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Old 6th Dec 2017, 21:30   #1 (permalink)
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Video of LSA flat-spin test flight with BRS save

This video shows a flat-spin test flight with a BRS parachute save at about 1000'.

https://tinyurl.com/y9ab9dro


I thought I recognized the pilot and it was confirmed at the end of the video. It's Phill Hooker, a well-known Kiwi instructor, who did my first Kiwi BFR and who also allowed me to pole around his Bell 47G, a few years ago.

He's now living in Zuhai, working as a factory test-pilot. Here is one of his comments on the incident:

Quote:
I was exploring any flat spin tendencies that this type of aircraft was rumored to get itself into. and yes it did, it would not recover. Deployment at 1000' (could not do any higher, too long to explain) If you watch the video again, you will notice the front right riser tightened 4 secs before impact
His only injury was being hit on the head by the canopy, as he exited.
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 00:41   #2 (permalink)
 
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Is it the Triton by any chance?

http://www.cityofzhuhai.com/2016-09/14/c_57694.htm

Itís a scary video.
And so are LSAís...
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 01:39   #3 (permalink)
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It probably is the Triton Skytrek, although there is no confirmation, but it certainly looks like it in the video. Phill is the test pilot for the manufacturer.


Last edited by India Four Two; 12th Dec 2017 at 00:29. Reason: Fixed YouTube URL
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 21:44   #4 (permalink)
 
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Is there a possibility of the parachute twisting when deployed from an aircraft spinning like that?
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Old 8th Dec 2017, 15:24   #5 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
It probably is the Triton Skytrek, although there is no confirmation, but it certainly looks like it in the video. Phill is the test pilot for the manufacturer.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=g0jfG_lHESw
ĎHe looks Chinese or Asian but he isntí

Cringe worthy remark.....
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Old 8th Dec 2017, 15:59   #6 (permalink)
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B2N2,

You seem to be inferring that I made that remark. It certainly wasn't me. Phill is a friend of mine and I am very happy that the BRS worked as advertised.
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Old 8th Dec 2017, 17:49   #7 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
B2N2,

You seem to be inferring that I made that remark. It certainly wasn't me. Phill is a friend of mine and I am very happy that the BRS worked as advertised.
No the guy in the airshow video states that the owner of the company is chinese looking but ĎAmericaní.
That was cringeworthy.
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Old 9th Dec 2017, 02:39   #8 (permalink)
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OK. Now I understand. I agree, I cringed when I heard that on the video.

I met the owner at Oshkosh last year, where they had trailered one of their aircraft all the way from Seattle! They didnít yet have a US C of A.

Heís a really nice guy, who I would describe as Chinese American.
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Old 9th Dec 2017, 16:34   #9 (permalink)
 
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What I would be interested to know is what the planned spin recovery control inputs were. The stick is moved almost continuously at a relatively high frequency with any input never being held for more than about 1 sec. To effect spin recovery in any aircraft you must apply the desired control input then hold it. If, after a specified time or number of turns, there has been no response then the prolonged spin recovery inputs should be applied. This philosophy does not appear to have been used in this case.
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Old 10th Dec 2017, 13:41   #10 (permalink)
 
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Why did he wait so long....................
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Old 10th Dec 2017, 14:31   #11 (permalink)
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There were some power lines nearby, so he delayed pulling, in order to reduce the risk of drifting into them.
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Old 10th Dec 2017, 16:12   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
To effect spin recovery in any aircraft you must apply the desired control input then hold it.
This has been my experience too. There are inertial forces of the aircraft which must be allowed time to be overcome, and time for the airflow to sort itself out. Flight Manual spin recovery instructions I have read generally include the term "hold" with respect to control inputs.

During aft C of G spin testing of the modified Cessna Grand Caravan, I applied full nose down control, and held it for 3/4 of a turn, before the aircraft seemed to respond at all. Entirely opposite to the forward C of G spins, the nose did not go far below the horizon during recovery. It recovered exactly as the requirements prescribe, but proper technique and patience were certainly beneficial.
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Old 11th Dec 2017, 01:17   #13 (permalink)
 
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Well.....
Iím sure the video doesnít show the entire event.
You donít know if that Ďtechniqueí has been applied with no success earlier.
You can also argue why he didnít realizes his harness to lean forward to change the CG.
He was running out of time and options at the same time.
Good save.
Still donít like LSAís.
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Old 11th Dec 2017, 07:22   #14 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by B2N2 View Post
Still donít like LSAís.
Genuinely curious as to what you mean by that? Is it the lack of inertia?
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Old 11th Dec 2017, 17:28   #15 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
You can also argue why he didnít realizes his harness to lean forward to change the CG.
If your last resort is a BRS chute, you want to be firmly strapped in when the aircraft hits the ground.
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Old 11th Dec 2017, 17:32   #16 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrussy View Post
Genuinely curious as to what you mean by that? Is it the lack of inertia?
Maybe because 'real aircraft' are made from metal, not plastic. (Try telling that to a glider pilot)!
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