Spectators Balcony (Spotters Corner) If you're not a professional pilot but want to discuss issues about the job, this is the best place to loiter. You won't be moved on by 'security' and there'll be plenty of experts to answer any questions.

Best sunglasses

Old 27th Jun 2019, 08:34
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: EGLL
Posts: 477
For Aviating, definitely Bigatmo. Unsurpassed.
G-ARZG is offline  
Old 27th Jun 2019, 10:46
  #22 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: France
Posts: 507
Originally Posted by G-ARZG View Post
For Aviating, definitely Bigatmo. Unsurpassed.
What is it that makes them so suitable for aviation ?
KayPam is offline  
Old 30th Jun 2019, 18:59
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: LEEDS
Posts: 997
Today, I bought some Remaldi Harrison aviator sunspecs for the princely sum of eight quid. It turns out they were made by an optical firm just half a mile from here. If they protect my eyes and don't give me a headache (which my last ones did) then I'll be satisfied. I've had Foster Grant's in recent years - inexpensive and quite durable.
Mooncrest is offline  
Old 26th Jul 2019, 14:35
  #24 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: France
Posts: 507
In the end, I chose cat 3 polarized maui jim glasses, and another pair for summer, maui jim frames with cat 4 lenses.
KayPam is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2020, 13:58
  #25 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: France
Posts: 507
Originally Posted by El Bunto View Post
Most phones made since about 2012 have an integrated barometer...

But to me the problem seems to be that you don't have a definite list of requirements. You'll never manage to buy a satisfactory product if you just buy the one with the longest checklist of features.

Take your Garmin D2 watch; all those functions mean that it is not optimised for one single function. It doesn't have a thermally-stabilised quartz oscillator, for example, so it isn't accurate as a chronometer. Eventually I think you'll hit the limits of the compromised functions and become dissatisfied.

In general it's better to buy a single optimised product for each specific use-case and leave the all-in-ones on the shelf.
One year later, I figure out you were completely right.

My sunglasses just broke when I put them off and closed them.
I'm now considering to buy a new model, and I've been able to put down a definite list of requirements.
Any optician looks at me with goggly eyes when I list all 8 :

- Between 7 and 11% of transmittance, for optical comfort
- A curved mount, for the same reason
- A slightly adjustable mount, to increase the optical comfort and leave no place in the field of view unprotected
- Unpolarized glass, because it does not work very well in the 320 (doable, but not great, not great either with my tablet or phone)
- Correct width, just a bit larger than my head (that's for physical and audio comfort, with a headset such as the A20)
- Interior anti reflective coating, that's just mandatory, I do not want to have any visual parasite due to interior light reflections...
- Mineral glass or at least hardened plastic, since I want to keep high end sunglasses for a long time.
And
- Unmirrored glass, mount with a sober look (that's just looks so not definitive, but it still has to go with a pilot uniform, so nothing too fancy allowed..)

I looked into bigatmo, it seems pretty good, except the transmittance which they don't tell about.
Measuring the transmittance is very easy, just install an app like "light meter" on any smartphone, and divide the lighting value shown with the glasses on the sensor by the value shown without the glasses. Easy as pie, but it requires having the object in our hands.
And the critera "unmirrored" can be opposed to the critera 7-11% because the mirror can help reduce the transmittance..
It is not mineral glass but they claim it's extremely hard plastic, I think I have to give up a bit on my critera if I don't want to end up paying 600 or more for "made to measure" glasses.

