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North America Still the busiest region for commercial aviation.

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Old 18th Dec 2016, 14:51   #21 (permalink)
 
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There's no shortage at the legacies. They can still be selective.
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Old 18th Dec 2016, 14:56   #22 (permalink)
 
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We know there is no shortage, but not according to their PR people and lobbyists.
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Old 19th Dec 2016, 06:54   #23 (permalink)
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Sorry for the late answer and thanks a lot for all your inputs.

Looks like a difficult path to get to those majors.

Let's assume I have the green card, a four year degree and my FAA ATP. What kind of salary after tax I could expect? Number of days off, vac, per diem (allowances). Does that vary a lot between the majors or is it more or less standard package for all of them?

To be honest I'm not complaining about my salary eventhough I could as well get more in a European major (but they are not hiring...). As in aviation, we are not shy on sharing our salary Im soon reaching 6000€/month plus 300€ allowances. Every night in my own bed. 10 off days per month + 30 days vac per year. Pension (if stays the same) 5000 net per month and leaving package (this is the interesting part) +- 1.2M € at the age of 60. Flying the Q400 75-80h/month. Quite tiring (4 sectors per day), short turnarounds or enormous amount of duty but few block hours (around 10h duty for 5h block)

In summary, I can't complain but I doubt more and more that my company will still be there in 25years... They lack vision and are afraid to take any decision. Moreover, aviation in Europe is dead (career and money wise) except if you are willing to work for a LCC like Ryanair. Disgusting...

For info, don't tell me to go work in the UAE, I went there, took and passed the test at EK but finally refused to join the company at the end. Not sure I could have happily lived in the desert...

Voilà!

You know everything!
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Old 19th Dec 2016, 08:04   #24 (permalink)
 
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All of the answers to your questions can be found here:

Legacy | AirlinePilotCentral.com
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Old 19th Dec 2016, 10:26   #25 (permalink)
 
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In the US, you'll see a wide range of answers to your questions. It totally depends on aircraft, base, seniority, company etc. Pay is typically hourly. At many of the majors, $6000/month is about what you would make first year. I've got a friend who is pretty senior at United and his take home pay is approximately $25,000 a month after taxes, and he gets about 15 days off per month. Depending how hard you work and how you manipulate the system, I've heard of pay figures at the majors going as high as $45,000 per month (pretax), and in one extreme case at FedEx a pilot made $94,000 (pretax) in just one month. Of course that is at the extreme end but barring a bankruptcy, it is reasonable to expect to make between $190,000-$300,000 pretax at some point in your career at a major.

At the regional level, First year pay is now around $40,000-$60,000, and at my company it is reasonable for a captain with around 5-10 years to make $100,000 (all sims are pretax, as everyone's tax situation can vary). At the top end, there are guys making $120,000-200,000. The guys making $200,000 at the regionals are work aholics and are typically involved in the training department as well and do not take many days off.
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Old 19th Dec 2016, 11:01   #26 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Flykri View Post
I could as well get more in a European major (but they are not hiring...).
Quite a few of them are.
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Old 6th Jan 2017, 02:58   #27 (permalink)
 
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UAL 777


Was your date of hire 1985?
Therefore no college degree needed?

United indeed hired some no college educated pilots back then ......
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Old 6th Jan 2017, 17:16   #28 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by UAL777 View Post
At United, we don't have a defined retirement plan anymore. That was taken away in bankruptcy. We do have 16% contributed into a fund annually that compounds over time. I pay over 40% income tax including city, state, federal taxes. Then there is property tax on my house and the usual taxes on merchandise. Atleast in Europe, you get a real pension when you retire if I'm not mistaken. All in all, I'm happy and can't complain. United is where I will retire so I'm not chasing any other job.

