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Korean Air

Old 19th Sep 2019, 06:22
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Korean Air

Could somebody currently on contract with Korean on the 330 through Rishworth please get in touch? I am considering the standard commuting option out of London Heathrow. Particularly interested in the roster, commuting, training system. I've read all the old threads but they are just that, old. Any information much appreciated.

I need to start commuting for personal reasons and am just looking for up to date information on how it all is. Thanks.
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Old 20th Sep 2019, 03:03
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You mean the thread that started in 2016 and has posts in 2019 is to old?

The agency would have given you a sample roster and gone through everything with you already.

I will give you a quick version. Some people like it some dont. The training is tedious and if you dont do it their way you are gone. The locals report everything you do to management and they dont want you there either.

Keep your head down, do your job and dont complain then you will be fine.

All of that was on PPRuNe.
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Old 20th Sep 2019, 03:19
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Thanks for the detailed reply. Are you currently working there pilotchute?
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Old 20th Sep 2019, 06:54
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Ditto what pilotchute said, like all asian flying jobs your a paid mercenary, if you can accept that there way is the only way and get on with it you will be fine. Anything else your quality of life will deteriorate pretty fast and most likely they will find a way to hound you out. Attitude seems to be number one here.
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Old 20th Sep 2019, 17:41
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Originally Posted by BAe 146-100 View Post
Ditto what pilotchute said, like all asian flying jobs your a paid mercenary, if you can accept that there way is the only way and get on with it you will be fine. Anything else your quality of life will deteriorate pretty fast and most likely they will find a way to hound you out. Attitude seems to be number one here.
Thanks 146, much appreciated.
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Old 20th Sep 2019, 18:21
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Friend was there briefly. He moved on to AJX.
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Old 20th Sep 2019, 18:43
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Star Ferry, see your private messages, hope it helps.
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Old 25th Sep 2019, 09:04
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concerning the tax, Korean is paying taxes for you in Korea? Easy to get the appropriate papers in order to provide prove of that in your country of residence?
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Old 25th Sep 2019, 13:00
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Yes tax is paid at 18.7% (IIRC) and the advertised salary is net.

Your contract agency will provide you with documentation that you can use to claim tax relief in a country where you are resident for tax purposes. Worth pointing out that some countries have taxation agreements where you only pay tax in Korea with some other states wanting their fair share too. It's worth taking time to study the tax laws carefully that will affect you, since anything you can do to legally limit your tax exposure will literally pay dividends!

I see you are in Europe so off the top of my head, Ireland, Italy, Austria and Denmark are countries where you have no tax obligation to pay at home. There may be other countries too.
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Old 25th Sep 2019, 13:08
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Thanks Emma, you're Correct that its good to do some study before, my country has an agreement with Korea so no need to pay tax here then, just need some paperwork. agency told me they look after it but it's nice to get a confirmation ;-)
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Old 29th Sep 2019, 10:18
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Pilot Hams,

Enma is totally right. But study the tax agreement between your country and Kora in detail. MOST important think to consider is that you will NOT be tax resident in Korea even though you will pay taxes in the country and they will provide you a tax certificate report. The money already paid in Korea will be substracted to your home country income tax bill. Each country can be different.
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Old 30th Sep 2019, 16:03
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Two different things here - Emma/hans, are you saying that if you are resident in Denmark or Austria, and you have proof that the 18.7% has been paid in Korea, then Denmark/Austria would not ask for a penny more? (even though tax in Denmark is much much higher)?I had always dismissed the Korean pay as much too low, but if that's true, then it's worth consideration.
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Old 30th Sep 2019, 16:15
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I was emailed a list of countries a couple of years ago which detailed their tax arrangements with South Korea with respect to the KAL contract.

Denmark and Austria were on the list of countries where the only tax liability was in South Korea, with no Danish or Austrian tax being due.

Tread with caution and carry out your own research to verify if this is still the case.
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Old 1st Oct 2019, 17:04
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Emma, the info I have been given is that tax is paid at a rate of 20.9% of the gross income earned (a rate of 26.42% of the NET income). You are supplied with a tax certificate which (assuming your country of residence has a dual taxation agreement with South Korea) may be used to offset tax payments in your country of residence, where you would pay the balance if any.
As a rough guide comparing the tax on the gross income to the tax and National Insurance rates for example in the UK I think you would still be left with a tax liability in the UK of something like 27,000 sterling a year.

Can anybody enlighten me or confirm my thinking is correct?
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Old 2nd Oct 2019, 08:50
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It just all depends on you country of residence.. I have spoken here to the tax authorities and I have a written confirmation that with the the taxation agreement between Korea and my county of residence they will not tax me extra here! I I would work in Japan, they will tax me the full here in my country of residence. another example if I would work in Qatar, then they would charge me 25%. So all in all, a good research is required and it's very different fo all the country's
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Old 6th Oct 2019, 17:03
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A to Z, please check your PMs.... thanks again
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Old 8th Oct 2019, 20:58
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Originally Posted by Star Ferry View Post
Emma, the info I have been given is that tax is paid at a rate of 20.9% of the gross income earned (a rate of 26.42% of the NET income). You are supplied with a tax certificate which (assuming your country of residence has a dual taxation agreement with South Korea) may be used to offset tax payments in your country of residence, where you would pay the balance if any.
As a rough guide comparing the tax on the gross income to the tax and National Insurance rates for example in the UK I think you would still be left with a tax liability in the UK of something like 27,000 sterling a year.

Can anybody enlighten me or confirm my thinking is correct?
Thanks for that correction. The info I quoted was a few years old.

If you have two homes in different countries, then it is worth looking at your taxation situation very carefully, as it is feasible and perfectly legal to not be tax resident anywhere, providing you are savvy enough with the relevant tax legislation.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 10:41
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Originally Posted by Emma Royds View Post
as it is feasible and perfectly legal to not be tax resident anywhere, providing you are savvy enough with the relevant tax legislation.
Yeah, sure!

Death & Taxes...

But hey, maybe you're savvy and you will succeed where many others have lost all their retirement savings and then some! Good luck with that.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 12:26
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Originally Posted by Emma Royds View Post
Thanks for that correction. The info I quoted was a few years old.

If you have two homes in different countries, then it is worth looking at your taxation situation very carefully, as it is feasible and perfectly legal to not be tax resident anywhere, providing you are savvy enough with the relevant tax legislation.
Simply no way. Deduct an average 35% on the salary and you’ll be pretty close, no matter where you reside
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 17:42
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I beg to differ.

If you legally do not meet the residency criteria for tax purposes in countries that you have a home in, then where does your tax liability lie?

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