this is included in the nightly maintenance check.

Two, if the battery cannot be easily recharged, my friend Murphy tells me it won't be recharged regularly and correctly.

I am merely cabin crew so I'm not entirely sure about this. However, one would imagine that such a vital safety system would be maintained at regular intervals.

IFixPlanes
12th Apr 2008, 08:46
The batterypacks that powers the emergency exit signs get charged (if necessary) as long as aircraft is powered.
So recharging is no maintenance item.

Flying Bull
12th Apr 2008, 09:36
Hi all,

well, the thread started off like a bird on the runway ;-)


@ Chris - thanks, that could be the reason - didn't look for other devices cause I'm used to the one on the floor.

@ Spiton - everybody going in the same direction - like on en- and disembarking a bird? That take ages - o.k., in an emergency you should leave you handbaggage behind - but I doubt that everybody would.
The time spreads to ages while waiting to get out when you have to reach your next flight in another terminal and time is late. (and that was sitting row 9)

@ ChristiaanJ - being a pilot (though helicopter) myself and flying at least once a year, having spent two years in GB and being fairly fit in English and having some basic knowledge of French, I still found it hard to understand the announcements in the safety briefing - even so I knew, what would come!
An emergency wouldn't be a problem for the frequent flyer, who might have even booked his seat close to an exit, people which fly for the first time or very seldom would have a problem.
Seen it better on an Air Berlin flight, where the safety briefing was on monitors.

Another concern is the seat spacing - not in business class, but the normal ones. O.K, I'm tall, but with everybody getting taller and many other getting fatter, some won't even be able to get out of their seats, if anybody adjacent is unconsciousness or dead.
But an seat row extra is extra money and everybody want's to fly for 29 cross Europe....

Greetings Flying Bull

LPS500
12th Apr 2008, 15:02
It could be AF is using luminous floor strips. It comes in different colours so as to blend in with the carpet.

IFixPlanes
12th Apr 2008, 15:22
"... luminous floor strips ..."
Take a look here:
http://www.lufthansa-technik.com/guideline/welcome/welcome.html :ok:

ukeng
12th Apr 2008, 15:47
We have them on our 757 fleet. No idea how they managed to get certified as the light emitted is woeful compared to traditional battery powered lighting.

JamesA
14th Apr 2008, 08:35
ChristiaanJ,
I, too, am an engineer. One company I worked for checked the lights daily, in- and out- side on the overnight check. They were also demonstrated every flight as part of the safety briefing. One day one of our electricians told me it took up to six hours for the battery packs to recharge after operating the lights, maybe they are quicker nowadays. I am referring to B737-300 series.

IFixPlanes
14th Apr 2008, 17:04
Right, the B737CL use the batteriepacks if exit lights are switched on.
But the time to recharge the batteries after operation depends on the time they were switched on.
The AMM give you the time for recharge:
http://img74.imageshack.us/img74/7581/b737batteriechargetimedu6.th.jpg (http://img74.imageshack.us/my.php?image=b737batteriechargetimedu6.jpg)