Any thoughts, since there are many users of bigatmo on this forum ? Thanks
KayPam is offline  
Old 26th Jul 2020, 11:24
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 1,440
I still have a couple of pairs of Air Ministry issue (yes, that long ago) and, obviously they are quite good but the best, for me, by far, were 'Renault Sea & Ski Spectaculars', bought in Vientiane in the early 60s. Don't know if they are still made , but their advantage was the distortionless wrap-around lenses - cutting out that side-lighting makes a huge difference. Sadly they were smashed at work in Cyprus.
Cornish Jack is online now  
Old 26th Jul 2020, 15:36
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: EGLL
Posts: 477
Weren't we all, weren't we all! (smashed at work in Cyprus, that is)

Last edited by G-ARZG; 26th Jul 2020 at 21:18.
G-ARZG is offline  
Old 27th Jul 2020, 11:12
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 1,440
Can't imagine such a thing! Admittedly, an overdose of Kokinelli (more than half a glass) could cause problems, but we used to go for the higher quality stuff from our local grocer - 1s 9d a bottle!
Cornish Jack is online now  
Old 29th Jul 2020, 17:05
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: UK
Posts: 1,660
Whatever the make and model, it is most important to check that sunglasses are certified to be UV blocking.

If they are not, then owing to the dark lens tint, the pupils of the eyes open wider so actually more UV gets into the eye, where it can cause more damage

I personally found that sunglasses render the displays of A320 family too dark, (I think our company ran them dim to save money replacing them). I had better success seeing the screens with graduated tint, clear at the bottom. But sunglasses are too much of a pain for me to bother with : the Airbus blind or moveable brown perspex screen, depending on which aircraft, works for me 90% of the time.
Uplinker is offline  
Old 30th Jul 2020, 11:56
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: I wouldn't know.
Posts: 4,276
I use Zeiss Skylet glasses and usually a more wrap around frame with them that block out most of the light entering from the side. Have used them since my gliding days over 20 years ago, since they block most of the blue light they enable a much better cloud identification and a much clearer view. One thing to note is, on switching from the 737 to the A320 i had to switch from 90% absorbance to 75% as the airbus screens are so very bad compared to those used by Boeing. Not only size, but also the available range of brightness. In total those kinda glasses are not cheap, i usually pay from €600 upwards, my current set is over 1k as i am getting into the age where i need multifocal lenses...
Denti is offline  
Old 1st Aug 2020, 14:11
  #31 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: France
Posts: 507
Originally Posted by Denti View Post
I use Zeiss Skylet glasses and usually a more wrap around frame with them that block out most of the light entering from the side. Have used them since my gliding days over 20 years ago, since they block most of the blue light they enable a much better cloud identification and a much clearer view. One thing to note is, on switching from the 737 to the A320 i had to switch from 90% absorbance to 75% as the airbus screens are so very bad compared to those used by Boeing. Not only size, but also the available range of brightness. In total those kinda glasses are not cheap, i usually pay from 600 upwards, my current set is over 1k as i am getting into the age where i need multifocal lenses...
Can you find glasses already built with this lens type ?
I would be interested to see how it looks like !
KayPam is offline  
Old 7th Aug 2020, 15:50
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: 119N204W
Posts: 10
I have tried them, and they are amazing.
BCMG CAVOK is offline  
Old 8th Aug 2020, 13:07
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: West London
Posts: 353
Best pair I ever had were from McDonalds, and cost me 1.
Geezers of Nazareth is offline  
Old 9th Aug 2020, 16:37
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In the sticks
Posts: 8,377
Let these be your guide

https://www.aircraftcompare.com/blog...es-for-pilots/

https://www.caa.co.uk/Aeromedical-Ex...es-for-pilots/

https://transair.co.uk/pilot-supplies/pilot-sunglasses
LTNman is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2020, 09:44
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Newcastle
Age: 50
Posts: 589
Originally Posted by Hot 'n' High View Post
KayPam, the best glasses are ..... the cheapest!
Or Free. I found a pair of spring loaded Ralph Lauren back in 1999. I still have them and use them for driving.
MATELO is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2020, 10:35
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: attitude is nominal
Posts: 1,461
I'd prefer non polarized because polarized ones can black out cockpit displays. Go for neutral grey glass instead and pick the right size for your face.
https://aoeyewear.com/sizing/
Less Hair is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2020, 18:02
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 44
Another one here for Serengeti drivers gradient. Not polarised. Just lighter at the bottom of the lens so you can see your instruments at night.
zoigberg is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.