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Eva Air, Taiwan

Old 23rd Oct 2012, 09:04
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Home
Posts: 133
Hi All,

I too would be extremely grateful to anyone who is able to provide more info regarding the current Eva package, rostering and interview prep.

Thanks in advance.
Cheers,
Cav.
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Old 24th Oct 2012, 11:10
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Here, there and everywhere.
Posts: 53
EVA Screening October 2012

Dear Ladies and Gents,

My apologies for the delay in posting my recent interview experience with EVA, but here it goes.

Travelling to Taiwan:

EVA will fly you on their acft for free from any of the cities they operate. In my case I flew from LAX to TPE. They´ll issue an Economy Deluxe ticket, which is just slightly better than the normal economy seat (sorry no C-class). The cost of flying from your home country / base to an EVA destination is on you for which the company will "reimburse" you up to NTD 10.000 (around USD 300) in cash when you arrive in TPE. In my case it costed me around USD 2.000 to get to LAX, so quite a high cost and investment in order to get to the screening.

After arriving in TPE you´ll have to take a cab to EVA´s head quarters which will cost you around USD 10-15. Cab drivers speak very basic if any english so be sure to print the map sent to you by EVA´s HR. It will have the directions written both in English and Chinese.

Accomodation:

You´ll be placed in EVA´s pilot quarter building in a semi-hotel like small apartment which is located within the EVA training / operations / HR / Management complex. Overall quite organized, but do not expect anything very fancy or luxurious, afterall despite beeing a different country, it´s very China-like (for those familiar with the country you´ll know what I mean). The room will be OK for a 5-day stay, having internet and even a basic in-house Gym. So in terms of accomodation keeping a low expectation will result in no disappointment. In terms of eating, EVA has their own restaurant and cafeteria, but I always went out for luch and dinner as across the street there´s a reasonable little mall with a few Thai, Indian, Italian, Japanese, German and Local cuisine restaurants and these are not very expensive. EVA will pay for your breakfast and lunch only at their restaurant, but again based on my experience with Chinese Cuisine I didn´t care to use this "benefit". If you´re like me and have strict diet requirements and healthy eating habits, I recommend bringing your own cereals, bread, fruit bars, supplements, etc, as these items are not easy to find around there.

Overall as far as the company and it´s infrastructure is concerned I admit I was positively surprised and EVA seems quite organized (again, I´m comparing it to China and South America).

The screening:

First day starts with the SIM assessment. Done in the B747-400 and lasts around 45 minutes only. If you´re rated on it they´ll expect you to know the acft, if you´re not don´t worry as they´ll go through a short 30 minutes briefing before the assessment covering basic stuff such as pitchXpower, engine out procedures, how to read the B744 PFD and basic acft handling. Use your current company´s callouts and SOP´s if you´re rated. If not, I strongly recommend taking a look at the B747-400 FCTM at least. You´ll have an experienced EVA FO seating on the left seat and he will probably be always ahead of you so a big help...use him as your friend and be sure to communicate clearly.

SIM profile will be a normal take off and climb straight ahead to 3000´ AT and FD on, no AP. Clean up, accelerate to 250kt. You´ll then disconnect the AT and turn the FD off and will do 1000´/min climbs and descents, accelerate to 280kt, normal and steep turns (read the FCTM)...all in manual (AP, FD and AT off). After they´re satisfied with your basic handling skills you´ll be placed in the downwind leg for a visual landing...no tricks and no 30kt crosswinds as the Chinese airlines like to do. No take off or approach briefings are required, but remember to ask for the normal check lists and do your callouts.

A second normal take off with vectors for an ILS low visibility. Again no tricks, straight forward manual ILS approach with FD on. Full stop landing.

