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“Dynamic maneuver” - Definition??

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“Dynamic maneuver” - Definition??

Old 10th Feb 2022, 13:30
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“Dynamic maneuver” - Definition??

Hello Everyone!

I’m a commercial pilot but English is not my native tongue. Could anyone native out there help me define what “dynamic maneuver” actually means? Im specifically talking about the Go-around which is always described as just that.

anyone?
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Old 10th Feb 2022, 17:23
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As a native English speaker, I find that it is quite frequent that I know exactly what a word means when it is put in a sentence but on the other hand, if someone asks for the definition of that word, it can require some thinking to figure it out. But here is some info about aircraft flight dynamics.

"What are the three dynamics of flight?

Flight dynamics is the science of air vehicle orientation and control in three dimensions. The three critical flight dynamics parameters are the angles of rotation in three dimensions about the vehicle's center of gravity (cg), known as pitch, roll and yaw."


The go-around involves a significant change in the pitch dynamic, more so than other changes such as top of descent, which is why it is mentioned more frequently in discussions about a go-around maneuver.

Airbus says this about the go-around "The “all engines” go-around is a very dynamic procedure". That is because it involves a significant pitch change in a short period of time and its effect on pilots has led to accidents, which, once again, is why the focus on the go-around phase of flight for dynamics.

Last edited by punkalouver; 10th Feb 2022 at 18:05.
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Old 10th Feb 2022, 18:07
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Simply put, I would say that it means a “moving movement”!

Not helpful, but that's English for you.

When the term 'dynamic manoeuvre' is used, I would suggest that it normally implies some sort of exaggerated change, not necessarily extreme, but definitely noticeable.

But really, I am with punkalouver , I know what it means but it would be difficult to explain (succinctly).

Good luck.
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Old 10th Feb 2022, 18:13
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Dynamic - Characterised by constant change, activity or progress.

Decision, TOGA, flaps, positive rate, gear, pitch, direction and speed control, FD, AP, MCDU, ATC = Constant change / activity / progress.
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Old 10th Feb 2022, 18:58
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CRM,
what is the context of the question, aircraft type, document ?
Sweden; Avro RJ uses the term in an emergency drill - takeoff, GA, … ?
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Old 10th Feb 2022, 19:01
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I think it means “get a move on!”.
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 03:03
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Let's take it in pieces.

"Dynamic" generally means "(of a process or system) characterized by constant change, activity, or progress." But beyond that, there is not a formal, aviation-wide definition of a dynamic maneuver. Means slightly different things in, say, airline flight, military formation flight, or helicopter flight.

For a go-around, "dynamic" applies to the activity in the cockpit - multiple crew actions to be initiated rapidly and virtually simultaneously. Already noted.

It also refers to the forces on the aircraft and crew - accelerations from thust change, pitch change, speed change and altitude change. In amounts somewhat more intense and rapid than stable flight.

Regarding the latter, those accelerations can be mistaken for one another due to somatogravic illusions: if one is being pushed back in seat 0A or 0B, is that due to forward acceleration from high engine thrust in straight and level flight - OR - due to a high pitch angle (possibly even with decaying airspeed)? Or both?

They were probably a factor in the go-arounds that ended in pitchdowns right into the center of the runway

(Yeah, yeah, I know - we're supposed to be Iron-Willed Sky Gods who never get fooled by "seat-of-the-pants" sensations and our inner ear. But we're fighting millions of years of evolution to do that - so it's still aways a risk factor).

Regarding the former - how many cases in the past few years have there been of go-arounds initiated - and the crew forgot to, or otherwise failed to, fully activate TOGA or otherwise increase thrust, and lost speed precipitously?

Incident: Austrian E195 at Salzburg on Oct 27th 2017, go around without thrust

Or forgot to allow for pitch-up from underwing engines, and also got close to stalls?

I guess the summary would be that a dynamic maneuver is "a maneuver involving a rapidly changing situation, both as to procedures, and aircraft movements, that will require maximum mental focus and situational awareness to accomplish successfully."
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 05:10
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It's been answered adequately. Dynamic Vs Static. Static is like climb, descent straight and level. Even to change from straight and level to descend or climb the change is in one dimension with gradual decrease or increase in thrust. GA no doubt very dynamic as the pitch, thrust changes are large and rapid also thrust change adding to pitch change and acceleration acting ón the aircraft.
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 05:35
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It's not a scientific term and I've never heard anyone refer to a static maneuver. It's an oxymoron.

