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CRM for Private flying?

Old 17th Nov 2015, 20:51
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CRM for Private flying?

Taking up friends or family as passengers in a light aircraft, we have responsibility for their welfare. Of course they trust us, and we don't want to frighten them.

And yet. Just as in DownWest's reference to the youngster who "didn't want to ask a senior officer if he knew what he was doing", I believe it could be useful to include in the preflight briefing for your pax a way of asking for their feedback if anything about the flight is worrying to them.

Like flying into bad weather, flying too low, whatever. "Dad, do you mind if we stop for fuel and a coffee, I think you are getting tired."

How would you react if your teenager was bold enough to suggest that you were less than perfect?
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Old 17th Nov 2015, 21:23
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I sort-of hint that I might not be perfect: "Tell me if you see another aeroplane - I probably already know it's there, but just in case ...".
How would you react if your teenager was bold enough to suggest that you were less than perfect?
Erm, have you ever met a teenager?? - mine did that all the time.
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Old 20th Nov 2015, 11:31
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How would you react if your teenager was bold enough to suggest that you were less than perfect?
It is a common failing that most human beings do not react well to criticism you can see that on here all the time. There is very little interest or genuine understanding of CRM and other aspects of modern airmanship as will be shown by the lack of posts on here.

A simple CRM question-we all know that an aircraft is easier to see when displaying a landing or recognition light so why dont more pilots use one at least in the circuit?
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Old 20th Nov 2015, 18:14
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Exactly, Pull What. I asked the gal in the tower at Wellesborne, while waiting for my aircraft to be flight tested...it was a murky afternoon. And it was very difficult for her to see and keep track of the traffic, practically nobody bothered to put their lights on. Why not, I wonder, couldn't be bothered? or worried about running down the batteries??? or just never thought it could be a difficulty for anybody else. I wonder if since five years ago or thereabouts, if the situation has improved?
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Old 21st Nov 2015, 10:44
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Why- the laws of primacy. People feel happier wiith what they are first taught and form a reluctance to change.

Its a pre taxy checklist item for us we dont move until the light is on.

If your taught at a school that has low standards that will be reflected in your approach to flying unless you have a questioning mentality.

Ive asked many instructors why they dont use lights, they dont really know but the usual excuse is that its not nessecarry.
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Old 21st Nov 2015, 12:56
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Its a pre taxy checklist item for us we dont move until the light is on
I was initially taught to always have a light on.

I have subsequently come across the idea that the lights cost £xxx and only last yy hours so should be switched off when you don't actually "need" them.

Having considered this advice, I have decided to continue to always have a light on.
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Old 25th Nov 2015, 10:08
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Over time, I've made sure I give my passengers a 30 second brief just before I ask for departure clearance. It only takes a few seconds to tell them we're about to go, that I'll run the engine up to check T's and P's, roll, check speed and stop on the runway if there's a problem. Similarly, if we get a problem climbing out, we'll do this or that etc.

It seemed a bit odd the first couple of times i did it, but now it's become routine and I feel happier knowing that I've done my best to make sure my passengers (the people relying on ME to do it properly), have a s much information as they need to know what's going on.

Many of us fly with non-aviators. Don't we owe it to them to make sure they are safe and happy in our care?
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Old 9th Dec 2015, 14:49
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Over time, I've made sure I give my passengers a 30 second brief just before I ask for departure clearance
. Its better CRM to do that briefing before engine start. Near a runway needs full attention and a sterile cockpit
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Old 9th Dec 2015, 15:12
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Passengers flying with me sometimes have difficulty in maintaining a sterile cockpit.
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Old 14th Dec 2015, 16:14
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Worthy of mention that one of the experienced players on the parallel Flyer forums has been organising free (well, a few quid for tea and sandwiches) CRM sessions for private pilots in the UK.

I went to one last year and it was good - similar broad content to airline courses but appropriately tailored to single pilot GA.

Some new courses are being organised this year with details over there if anybody wants to take a look.

G

Last edited by Genghis the Engineer; 14th Dec 2015 at 16:30.
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Old 14th Dec 2015, 18:42
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I have subsequently come across the idea that the lights cost £xxx and only last yy hours so should be switched off when you don't actually "need" them.
I've come across this too when getting checked out, obviously based on the cost argument. My attitude these days is to turn all the lights on for any flight. The more the better!
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