A third take off with a V1 cut of an outboard engine. At 400´ and when stable they´ll freeze the SIM and put you in an intercept heading for a final landing, again no AP / AT but with FD on. That´s it, very straight forward standard SIM assessment. BUT, I think it is the most important part of the screening. Overall a very relaxed, professional and pleasant atmosphere during the whole SIM and you´ll get notified if you pass or not right after...no waiting and biting your fingernails in your room!

In the afternoon you´ll do a tech exam with 50 questions covering general ATPL knowledge. A lot of WX related stuff, so study your METAR and TAF codes well. Apparently this test hasn´t been updated or checked very thoroughly so you´ll notice a few wrong answers at the end when you return your papers and it gets checked. I´m pretty sure I got way over 90% correctly, but ended up with a mere 82% success...due to these wrong answers, so if you feel wronged and injusticed it´s up to you either to argue or not with the HR people monitoring the test (remember they´re not pilots and probably will not understand half of what you´re talking about anyway). The minimum for a pass is 70%, so in my case, as I didn´t see any point in arguing, I just disregarded the obvious typos and errors in the test and pretended I was happy with the result.

On the second day you´re in for the interview. A 3-man panel with 2 pilots from management and someone from HR. First a 5 min personnal introduction, then the questions start coming. Again, if you´re rated you´ll be asked question about the B744, if not they may ask something about the acft you´re currently operating so be prepared. I´m rated and was even asked quite detailed questions about my previous types (A320)! Be prepared to answer questions about limitations, SOP´s (widshear, GPWS, TCAS and emergency descent maneuvers), as well as acft general system knowledge.

Additionally to these subjects above, my tech interview was heavily based on other issues like RNAV, RNP, CAT 2, Oceanic Ops, RVSM contingencies (WX deviations and emergencies), GO / NO-GO decisions (RTO), pilot incapacitation, weather radar operation. All these were asked from me and as far as I know from the other candidates as well. I strongly recommend studying well your current FCTM, FCOM, FOM and SOP´s as well as general ATPL subjects (and for those already asking...NO I don´t think ACE will be enough unless you already master all above mentioned knowledge). At the end they may ask you what you know about the company, so here´s your chance to make an impression! They even asked me what type I would like to be placed in (in order of priority) and when could I start.

You´ll be notified early in the afternoon if you passed the interview and if positive, you´ll have an ICAO english test, regardless of already having the endorsement on your license. Very straight foward and standard test / interview lasting around 45 minutes.

On the last 2 days you´ll go for the Taiwanese Aviation Medical, which is quite thorough. It will start early each the morning. The first day will be long and you´ll be off after 5pm, and on the second day around noon. The schedule will naturally depend a bit on how many candidates will be doing the exams, but this is pretty close to what you should expect. The medical will be held at the Taiwan International Airport, which is in downtown Taipei, so a good chance to visit the city after you´re done on the second day! EVA will drive you there each morning, but the return to the company´s quarters will be at your own expense either by bus (cheap) or taxi (around USD 30). I chose the latter is it was much faster, but public transportation seemed quite decent and organized (good subway system by the way in my opinion). For those wondering...the Taiwanese Authorities accept LASIK without restrictions...I asked at the Hospital during my eye exams as there´s a thread on PPRuNe regarding this issue with Asian carriers, and I thought it would be nice to know anyway.

I did my screening back in the beginning of october, and so far not a word from EVA regarding course dates or medical results. HR did indeed mention to us during the screening that recruitment would be slowing down towards the end of the year and that at the time EVA didn´t have an exact course date set yet...maybe november or december the earliest.

Regarding the contract´s terms and conditions, what we received was a very basic draft contract which has already been discussed here at PPRuNe, but one thing I think is worth mentioning...training bond is 4 years and USD 60.000. Now, we all know you can get a full B744 TR at Lufthansa in Frankfurt for a third of that price, and training is done in-company at EVA (no high training costs, so not sure why such a high bond), so it´s up to each man to decide whether it´s worth signing the contract or not. But remember, you´ll get a SIC restricted Taiwanese license which AFAIK is not very well accepted by foreign Civil Aviation Authorities around the world. Just something to think about.