Dynamic maneuver a colloquial term that means there's a lot going on.
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 06:31
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I'm a non-native English speaker (agravated by the fact that I'm Spanish!), and this is how I explain it to my non-native English speakers students in the sim:

Dynamic maneouver is when, to maintain a constant output (for example V2+10 on take off), you have to keep changing and adjusting the input (pitch attitude) due to the constant changes in the factors that affect that input (less thrust with higher altitude, raising the gear, deflection of the flight controls that create drag, etc...). Leaving the input unchanged doesn't guarantee an unchanged output as well.

This seems to help them understand that concept. Or at the very least, they stop frowning...
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 09:29
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I think the first reply got closest.

How about: If all the forces acting on an aircraft sum to zero, then it’s Static. Every other case is Dynamic.
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 09:55
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Agree it's a pleonasm, but no harm done. Well familiar with cautions, alerts and warnings, having a manoeuvre described as 'benign', 'dynamic', or 'abrupt' is easy to chew on. Althouhg 'very dynamic' makes more sense.

What concerns me more is the definition of 'static manoeuvre'. Perhaps that'S what we missed on the conveyor thread.
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 10:23
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Oh, how the flying world has been taken over by the overdetailed self-protection brigade..........

Once upon a time a "dynamic maneuver"(sic) would have consisted of a 7G pull to the vertical, mid crowd on the A axis, a four-point roll, followed then by a cravat to the downline etc.

An overshoot (go around) was a way of getting out of a screwed up approach !
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 11:21
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Originally Posted by awair View Post
Simply put, I would say that it means a “moving movement”!

Not helpful, but that's English for you.

When the term 'dynamic manoeuvre' is used, I would suggest that it normally implies some sort of exaggerated change, not necessarily extreme, but definitely noticeable.

But really, I am with punkalouver , I know what it means but it would be difficult to explain (succinctly).

Good luck.

A "moving movement" would he "kinetic movement", no? Dynamic means "changing", as opposed to "static"
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 11:26
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It means "there is a lot of stuff changing, don't **** it up!"
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 12:52
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I’m so great full for all the answers guys. I’m more this satisfied and I got a hang of it now.

We are transitioning to another flight phase and there is a lot going on with rapid increases of thrust, large changes in pitch, simultaneous actions such as configuration change, gear retraction etc. A secondary effect of that is a rapid increase in workload accompanied by somatogravic sensations, onset of stress etc. So, in short. Be diligent during the approach to be prepared for the Go-around as a highly dynamic maneuver. I learned some new words as well. Like, “colloquial” and “pleonasm” 😂.

All the best guys
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Old 11th Feb 2022, 13:25
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Originally Posted by iggy View Post
I'm a non-native English speaker (agravated by the fact that I'm Spanish!), and this is how I explain it to my non-native English speakers students in the sim:

Dynamic maneouver is when, to maintain a constant output (for example V2+10 on take off), you have to keep changing and adjusting the input (pitch attitude) due to the constant changes in the factors that affect that input (less thrust with higher altitude, raising the gear, deflection of the flight controls that create drag, etc...). Leaving the input unchanged doesn't guarantee an unchanged output as well.

This seems to help them understand that concept. Or at the very least, they stop frowning...
Sounds overly complex.

In the end, the OP doesn't have the same command of English as most of us and is wondering what companies such as Airbus(not an expert in English when it comes to their publications) mean when they use it in terms of a go-around. He may not be interested in the nitpicking details of exact definitions.

You can read up about A300-600 and A310 go-arounds to find out why a go-around has been put in the category by some(such as Airbus) as a very dynamic maneuver. Because some pilots found themselves feeling like they were riding a rocket. That being said, some go-arounds are not so dynamic.

It also appears to be a word that easily has different interpretations by English speakers.

Last edited by punkalouver; 11th Feb 2022 at 13:44.
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Old 13th Feb 2022, 15:27
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You have static maneuver when you have a steady acceleration and a steady pitch rate...equilibrium with aerodynamic, thrust, and inertial loading...

A dynamic maneuver involves applying some form of control input in such a way that a transient (time-varying) response of the aircraft is generated.

Source: Aircraft loading and Structural Layout...Denis Howe

Last edited by turbidus; 14th Feb 2022 at 13:27.
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