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Fly380
18th Mar 2006, 14:37
Just seen on Spanish tv a very sorry looking 737 with a collapsed right u/c gear. Lots of distressed pax. Looks like it happened landing in Seville. Anyone know more?:uhoh:

ETOPS
18th Mar 2006, 14:59
Here's the link

Air Algerie (http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L18144893.htm)

broadreach
18th Mar 2006, 17:31
http://www.elpais.es/ will take you to the Spanish newspaper El Pais, where there's a front page photo. Nosewheel's about 7ft off the ground.

readywhenreaching
18th Mar 2006, 19:53
source: www.jacdec.de (incl. pics)
<<
DATE: 18.03.2006
LOCAL TIME: ~ 10:25
LOCATION: Seville-Intl AP (LEZL)
COUNTRY: Spain
AIRLINE: Air Algerie
TYPE: Boeing 737-6D6
REGISTRATION: 7T-VJQ
C/N: 30209
AGE: 3 y + 11 m
OPERATION: INP
FLIGHT No.: -
FROM: Oran
TO: Seville
VIA:-
OCCUPANTS:
PAX: 101
CREW:x
FATALITIES:
PAX: 0
CREW: 0
OTHER: 0
INJURIES:
PAX: 45
CREW:x
OTHER: 0
DAMAGE TO AIRCRAFT: substantial
On landing roll the right main gear collapsed causing substantial damage to the right wing structure before coming to rest (partially) beneath runway (27/09, 3300 m). Injuries occured during emegency evacuation. The 737 was chartered by spanish families who host West Saharian children refugees in algerian camps for holidays in their home. Seville airportīs single runway was blocked for hours to ensure rescue operations.>>

gofer
18th Mar 2006, 19:57
:ouch: Click Here (http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20060318-0)

jondc9
19th Mar 2006, 12:54
what is the runway orientation at seville and which runway was the plane landing on?

thunderstorm and heavy rain...slippery runway too I'll bet ( anyone know the drainage capability at this field?)

one report said the plane went off the side of the runway a bit. I see the vis was 3000 meters , about 1 3/4 miles?


the airline I flew for had a rule not to land or takeoff within 3 miles of a t storm, what rules do you have ( I think 5 miles is better)

archae86
20th Mar 2006, 01:17
That photo link did not work for me, but this one did:
jetphoto picture of Seville 737 (http://www.jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=5694413)

Doctor Cruces
20th Mar 2006, 09:26
The pic amused me. A ruddy great 736 with a large blue trailer holding up the wing and someone feels the need to place a small, orange cone at the front to tell people it's there. Classic!!

Doc C

paulthornton
22nd Mar 2006, 14:21
You can just imagine the dry health and safety rule from the rules and regulations book that is being followed to the letter here:
"Ensure that any obstruction or unexpected obstacle is clearly marked with cones...".
Only they wouldn't say 'cone'. They'd describe it as some "Generic marking and conical warning device with alternating high visibility colour scheme" or worse.
Now I'm sure that in their little book a "ruddy great 736 with a large blue trailer holding up the wing" comes under the heading of an unexpected obstacle or some such

:}

Flying Mech
22nd Mar 2006, 21:16
Is this the first 737NG to suffer a strucural collapse like this? A 3 year old A/C is not suppose to do this. There will probably be a few AD notes issued over this for structural inspections

livinginspain
23rd Mar 2006, 07:26
With thanks to " The Town Crier " newspaper.

" 45 INJURED IN BAD LANDING

Forty five passengers were injured when an Air Algerie plane ran off the runway while landing at Sevilla airport last Saturday morning. All 101 passengers and six crew were evacuated safely but all flights in and out of Sevilla were cancelled for several hours while the plane was removed from the runway. The 20-year-old plane had been chartered by the Association of Friends of the Western Sahara People and was bringing back volunteers who had been helping at the Polisario Front refugees camps in Algeria set up to alleviate the consequences of heavy flooding in the area. Airport authorities said the accident could have been caused by a mechanical failure or a brusque manoeuvre by the pilot which caused the plane to tip over until the wing hit the tarmac, bringing it to a stop. Given the nature of the accident, experts said the plane probably would not have passed a rigorous mechanical examination. Accidents on landing are usually caused by a tyre bursting, and one expert said he had never seen anything like Saturday's incident. "

livinginspain
23rd Mar 2006, 07:28
only quoting , by the way !

iBus
23rd Mar 2006, 08:25
The 20-year-old plane had been chartered .... A 737-600 NG >20 years old? The Town Crier obviously checks, double checks and then triple checks itīs stories! :ugh: :{

livinginspain
23rd Mar 2006, 09:56
ibus yes indeed ! I have emailed them already about that !

Out of interest, where would one find the age info on a particular airframe given the reg and c/n ?

I've spend some time trying to find a good authoritative source, and come up empty handed.

Suggestions ?

HotDog
23rd Mar 2006, 11:47
Try this, it has the details of the Seville incident so might have a data base for others as well. I haven't bothered to check. www.jacdec.de

Golf Charlie Charlie
23rd Mar 2006, 11:50
Out of interest, where would one find the age info on a particular airframe given the reg and c/n ?
I've spend some time trying to find a good authoritative source, and come up empty handed.
Suggestions ?

The aircraft (c/n 30209) first flew on 8 April 2002 and was delivered to Air Algerie on 29 April 2002. Check out www.airfleets.net.

livinginspain
23rd Mar 2006, 13:11
thanks for the info