As soon as I receive the full details of the contract I will be sure to post them here (if I get an employment offer naturally).

Hope this helps and feel free to PM me for any other details I may have overlooked. Remember this was how my screening was done and it may have been different for other groups.

The best of luck to all!

Upspeed.

Last edited by upspeed; 24th Oct 2012 at 11:23.
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Old 25th Oct 2012, 00:35
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South, near the end of the world.
Age: 45
Posts: 261
Three years will literally fly, so If I were you, I would not worry about, specially If you don't want to pay in advance the TR.

When I had joined CAL back in 2007 I had to deposit U$D 21,500- in a Taiwanese Bank account at the moment I had started my ground school.
The money was frozen for three years after my line check

If I were you, I would choose the Airbus fleet, the Mighty Queen is a really beautiful plane for flying but it is a dead end in the middle term.

Last edited by cosmiccomet; 25th Oct 2012 at 00:36.
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Old 25th Oct 2012, 01:30
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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Upspeed..

no comparison between taiwan and china. the reason for the high bond? Very simple...in the past I would say prior to 2007 or 6, there's was no bond(money paid to an airlines) but it was some expats that jumped the bond after receiving some type experience...therefore who to blame?

The infrastructures is by far more organized then any, if not all of S. American countries..and of course China..

Last edited by etops777; 25th Oct 2012 at 01:31.
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Old 25th Oct 2012, 02:40
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Here, there and everywhere.
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@cosmiccomet:

I agree with you that the Airbus or even the 777 (not likely) would be better options than the B744, however it's up to EVA where they'll put you according to company needs and this was made quite clear during the screening, so not much choice there. Regarding the training bond, I understood that it wouldn't be payed by the employee during this initial 4 years (no salary deductions like in some airlines), but it would be decreased to zero pro rata at a certain rate after joining. If you leave before the 4 years, you pay the residual and so forth. But then again, we did not receive any specific details about the contract so I'll have to wait and see how it works once and if offered employment.

@etops777:

I didn't write that Taiwan was like China, but that EVA and it's infrastructure seemed quite organized when compared to other Airlines in China and South America. As for overall social infrastructure of Taiwan as a whole, having spent only 5 days in one city doesn't make me an expert, but it did SEEM to be very well organized, and I can say for sure that in no South American country there is a general infrastructure like what a saw in Taiwan or in even China (worked 1 year there). Having lived in 2 of the most developed countries in South America and flown all over that region for over 6 years I will agree with you 100%.

Nevertheless, I am only comparing infraestructure such as airports, ports, public transport, urban organization, etc. As far as quality of life is concerned, which IMHO is a much more complex and broader subject, many other facts and issues have to be taken into account, maybe too many to be discussed in this thread.

As for training bonds, I do agree with you that these are necessary, especially if the numbers are reasonable, but USD 60.000 is a very high ammount and I believe that there are more efficient ways of building a loyal relationship between employer and employee, thus preventing pilots from bailing out.

Cheers,

Upspeed.

Last edited by upspeed; 25th Oct 2012 at 02:41.
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Old 25th Oct 2012, 14:20
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South, near the end of the world.
Age: 45
Posts: 261
The main problem about joining EVA or CAL as FO is that I don't see any upgrade chance specially if you are joining the B744 fleet.

At CAL, there haven't any expat upgrade to Captain in the 744 fleet for the last 5 years. Much better chances had the Airbus guys.

So, if I would have to be expat again I will not join any Far East company as an FO unless I don't have any other chance to feed my family.
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Old 25th Oct 2012, 14:52
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Over the Pacific mostly
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Air Japan, Peach, Air Asia Japan, JetStar (in all their bases around SE Asia) NCA, all offer upgrade programs, you are right in the sense that there aren't many places that offer comprehensive upgrade programs but there are a few, I am one who believes that there will be more companies, specially in China that will have no other option but to offer upgrade programs in the coming years.

