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Old 13th Nov 2017, 11:26
  #6266 (permalink)  
PDR1
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Farnham, Surrey
Posts: 1,213
Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
It seemed that there were only two commentators - Murray Walker and James Hunt.

Current F1 seems to have up to ten 'presenters'. A meringue?
Can't speak for the Ch4 coverage, but thh Sky coverage has only two race commentators (Martin Brundle and David Croft, in the official commentary box), but these are augmented periodically by "pit lane" reporting from Ted Kravitz who is called in (audio only) with info he's extracted from teams, and Natalie Pinkham who has the job of getting interviews with drivers that fail to finish. In addition to that they do have one former driver (usually Paul Diresta or Anthony Davidson, but sometimes Bruno Senna) doing detailed driving analysis at the "skypad" screen.

ISTR that's more or less the same as the later BBC/ITV coverage used to deliver except for the skypad bit, but that's a new innovation which wasn't around in Murrey's day.

Before and after the race (but never during) there is additional support from a couple of ex drivers (Damon Hill and Johnie Herbert) plus Simon Lazenby as "anchor". The non-race team formally hand over to the commentators as the 2-minute(?) hooter goes off telling the team crews to leave the grid, and they hand-back coverage during the podium ceremonies. The non-commentary team go off and get remarks and reactions from team principals, chief engineers, mechanics etc. And then after the race (and after quyali, and indeed at the end of the free practice sessions) Ted Kravitz records a 30 minute roving stream of consciousness piece called "Ted's Notebook" which usually includees technical details, insider comments etc, but may equally have bits about the visiting celebs (rare) and behind-the-scenes people. These pieces are almost always interesting, and can be found on the skyf1 website if you're not a sky subscriber.

In addition, it seemed possible for Alain Prost to drive a couple of feet from Nigel Mansell's rear for lap after lap - couldn't be achieved today.
No, mainly because the cars are quite a lot faster and partly because the tyres have been explicitly designed to suffer degredation when overheated. This seemed like a good idea at the time, but is now considered less so (and may be changed). The extra speed comes as much from aero developments (and the current aero rules) as from basic horsepower, and that's why it degrades when following closely.

Hamilton's charge was quite remarkable, as much for the way he spent the whole race overtaking in a car that is known to suffer substantially more than others when in traffic as for the detail that he *must* have run the race disytance faster than everyone else. Having started from the pit-lane he would have been about 10 seconds behind the leader at the end of the first sector on the first lap, but he finished lass than 5 seconds behind the leader at the end - ergo he must have run the race distance faster than vettel.

It's true that he had a new engine and was given extra use of quali modes during the race, but then so was Vettel so that balances out. The extra power is of no use unless it can be used without burning out the tyres, and I think that was Hamilton's big achievement here.

PDR
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