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Alaska Airlines 737-900 MAX loses a door in-flight out of PDX

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Alaska Airlines 737-900 MAX loses a door in-flight out of PDX

Old 6th Jan 2024, 12:45
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Originally Posted by Ollie Onion
Wouldn’t go near a 737 Max if you paid me to fly on it. Between MAS, dodgy rudder fastenings and now this.
Not to mention oval holes drilled in the rear bulkhead...

Likewise not keen on going on a MAX, or anything.

Every thing like this suggests QC failings are being found by chance, not as a result of a thorough QC process review. Given how far down the QC cliff the company has fallen, and incidents like this demonstrating that they've not yet climbed back up, one wonders what other horrors are lurking. It's hard to believe that these QC failings affect only one model; and indeed 787 has had its share of QC problems of late too.

So, how long does one give the company before declaring them not competent to make any airframe? And if one did make such a declaration, how retrospective would that have to be?
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 12:45
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Originally Posted by A0283
Consultants never take away the responsibility of management. Managers decide.
Consultants bring knowledge and experience and are able to adapt to industry and company or come from them. Those that don’t should get a different label.

As far as I know in the whole 737MAX saga there have been no references to consultants….
That is the theory. In reality is is much easier to make a decision if you can point to a consultancy report (that is not publicly available) where you took some parts completely out of context. I have seen that way too often.

Technical consultants are a different issue, where often retention of knowlegde is an issue. In theory everything has been documented, in reality hardly anyone is able to go through the documentation, if they can still find it after a few years...

Didn't Boeing have some junior employee responsible for quality control with no actual power to take any action?

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Old 6th Jan 2024, 12:51
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK
The original photo from which I cropped that image shows that they are just reflections from the hangar lighting, visible all along the fuselage.
Yes, accepted. I posted after another comment to that effect. My question/comment about damage on the ground still remains though again I saw your post about maintenance having been done on that door. If one was looking for a reason why it failed early on this flight and not on previous flights then one explanation could be that the cause was not present on previous flights.
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 12:58
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Originally Posted by msbbarratt
Pretty sure that it's only the seat back cushion that's departed, in the first post's photo it looks like the seat frame itself is still there.

Still somewhat interesting that it could come loose like that; how are they attached, Velcro?
Yes velcro.
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:11
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How do you get your shirt "sucked off"?

I'm not saying it didn't happen, but I saw this as part of a magician's trick once, the whole point being that it was "impossible" because your arms go through the sleeves and hold it in place

Given Boeing's reputation, maybe the child won't be the only one to lose his shirt
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:16
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I suspect the 200 mph gust might have had some influence, however short a time that was. For a moment the child likely resembled the car lot inflatables with their arms flailing in the air.

So, someone on the ground gets: A door. An inner panel. A child's shirt. A seat cover. And, per the BBC, a cellular phone.

Amazingly the nearby tray table remained in place.

I picture a rural location where someone, looking up into a tree, says "Bob? What the hell did you get up to last night?"
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:16
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Originally Posted by procede
That is the theory. In reality is is much easier to make a decision if you can point to a consultancy report (that is not publicly available) where you took some parts completely out of context. I have seen that way too often.

Technical consultants are a different issue, where often retention of knowlegde is an issue. In theory everything has been documented, in reality hardly anyone is able to go through the documentation, if they can still find it after a few years...

Didn't Boeing have some junior employee responsible for quality control with no actual power to take any action?
If there was a period in Boeing’s history when QC had no authority, I’m somewhat unnerved by the thought that anything that they built in this period is allowed to fly.
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:20
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I'm all for the window seat view, but that's taking things a little too far!
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:27
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Can we talk about how 5 of their MAX 9s just departed? How long does a "full maintenance and safety inspections" take for one aircraft. Something tells me that you can't do that all within one night..........
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:27
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The seat to the right of the window looks a little bent out of shape!

Also, presuming these won't actually be back in the air at Alaska until they've actually found the root cause of the issue? I read above the CEO said there would be a safety inspection in next few days but one assumes that won't be enough to get them flying again?
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:32
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Originally Posted by msbbarratt
interesting that it could come loose like that; how are they attached, Velcro?
If doors are only secured by sealant, then anything is possible
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:35
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Originally Posted by aeromech3
If it is a plug, then it would need to be brought inside slightly and turned to go outward; the stops are still visible so unlikely it just blew out, more to the story?
If the plug was never installed properly or latched it could shift position when the aircraft was unpressurized until it was able to blow out. It appears the aircraft had pressurization issues the day prior.
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:35
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Originally Posted by Thruster763
Makes me think of a BAC 1-11 windscreen and wrong sized fastners. Looks a lot like an assembly issue and the panel was only held in wth sealant and incorrect fastners or several fastners missing.
Me too!!
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:35
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Originally Posted by Sue Vêtements
How do you get your shirt "sucked off"?

I'm not saying it didn't happen, but I saw this as part of a magician's trick once, the whole point being that it was "impossible" because your arms go through the sleeves and hold it in place.
Maybe file with the other reports I've seen that an entire seat departed ...
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:38
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK
Unconfirmed reports that Alaskan had previously had to do work on the door.
They are going to offer row 26 to adventurers and thrill seekers for just 30 euros!
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 13:58
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Originally Posted by procede
Ryanair would probably charge extra for the view.
... except Ryanair don't fly 737-MAX - they fly "Gamechangers".
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 14:05
  #77 (permalink)  
 
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No Mayday - Again

And yet again we see the reluctance for U.S. pilots to declare MAYDAY!! MAYDAY!! MAYDAY!! that gets EVERYBODYS immediate attention rather than a mumbled call and where a controller had to ask "are you an emergency or do you just wish to return to Portland" that was after he stopped their descent at 7000' from what I could hear on the R/T recording, posted earlier. Unless, of course, you don't consider having a piece of your aeroplane falling off causing an explosive decompression (or should that be an unplanned pressure operated, gravity assisted, removal of a fuselage panel and internal atmosphere) A342
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 14:08
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Just seen this, from yesterday: https://www.seattletimes.com/busines...it-in-the-air/

Looks like Boeing have learnt nothing over the past few years (and the FAA are still "bending over" for them).

Just reinforces my view: If its Boeing I ain't going
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 14:25
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Originally Posted by ACW342
And yet again we see the reluctance for U.S. pilots to declare MAYDAY!! MAYDAY!! MAYDAY!! that gets EVERYBODYS immediate attention rather than a mumbled call and where a controller had to ask "are you an emergency or do you just wish to return to Portland" that was after he stopped their descent at 7000' from what I could hear on the R/T recording, posted earlier. Unless, of course, you don't consider having a piece of your aeroplane falling off causing an explosive decompression (or should that be an unplanned pressure operated, gravity assisted, removal of a fuselage panel and internal atmosphere) A342
In their defence: the pilots probably would not have noticed the hole, if not for the cabin pressurisation warning.
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Old 6th Jan 2024, 14:30
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Doesn’t help if - as reported - the adjacent seat was defenestrated…..
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