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-   -   Easyjet FO anxiety attack (https://www.pprune.org/rumours-news/625461-easyjet-fo-anxiety-attack.html)

Raph737 12th Sep 2019 23:26

Easyjet FO anxiety attack
 
Any thoughts? I wonder what was the underlying issues that caused this FO to "freak out"...

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknew...id=mailsignout

73qanda 13th Sep 2019 03:14

I’ll hazard a guess.......... a stress load that he or she was unable to manage.

Chazlington 13th Sep 2019 04:16

Cue the debate about whether Cadets flying Airbuses straight out of flight school is good/safe.

flyfan 13th Sep 2019 05:37

Could happen to everybody, and nobody was hurt. Help him to get his confidence back and that‘s it, no reason for a huge media story there. We‘re all human, people...there’s nothing to see, carry on.

cappt 13th Sep 2019 05:51

Should probably consider a different career.

Duchess_Driver 13th Sep 2019 06:09



Cue the debate about whether Cadets flying Airbuses straight out of flight school is good/safe

Hardly fresh out of nappies... probably about 450hrs post training. Like everything in life, coming out of integrated schools you get some excellent students, most average and some poor.

Slightly surprised that it was his first experience of a “late go-around”. Should have done plenty of them in school...

When did Easy retire their last 73?

AviatorDave 13th Sep 2019 06:20


Originally Posted by Chazlington (Post 10568728)
Cue the debate about whether Cadets flying Airbuses straight out of flight school is good/safe.

Why that? Most of them, especially at easyJet, due so quite successfully and safely.
What happened to this FO could also happen to a most experienced captain, depending on personal circumstances.

The more interesting part would be to see how this is dealt with (help vs. punishment), but I am somewhat confident that Easy will get this one right.

blind pew 13th Sep 2019 06:49

Could happen to anyone
 
Know of a captain who locked himself in the loo whilst the boys decided where they would divert to after FCO and surrounding airfields closed with fog. Only came out after he heard the gear come down.
Poor sod in this case obviously way out of comfort zone..maybe better training the answer or even three crew like the good old days

ukc_mike 13th Sep 2019 10:32


Originally Posted by AviatorDave (Post 10568778)
The more interesting part would be to see how this is dealt with (help vs. punishment), but I am somewhat confident that Easy will get this one right.

From the AAIB report::


Experiencing a panic attack does not necessarily preclude someone from holding an aviation medical but, once known, the condition must be declared and adequately controlled. After support from the operator, his AME and other medical professionals, the co-pilot was assessed as fit to return to flying.
I would post a link to the report (published yesterday), but I don't have enough posts.

CHfour 13th Sep 2019 10:53

@cappt
 

Originally Posted by cappt (Post 10568757)
Should probably consider a different career.

An understandable reaction but around 1 in 5 of the general population suffer from anxiety at some time in their life so must have developed coping strategies to prevent anxiety turning into panic. I've had a couple of passengers board my aircraft and then offload themselves as a result of anxiety. If only they could understand that anxiety feeds on itself as the sufferer erroneously believes that they are going to loose control of themselves which seldom happens.

Capt Fathom 13th Sep 2019 11:05

It may sound tough, but we don’t need pilots who are scared of flying!

jmmoric 13th Sep 2019 11:38


Originally Posted by Capt Fathom (Post 10569045)
It may sound tough, but we don’t need pilots who are scared of flying!

He could use training a few go arounds and learn that "firewalling the throttle" is okay, and better than the alternate. Other than that, I definately understand that he could become anxious if not used to turbulence and changing wind conditions during short finals, and low on time as well feeling a need to "show he is up for the task"... 600 vs. 14000 hours is, no matter how nice the guy in the other seat is, still a pressure.

So get him into a cockpit, and let him regain his confidence. If he cannot, that's another matter.

cattletruck 13th Sep 2019 11:49


So get him into a cockpit, and let him regain his confidence. If he cannot, that's another matter.
I've always been a believer in giving people a second chance, but in my own opinion this is not the time and place. He should have been weeded out earlier (or at least played cards then). Most non-LLC passengers wouldn't expect anything less, but I guess it's just simply another case of you get what you pay for.

sonicbum 13th Sep 2019 12:01


Originally Posted by jmmoric (Post 10569080)
Other than that, I definately understand that he could become anxious if not used to turbulence and changing wind conditions during short finals, and low on time as well feeling a need to "show he is up for the task"... 600 vs. 14000 hours is, no matter how nice the guy in the other seat is, still a pressure.

