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Crash at Shifnal, shropshire, 5 July 2015

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Crash at Shifnal, shropshire, 5 July 2015

Old 5th Jul 2015, 16:07
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Crash at Shifnal, shropshire, 5 July 2015

Quick actions save lives of two people as light aircraft crashes at Shifnal airfield | shropshirelive.com

Ouch! Looks like a miracle both occupants survived - but they are reported gravely injured, let's hope they'll fly again.

Regarding the plane: could that have been a Rans Coyote? Mike?
Jan Olieslagers is offline  
Old 5th Jul 2015, 16:20
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How many of us could lay hands on a fire extinguisher in our car in under, say, five seconds? When the need arises, at the bottom of the boot doesn't cut it, but this witness was both on the ball and prepared.
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Old 23rd Apr 2020, 22:36
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https://assets.publishing.service.go...CDVF_04-16.pdf

"Four takeoffs, circuits and landings were then flown without incident but the pilot commented, in his report to the AAIB, that that the engine performance “felt sluggish”. While preparing for the fifth takeoff the engine began to run roughly and its rpm decreased before recovering. The pilot checked that the engine instrument readings were normal, the fuel selector was on and that the fuel tank contents were as expected. A magneto drop check was completed after which the pilot carried out two high-power engine runs. As the engine now appeared to be performing normally the pilot decided to carry out another takeoff. Shortly after becoming airborne, between 100 ft and 200 ft agl, there was an uncommanded reduction in engine rpm. The aircraft lost height and struck the ground in a steep nose-down attitude. "

It shows the hazards of taking off with an engine that does not seem to be operating normally. I did it once on a C180 that has been giving poorer than normal performance during the final portion of a climb to altitude on skydiving ops. Engine run at near full power seemed fine when back on the ground. Lost a cylinder on the next flight.


tcasblue is offline  
Old 24th Apr 2020, 07:01
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It's always fascinating to read old AAIB accident investingation reports.
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Old 24th Apr 2020, 18:28
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
It's always fascinating to read old AAIB accident investingation reports.
Quite true. A few years ago, I went though the old de Havilland Comet reports.

Of course, the lessons from a lot of the reports from 20 years ago and longer are just as applicable today.

I am going through many of the threads on this forum and thought I might update with reports the ones that were started but never had a final report to close out the thread.

Last edited by tcasblue; 24th Apr 2020 at 22:53.
tcasblue is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2020, 08:28
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Anyone considering flying in (or even standing underneath) an example of the accident type might want to read this one: https://assets.publishing.service.go...MYES_07-17.pdf

It highlighted a mean UK S6 fleet size of 131 aircraft, a total fleet time of 108,013 hours, and 16 stall-spin accidents. That's a rate of one stall/spin crash every 6,750 hours. Impressively dangerous, that machine. I might add it handles like a badly tied sack of potatoes.
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Old 29th Apr 2020, 12:40
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Originally Posted by Kit Sanbumps KG View Post
Anyone considering flying in (or even standing underneath) an example of the accident type... Impressively dangerous, that machine. I might add it handles like a badly tied sack of potatoes.
Noted. There's a theme with the type...

I think I'll also avoid having a go in the Jabiru: https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/aaib...-ul-450-g-royc

Although now appropriate safety actions have been taken, namely to ensure airfields are kept clear so that the inevitable accident isn't obstructed, maybe it will be OK...

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