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View Full Version : Cargo Airlines B747 'on the ILS' (merged)


wes_wall
4th Oct 2003, 03:36
Anybody have details on the B747 at LGE?

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/433195/L/

jcb354
4th Oct 2003, 06:41
Cargo Air Lines
A Boeing 747-200 Freighter en route from Nairobi to Liege (Belgium) ran off the runway during its landing at Liege Airport yesterday around 1440. The aircraft ended up in the grass.

from:
http://www.justplanes.com/News7557.html

jet_noseover
4th Oct 2003, 08:25
On Oct. 1st, Cargo Airlines B747 overran runway 23L at Liege.
The craft not only ended up in the grass but hit the localizer antenna . The incident shut down the 23L for at least a couple of days.
The 23L were to remain closed until the craft has been removed. Not sure if it re-opened yet.

If you are wondering about the paint jobÖ,
Well, donít.
CAL took those off of this 747 a few months ago.

End of scoop.
:)

wes_wall
5th Oct 2003, 07:59
Interesting they elected to use the slide. Doesn't appear that there was a danger of fire, but again, pictures don't always tell the story. Perhaps they wanted to experience the slide from the high level instead of the normal L1 type slide used in training.

Farty Flaps
5th Oct 2003, 09:30
hope all the flowers escaped injury.no to worried about the green beans or chillies.:}

LTNman
5th Oct 2003, 13:33
So how long was the runway????

Nineiron
5th Oct 2003, 13:34
WW of course there was a danger of fire. In those circumstances you could have a ruptured fuel system with plenty of sources of ignition. No time debating the possibilities - you're on the ground - chop the power, fire the bottles and GO - by the nearest exit

Fly747
5th Oct 2003, 16:42
Who was the operator?

classic crew
5th Oct 2003, 19:37
Regarding using the slide.

When the aircraft is converted from pax to a freighter the slides are removed from all the doors. In place of this is just a rope at the L1 and L5 doors. All other doors are covered with panelling and could never be used.

As an aside, although I've completed SEP courses on the classic. I have never gone down a slide from that height. It was explained that the likelyhood of injury was very high and so the company would not want the risk of legal action if that happened.

Anti-ice
6th Oct 2003, 00:11
I HAVE gone down that slide in training , in the 80's before all the back injuries/litigation started ,and it is FAST!

Worse than that I thought was the DC10 slide in a mock-up , its practically vertical :ooh:

wes_wall
6th Oct 2003, 22:52
Never went down the slide from the upper level, but in training, did grab the handle and reppel. That was not bad, and I think I would opt for that in lieu of the slide, particularly if no smoke or fire was visible.

747FOCAL
8th Oct 2003, 22:05
:ugh:

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/433400/L/

flyer75
8th Oct 2003, 22:12
I guess those 2 fellas wont get the 742 jobs advertised everywhere lately...

NAV GREEN
8th Oct 2003, 23:43
Should read established in the ILS

747FOCAL
9th Oct 2003, 00:20
Looks like he is on it to me. :p

RatherBeFlying
9th Oct 2003, 01:35
Bang on the localiser

av8boy
9th Oct 2003, 04:53
Actually it's a perfectly executed localizer-only approach. See, if it'd been a full-on ILS the glideslope antenna would be mounted in the wing...

Dave:cool:

747FOCAL
9th Oct 2003, 21:13
Just think of what it will be like to go down that slide on the A380...... Your talking light speed when you hit the bottom and and any gal in a skirt and nylons will have them baked to her backside. :{

Huck
10th Oct 2003, 01:53
If you are sitting in the grass, chances are you're gonna end up sitting at the big green oval table anyway (everyone drinking coffee but you) - so blowing the slide or not will probably not make much difference, career wise.

Now... choosing to evacuate pax that way - THAT is a big deal. But not merely cargo pilots ( I knew a guy that cracked a vertebrae once in training, though).

Stratocaster
10th Oct 2003, 02:27
Well, if you were in their situation, would you expect the handling agent to send you the stairs in the mud ?
:)

Ignition Override
10th Oct 2003, 14:24
I feel sorry for the pilots involved. How long is that runway, and was there much of a tailwind? Rain makes runways quite slippery ( I might prefer a very thin layer of dry snow on a long runway) and so what effect does it have on the "cargo whale" escape ropes? If you lose a good grip, how do you get it back? :ouch: (no symbol here for broken bones).

JW411
12th Oct 2003, 18:01
According to the photographs that I have seen the starboard upper slide operated perfectly. Who would use a wet rope when a perfectly good slide is available?

I have heard a rumour that the captain was on his first day out in the left seat.

Taildragger67
13th Oct 2003, 20:32
VH-OJH ended up in a not dissimilar situation about 4 years ago (ok, she went right THROUGH the loc & wound up a couple hundred yards beyond, but you get the idea).

Didn't evac; some slides did pop later, apparently when ground techs opened various doors without disarming. The right-hand U/D slide nicely inflated onto a tree...

The story was that, whilst a couple of engines' fuse pins broke/pylons buckled (so possibility of ruptured fuel lines), there was no actual fire so no need to bang out ASAP.

But as long as the crew were able to walk away from this to the pant-scraper by themselves, well, they lived to hopefully fly another day.