So get him into a cockpit, and let him regain his confidence. If he cannot, that's another matter.

While wishing our colleague a quick recovery and a bright career, I have to disagree with the above, as all those sensations should have been experienced during initial pilot training.
It is ok to put 250 hours guys on the RHS of an airliner IF there is enough "squeezing" during flight training to minimise any kind of unwanted outcome with paying customers onboard.
Anyway, our colleague might be reading us and here nobody is perfect, so again hope he will make it to retirement as a pilot but there are issues that need to be addressed -IMHO- with "modern" flight training.

Banana Joe 13th Sep 2019 12:21

I had an event during my very very early career (now I am in the early phase, so there you go), less than 100 hours on type, a sudden windshift during the flare that made me lose 15 knots of airspeed. A go around was made by myself but some damage had been done. No biggie, the aircraft flew just fine. Subsequent successful landing, on the same runway, done by myself. I came out clean with the higher ups and said what I might have done wrong during that phase. I was supposed to receive some extra training, but at no time was my job in jeopardy. Training quickly cancelled after the internal safety report confirmed my piloting technique, according to the book, was correct and we had an actual windshear with no warnings. I saved the day with the go around, indeed.

Ok, I do not suffer from anxiety and this event did not affect me. Everybody is different, but I would hope the lad gets a second chance, with the support required.

And I bet this lad had less than 100 hours on a real airplane before getting to fly an A320. He must be an MPL product.

jmmoric 13th Sep 2019 12:51


Originally Posted by sonicbum (Post 10569096)
While wishing our colleague a quick recovery and a bright career, I have to disagree with the above, as all those sensations should have been experienced during initial pilot training.
It is ok to put 250 hours guys on the RHS of an airliner IF there is enough "squeezing" during flight training to minimise any kind of unwanted outcome with paying customers onboard.
Anyway, our colleague might be reading us and here nobody is perfect, so again hope he will make it to retirement as a pilot but there are issues that need to be addressed -IMHO- with "modern" flight training.

A Piper or Cessna on a windy, gusty, turbulent day and cross wind landings will always help the confidence :)

But people can definately go through many hours before encountering something "new" or "interresting"... It's these new and interresting things that makes you learn.

Banana Joe 13th Sep 2019 12:54

If the person involved is confirmed to be a MPL graduate, I am curious to know the actual amount of hours he had on SEP before progressing his training in the simulator. And it would be also interesting to know what wind limits were imposed for his training on during the initial phase. I heard of schools that would not let you fly with wind reported more than 10 kts.

Simulators, as good as they might be, are not good at replicating variable wind conditions.

Meester proach 13th Sep 2019 13:02


Originally Posted by cattletruck (Post 10569085)
I've always been a believer in giving people a second chance, but in my own opinion this is not the time and place. He should have been weeded out earlier (or at least played cards then). Most non-LLC passengers wouldn't expect anything less, but I guess it's just simply another case of you get what you pay for.


jeez, it’s not about a second chance the guy/ gal had a psychological problem.
even with the best training 600 hrs will seem at times not a lot when you are dealing with the European weather.

And don’t start with the 250 hrs nonsense, BA have been doing it for years successfully .

the outcome is correct - AME is satisfied so they are back online .

lomapaseo 13th Sep 2019 13:09

Don't throw away the man

Help him manage. I believe more than a few of us have had panics attacks in life. Once addressed they are safer than the guy who never had one and great support for the next guy.

In the end I would prefer flying with a pilot who has had one and experienced coming out of it.

bulldog89 13th Sep 2019 13:25

What if the next time the CPT is incapacitated for any reason? Is his stress level going to be lower than this time? I don't think so. Will A flight attendant land the plane? Again. I don't think so.

This is not about the total amount of hours of anything like that. I think pretty much everyone had his "oh shit" moment, even during training, but we didn't freeze and we just kept flying the aircraft. As pilots there is a small number of things we're not allowed to do, and one of these is for sure freezing while doing our job.

I truly hope he fully recovered from his condition, otherwise I'd consider him as an additional threat to safety.


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