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Qatar ATC
19th Jun 2007, 15:37
Hello guys,

I am seeking information about :

1-low visibility pattern
2-Normal Jet pattern

Explintions or Information regarding those would be appreciated

Thanks!

TheGorrilla
19th Jun 2007, 18:52
Are you refering to what we call the circuit in the UK?

If I understand you correctly you are asking about the differences between a visual circuit and a circling manouver in a jet.

A visual circuit is an entirely visual exercise usually flown for take-off and landing practice where as circling is a manouver flown from an IFR approach where it is not possible to land directly after becoming visual (i.e. tailwind). Most circling manouvers are usually flown fully configured for landing at a lower speed (to keep turn radius down and airfield in sight)and at lower height than a circuit (normal pattern).

Hope this helps. It is the same for jet and non-jet aircraft btw.

Qatar ATC
19th Jun 2007, 18:58
Hi,

Thanks for feedback just not to get lost.

I am looking how to

" fly an low visibility pattern "

Thanks for answers,
Keeping them coming please!

gatbusdriver
19th Jun 2007, 19:28
low vis circling approach

Firstly fly instrument approach for opposite runway

B757 - flap 20 gr dn
A320/A330 - flap 3 gr dn

Level off at circling altitude.

When visual (prior to MAP), turn 45 degrees. Timing is 30s wings level or 45s at start of turn.

At end of timing turn downwind.

Timing from abeam the threshold is 3s per hundred feet AGL +/- 1/2s per knot of head/tail wind .

Turn base, select landing flap.

In the event of missed approach, must always fly missed approach for initial instrument approach.

Hope this helps.

FlexibleResponse
20th Jun 2007, 13:33
gatbusdriver,

Beautiful description!

Also, if you are allowed to use the AP, this will make the exercise very safe and a POP!

Qatar ATC
20th Jun 2007, 15:18
Thanks guys!

Really helped me. I appreciate it !

Wizofoz
20th Jun 2007, 16:03
must always fly missed approach for initial instrument approach.


With the added proviso that the initial turn must always be towards the runway