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spfoster
20th Nov 2006, 12:51
Hi,

Can anyone please tell me what VER stands for on an Avro RJ-100 speedchart?

I have searched everywhere on the Internet and cannot find a reference to it anywhere.

Thank you very much in anticipation.

Regards,

Steve.

PIK3141
20th Nov 2006, 18:47
VER is the En-Route climb speed, as would be stated in the Airplane Flight Manual, the AFM, as required by BCAR's, FAR's, JAR'S etc. The speed at which, having lost an engine, you climb, or at which, if in the cruise and loose an engine, you driftdown to the stabilising altitude.

spfoster
21st Nov 2006, 11:20
Thank you very much.

regards,

Steve.

AvroFlyer
30th Nov 2006, 01:31
VER is the En-Route climb speed, as would be stated in the Airplane Flight Manual, the AFM, as required by BCAR's, FAR's, JAR'S etc. The speed at which, having lost an engine, you climb, or at which, if in the cruise and loose an engine, you driftdown to the stabilising altitude.

Correct me if I am totally wrong, but Vfto, Final T/O Speed, is the speed for max climb in all cases (flaps 0 selected). Ver adds an additional of 10 kts, which corresponds with min manouvering speed. When climbing with Vfto, max angle of bank should be limited to 15 degrees, which is not the case when you have accelerated to Ver.

Capn Bloggs
30th Nov 2006, 02:43
Avroflyer, that was my understanding too.

JonaLX
30th Nov 2006, 08:33
is there then a fixed relationship between Ver and best rate of climb speed?
Thus an easy way to calculate Max range speed?

AvroFlyer
30th Nov 2006, 11:51
is there then a fixed relationship between Ver and best rate of climb speed?
Thus an easy way to calculate Max range speed?

Yes, Ver is always Vfto+10kts, and Vfto varies with aircraft weight.

Max range speed... good question, in my company we use three standard speeds for cruise, but I suppose this varies with weight as well. I have to check the AFM for that.

flyingflatfour
3rd Dec 2006, 13:21
As in any airplane, the max range speed is the speed at which you'll burn the less fuel per NM. In still air that is the best lift to drag ratio speed. In the 146/RJ series it's Vfto + 30 kts. You'll have to fly faster if you have headwind and slower in tailwind.

Now the standard Long Range Climb / cruise speed is 235 kts which is a good compromise between fuel burn and time. Typically it's only 1% more fuel burn but a lot of time less.