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Who has actually converted an ICAO license to EASA and gotten a job in EU?

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Who has actually converted an ICAO license to EASA and gotten a job in EU?

Old 28th Aug 2019, 17:53
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Who has actually converted an ICAO license to EASA and gotten a job in EU?

Pretty much as the title states, who has managed to properly convert an ICAO license to EASA and land a job somewhere in the EU? I am currently sitting at just over 270 hours with a Canadian CPL and multi IFR and I have been swinging back and forth on the idea of getting my EASA license for quite a while now. Although I live in Canada, I have EU citizenship, a valid EU passport and I speak my mother tongue fluently so having the right to work and live in Europe is not an issue. I know the exams are hard, i've seen sample exams and that made me want to give up right there, but with enough effort the exams are doable (I mean there are a ton of pilots in Europe who got past them so...).

I'm just worried about dropping a tens of thousands of euros and then not actually landing any sort of job and being stuck a square zero again.
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Old 28th Aug 2019, 18:27
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Many pilots did.

Good luck with the EASA ATPL. Studying for them was easy and on, but preparing the actual exams was a depressing experience. I doubt some of those who write questions have ever been in an airplane as a passenger, let alone as a pilot.
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Old 28th Aug 2019, 19:20
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Yes without a doubt many pilots have, I see that you have your frozen ATPL, how did you get over the hurdle of writing the 14 exams?

And I would also agree that many of the questions are utterly pointless as they have little to no relevance when it comes to flying a plane, regardless of size, but until they change the standards or exam format, there's no other choice then to put up with the studying.
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Old 28th Aug 2019, 19:38
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The first thing I want to say is that you are deeply mistaken on the cost for a full license conversion.
​​​Everyone's living+travel expenses will be different obviously but I'm sitting at roughly 10kÄ total with a MCC course and PBN rating for a full CPL-MEIR conversion. That's everything except living cost.

Secondly; the process is long, the theory part will be by far the hardest. The market in Europe is not in the best shape but the market is cyclical and by the time you are ready to jump in it will be hiring frenzy again (I hope).

With that said it's worth it, in less than 2 months finishing my conversion I'm in a successful hold pool for a type-rating and planning for another assessment. In my country I waited years to get a PFO email. So take that as you want.

Good luck!
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Old 28th Aug 2019, 19:43
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Hawker, thanks for the info. I have pm'd you with some more questions
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Old 29th Aug 2019, 00:36
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As always, I STRONGLY advise you to STAY in Canada, and eventually have a nice career there.
if you insist on making a career in Europe I think youíll regret it.
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Old 29th Aug 2019, 07:30
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I managed to do it! Admittedly i had a reasonable amount of experience tho.

The exams are a pain in the butt, but doable in under a year part time (i took 5 months for the whole conversion, with full time work and new baby... but this was a real stretch and i don't recommend it!)

Europe doesn't have GA on the scale of Canada which makes finding a job different... most newbies here seem to go from an integrated course straight into a medium jet. Progression from GA to airlines seems to be very difficult because of this.
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Old 29th Aug 2019, 17:27
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Me. It was an expensive pain in the ass to do the exams and conversion, a difficult road to learn the language of my employer, but Iíve been here for 15 years and Iím not going back.
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 08:15
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It depends, I know several colleagues who came from Australia, US and Latam, and currently working in EU. However, there were 2 mayor factors I have noticed:
- the first is obviously the experience, so with 270hrs you won't make it, all of them came with over 2000hrs, and I might be wrong, but I guess EASA regulation requires 1500hr multicrew experience in order to start the license conversion.
- the second one, is all of them have either dual nationality (one of them being EU) or they are married with an EU citizen.

I know some companies would take care and help with the EASA conversion, on paperwork and cost. But I don't know if any company who helps you with the work/residence permit, since this process takes very long, maybe there are, but don't know any.
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 08:50
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Originally Posted by PilotRoger View Post
the first is obviously the experience, so with 270hrs you won't make it, all of them came with over 2000hrs, and I might be wrong, but I guess EASA regulation requires 1500hr multicrew experience in order to start the license conversion.
200 hours is the minimum requirement for a CPL, and that's what many have when they join an airline. Hours don't seem to matter like they do in some places and having too many can actually work against you. There certainly is no 1500 hour requirement.
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 10:35
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Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
200 hours is the minimum requirement for a CPL, and that's what many have when they join an airline. Hours don't seem to matter like they do in some places and having too many can actually work against you. There certainly is no 1500 hour requirement.

The 1500h requirement is for ATPL conversion. You need at least 1500TT with 500h on a multi-crew airplane in order to convert your ICAO ATPL into an EASA one.

I know several people who converted their licenses into EASA and are currently flying on many different airlines: Ryanair, EasyJet, Volotea, TAP, Norwegian, Air Baltic and etc...

But they all have dual citizenship (EU passport) or were sponsored by the airline like Ryanair did for some captains.
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 12:50
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Converted my Canadian ATPL to UK ATPL. Presently B787 Capt and TRI. TRE course soon and been with the same company for almost 25 years. They made me a B757 Capt at 30. Happy I left Canada? Damn right. Good luck, follow your dreams.
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