Last edited by The Dominican; 25th Oct 2012 at 14:53.
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Old 26th Oct 2012, 05:48
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
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EVA has a large number of expat captains.
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Old 26th Oct 2012, 11:18
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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I don't know what you are meaning with large....back to 2010 there weren't more than 60 expat pilots (CA/FO) in EVA...and fewer then 40 at CAL...
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Old 29th Oct 2012, 02:57
  #50 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Promotion in Taiwan

Cosmet,

At this moment, CAL is planning to phase out its 744 just like many other airlines. So there are no upgrades on the fleet but guys are getting opportunities to upgrade on the 738. There are ups and downs about flying regional routes for expats but it's what gets you the four stripes at the moment. My point is CAL does offer promotion to expats if you are willing to stick around. In the past five years, there were an Aussie and a Brazilian who got their command on the 744. The Brazilian was 34 and had only been with CAL for 4 to 5 years the most when he got his upgrade.
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Old 30th Oct 2012, 08:34
  #51 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: the City by the Bay
Posts: 509
this may be of interest:

EVA Airways pilot interview information and gouge

pretty old info but seems they were asking 60k then too.

Last edited by armchairpilot94116; 30th Oct 2012 at 08:39.
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Old 30th Nov 2012, 13:46
  #52 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Israel
Age: 40
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Smile about EVA

Hi Upspeed
can i also get info about the SIM and the screening?
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Old 30th Nov 2012, 13:49
  #53 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Israel
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Thumbs up one more thing

I hope you did well on Oct with the SIM and the screening
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Old 8th Dec 2012, 06:31
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: the City by the Bay
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Ci signed for six 77W. More may come.

China Airlines to order six Boeing 777-300ERs
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Old 8th Dec 2012, 09:13
  #55 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Europe
Posts: 288
the reason for the high bond? Very simple...in the past I would say prior to 2007 or 6, there's was no bond(money paid to an airlines) but it was some expats that jumped the bond after receiving some type experience...therefore who to blame?
Have to disagree. Must be a valid reason when 90% of expats decide to leave in few years and the rest leave the same afternoon their bond expires.
Expats don't see CAL or EVA as the career airline and the blame is on the airline side.

Last edited by littlejet; 8th Dec 2012 at 09:25.
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Old 26th Jan 2013, 11:54
  #56 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
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Hi guys,

Simple question : I have all the requirements to apply to EVA but they ask for valid ATPL. Does it mean full ATPL or CPL + frozen ATPL is acceptable ?

And btw are they still recruiting ?

thanks
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Old 26th Jan 2013, 12:23
  #57 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 1998
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You need a full ATPL, as you will convert your Icao one to the a Taiwanese one. You will do a Air Law exam with the CAA there, and everyone passes.
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Old 26th Jan 2013, 16:29
  #58 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
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I thought i could fly there with my jar CPL + frozen ATPL as i do in Singapore . Here i did the air law and all exams as well and i got a converted licence ( it's mentioned " endorsements : issued on the strength of CPL n°.... etc ). So why is it possible in Singapore and not in Taiwan?

Last edited by tokamak69; 26th Jan 2013 at 16:31.
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Old 26th Jan 2013, 18:03
  #59 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 1998
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Thats just the Taiwan rules, i am not sure why!!If its a Eva requirement to have a Full ATPL or Taiwan CAA i am not sure. The Singapore system is probably similar to the system we have hear in Hong Kong.
How close are you to unfreezing the your ATPL? another route which might help is go and do an FAA ATP , you only need 1500 hours.
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Old 27th Jan 2013, 04:43
  #60 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
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I already have enough hours to unfreeze it but i've got a JAR licence and flying in Singapore with no JAR instructors / examinors. Then no way to get my full ATPL .
Or i have to pay for a sim session in Europe...
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