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Ryanair rather speedy?

Old 3rd Jan 2019, 14:36
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Ryanair rather speedy?

I suspect that this has probably been done to death in previous threads but....

I flew on two Ryanair flights yesterday, my third and fourth flights with that airline in total. Bearing in mind that although I fly frequently, I am usually in an A320 family machine so a 737-800 may be different, but I thought that our approach speed (in the last 10-15 seconds before landing) seemed to be much faster than any other flight I have taken. I was not aware of any particular weather conditions that would have accounted for this.

What did not surprise me was the heavy braking action after the wheels hit the ground. It sounded like full reverse (not idle) and certainly the heavy footwear was applied to the brakes. I was thrown forward and only the lap belt restrained me for several seconds from hitting the seat in front.

Heavy landings I understand and can accept, but was what I experienced normal for RYR? Is this them saving a few seconds to complete a rapid turnaround?
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 15:47
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Originally Posted by Espada III View Post
What did not surprise me was the heavy braking action after the wheels hit the ground. It sounded like full reverse (not idle) and certainly the heavy footwear was applied to the brakes. I was thrown forward and only the lap belt restrained me for several seconds from hitting the seat in front.

Heavy landings I understand and can accept, but was what I experienced normal for RYR? Is this them saving a few seconds to complete a rapid turnaround?
Depending on the airport layout (you don't say where you were landing), the difference between making a particular runway exit and missing it can amount to considerably more than "a few seconds".
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 16:00
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737-800 has higher landing and approach speeds than the A320 family - that is why it has often more payload & performance limitations - you do not see them at SOU for instance
and FR are going to operating from SEN next summer - I will watch with interest on whether 787-800 Loc-co high density ops from there will work or not in the real time
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 00:16
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Definitely worth a complaint to dear Michael.

Your Dom and Beluga could quite easily have shot orf and landed on the Witherbottoms' somewhat sparse pates. More consideration required from the cruise next time please.

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Old 4th Jan 2019, 09:44
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Not sure what jimjim1 means.

Landing into Milan Bergamo and Manchester. Both flights had what I felt were fast approaches, but Manchester's braking was very intense. I suppose they wanted to reach the Termainal 3 gates without too much backtracking?
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 09:52
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If you are used to flying in the A320 family then you will notice that the 737-800/MAX family has higher approach speeds 140-160 Kts over the fence (dependent on landing weight, weather, plus accepting any tailwind) so not just Ryanair flights
This makes for a much noticeable faster approach and the 738 has a tendency to eat up the flare
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 11:32
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Thank you. As a passenger I do prefer the A320 to the 737. The seating and especially the aisle are that little bit wider on the Airbus. And is it me, but the windows seemed to be lower up the wall in the 737 than the A320, making me need to duck my head whenever I wanted to properly look at something out of the window.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 10:31
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Espada , 2 years ago , we noticed that we had to bend down to look out of the windows on an American 737-800 . Mmm I thought , didn't have to do that on company 737-200s , 300s , or 400s . The fuselage barrels are the same from -100s to Max series , so very odd . Then it clicked , I'm guessing that the seats are higher off the floor than previous series .... Thus giving more apparent legroom with a higher density seat layout , i.e. seats closer together !
Well that's our thoughts on it .

rgds condor .
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 12:22
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Who else read the title of this thread and thought it was going to be about RYR taxiing speeds
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 13:00
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Yeah....me over here !!!!!
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 16:35
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Think with landing techniques are different- short field Boeing encourages and get it down and stopped approach. As others have said faster approach and more tendency to float that the Airbus series.
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Old 27th Jan 2019, 10:46
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At Manchester the Ryanair flights landing on 23R usually try to make the second RET. A Flap 30 approach would be carried out typically at around 148kts before any adjustment fo wind. Autobrake 3, which is the second highest level would normally suffice for this scenario.

The Ryanair SOP closely follows the Boeing advice if I understand correctly, which is to flare at 30 feet, cut the power at 10 feet and hold attitude for a firm landing in the correct touchdown area. Any attempt to finesse the landing can lead to a long flare.

I speak as a non-pilot but as someone closely involved in Ryanair sim assessments for cadet pilots ten years ago via a fixed base 737-800 simulator so I did gain a fair understanding of procedures during that time, but am happy to be corrected on the above.
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Old 27th Jan 2019, 13:39
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My understanding is that RYR are hot on landings in the touch down zone irrespective of whether they’re gentle or not.

The 737-800 is also not the easiest thing to land, with high approach speeds and a slippery wing.

The evidence is entirely anecdotal but I’ve never had a touchdown in an Ryanair aircraft that didn’t range from firm to downright planted.
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Old 29th Jan 2019, 11:29
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Originally Posted by reverserunlocked View Post
My understanding is that RYR are hot on landings in the touch down zone irrespective of whether they’re gentle or not.
That's why it's called the "touchdown zone"! That is where everyone you be aiming to touchdown.
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Old 29th Jan 2019, 18:42
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Originally Posted by reverserunlocked View Post
My understanding is that RYR are hot on landings in the touch down zone
I would expect every airline to be hot on landing in the touch down zone. At my operator it is a mandatory go around if you are not going to touch down in the landing zone

At Manchester you might get away with it, I'm not going to try and find out, at Madeira you might go over the end of the runway extension that is supported on stilts and die.
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Old 2nd Feb 2019, 07:30
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Originally Posted by Espada III View Post
Not sure what jimjim1 means.

Landing into Milan Bergamo and Manchester. Both flights had what I felt were fast approaches, but Manchester's braking was very intense. I suppose they wanted to reach the Termainal 3 gates without too much backtracking?
Very rare to need to backtrack at all at MAN, unless taxiway works are underway.
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Old 3rd Feb 2019, 22:15
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Originally Posted by reverserunlocked View Post
The evidence is entirely anecdotal but I’ve never had a touchdown in an Ryanair aircraft that didn’t range from firm to downright planted.
Which merely indicates that Ryanair are apparently consistent at landing their 737s correctly... surely you'd expect nothing else from a Professionally trained and operated company?
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Old 4th Feb 2019, 08:40
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@Wycombe. Me too. Bit disappointed it isnt but maybe a !ittle thread drift will get us there.
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