When did you get hired without a degree? If within the last 15 years then you must be former mil or have some really impressive quals
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Old 6th Jan 2017, 20:29   #29 (permalink)
 
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Just in case anyone overseas wants to take a run at a dreadful US legacy carrier, I'll move Z B's green card info link down from that regional sticky at the top of this forum:

Pilots | OMS ? Foreign Healthcare Recruitment

Looks like a long shot but, what the heck ? Can't win if ya don't enter. ;-)))
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Old 7th Jan 2017, 03:15   #30 (permalink)
 
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You MUST have US Citizenship in order to apply to a US Legacy or Cargo Carrier. The Regionals will take you with permanent residency (green card). US Citizenship can take 10 years to obtain. So, that's you flying for a regional for 10+ years.
Ah, negative ghost rider. Not only untrue but illegal under US law. Worked at 2 Regionals and now at UAL, without US citizenship and just a Green Card.
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Old 7th Jan 2017, 09:35   #31 (permalink)
 
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Like Kenny said, DDMow: why don't you check your information before you state them as definite facts? That is simple not true. Legacies among other carriers require "Legal right to work in the United States" which is very different than US Citizenship. Now DoD contractor jobs like Dynamic require US Citizenship/Secret Clearance, like does FedEx (they carry US mail).
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Old 7th Jan 2017, 22:00   #32 (permalink)
 
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United still hires people without a 4 year degree although it's only a few. I was lucky I got hired without one in 2013
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Old 8th Jan 2017, 02:31   #33 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by UAL777 View Post
United still hires people without a 4 year degree although it's only a few. I was lucky I got hired without one in 2013
What was your quals ?
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Old 8th Jan 2017, 08:48   #34 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Some US airlines do have traditional A fund pensions,
and B fund pensions,
and 401Ks,
and sick bank buy outs,
and discounted stock purchase,
and medical,
and $300 an hour pay.
No other country on the planet can compete with that.
Usually said by people who have never worked outside their own, precious country. Enjoy your bubble!
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Old 8th Jan 2017, 13:49   #35 (permalink)
 
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"United still hires people without a 4 year degree although it's only a few. I was lucky I got hired without one in 2013"


UA published that they'd hired 3 people without college degrees amongst 1800 new hires. So it's possible but not probable.
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Old 8th Jan 2017, 19:22   #36 (permalink)
 
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Some of the guys posting here are over excited about airlines like United. Yes, it's a good company to work for but its very comparable to any large airline anywhere around the world, nothing special. Pay ranges from $85 hour as a new hire all the way up to $328 hour for senior widebody captains who have been here 25 years minimum. To be a 777 captain at UAL, one must be on property a minimum of 25-30 years. It's not like Qatar or Emirates where you become a 777 captain in 5 years. Annual salary is hourly rate times 1000 hours roughly and there is per diem and a b fund in which UAL contributes 16 percent. That's all you get. UAL 777/747/787 captains take home around the same amount net of taxes as a Qatar 777/787 captain. The only difference is that the UAL captain is 60 years old while the Qatar captain is in his/her 30's.. So who is really better off in the end?
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Old 9th Jan 2017, 10:04   #37 (permalink)
 
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No, that's not true. You can grab the left seat of a UAL WB at a relatively good age and still have more than a few good years left.

Personally, I would't work in Europe, Asia or the Gulf. It's not about the money (not that UAL doesn't pay well, they pay GREAT, if you know how to play the game, as do most of the major as well the big cargo players); it's about cabin crews, MRO, quality of life etc.

And don't forget: In aviation older is better (applies to flight deck, cabin crews, maintenance, you name it)
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Old 9th Jan 2017, 20:05   #38 (permalink)
 
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Don't know what you mean by not true. Most junior 777 CA at UAL has 25 years in the company. If you mean the 757/767 fleet, even that's 20 years for left seat. Even then you will be a reserve captain and most likely paid only monthly guarantee of 73 hours pay and per diem if you fly. Another thing I don't understand is the older employees being a positive thing in your opinion. I can understand cockpit crew being older probably means more experienced but how is having grandmas in the back working as cabin crew a positive thing? Anyhow to each his own but there are plenty of airlines around the world that offer equal or better terms and conditions in the big picture.
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Old 9th Jan 2017, 21:13   #39 (permalink)
 
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As far as qualifications, I got hired with 3,500 hours Total Time. 2,800 jet SIC. 1,000 hours on the A330 SIC. ATP, high school diploma, first class medical, FCC license. No command experience
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Old 14th Jan 2017, 20:51   #40 (permalink)
 
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pbi,

You said: "And to my airline for allowing me and my family to have the best career and life possible."

I think you answered UAL777's subjective question: "So who is really better off in the end?"

Lots of ways to skin this cat. :-))
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