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Old 26th Mar 2019, 09:43
  #748 (permalink)  
henra
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: PLanet Earth
Posts: 800
Originally Posted by Airbubba View Post
From the NTSB Investigative Update on March 12, 2019:
https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/Pages/DCA19MA086.aspx
Indeed. But that would be towards the end after they descended at steep angle and where they started pulling positive g's. I wouldn't be surprised to see >+4g somewhere in the readouts. The alleged -4g would have been at the beginning of the event. And that is where they were at ~230kts.

In the trace of the 720 accident you can see that at 220kts it produced ~ -2g, increasing to -2.8g @ ~280kts. The 720 had a ~20 - 25% lower wing loading than the 767, so should be able to produce ~25 - 30% more g at the same speed (especially in negative direction where no flaps/slats and tricked- out profiles will help).

When we extrapolate this data from the 720 accident we still end up with something around -2 to -2.5g maximum. We'll see the exact figures once the traces are published.
But I would expect something around -2g and +4 - 4.5g as maximum values.
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