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DH-82A VH-TSG Crash of 16 Dec. 2013, Report Released

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DH-82A VH-TSG Crash of 16 Dec. 2013, Report Released

Old 21st Jan 2016, 02:03
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DH-82A VH-TSG Crash of 16 Dec. 2013, Report Released

Poorly-made parts and an incomplete maintenance history.

The ATSB found that both of the aircraft’s fuselage lateral tie rods, which assist in transferring flight loads through the fuselage, had fractured. The location of the fracture coincided with areas of pre-existing fatigue cracking in the threaded sections of the rods, near the join with the left wing. The tie rods fractured during an aerobatic manoeuvre, resulting in the left lower wing separating from the aircraft and subsequent in-flight break-up. The ATSB also found that the tie rods were aftermarket parts manufactured under an Australian Parts Manufacturer Approval (APMA). In this respect, safety issues were identified in areas of the tie rods’ design and manufacture, as well as in the supporting regulatory approval processes. Safety issues were also identified in the maintenance and operation of the aircraft.
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DH-82A VH-TSG Crash of 16 Dec. 2013, Report Released
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