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a350 Abnormal skin problems

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a350 Abnormal skin problems

Old 24th Jun 2021, 19:06
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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I’m not surprised. The large amount of wing flex on the 787 needs a very flexible paint as well.
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Old 24th Jun 2021, 21:28
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Indeed. It can be pulled off the wing by large suction cups that are used for fall-arrest protection. Do not attempt to Spider-Man your way up a 787.

https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/avia.../SAFO20006.pdf
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Old 20th Feb 2022, 11:04
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Chris2303 View Post
If I was Airbus I'd say "fine - all your orders are cancelled, here's your deposits, do not call us again"
Prescient...

Airbus cancels Qatar A321 order
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Old 20th Feb 2022, 11:34
  #24 (permalink)  
fdr
 
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Originally Posted by widgeon View Post
I was at canadair in the early 80"s as i recall the mesh and a layer of film adhesive were the first items layed in the moulds before the first layer of pre preg. . Part of the inspection was to verify conductivity between to points after cure, it was often a problem to achieve the correct figures. I would think replacement of any of the mesh would be nearly impossible while keeping conductivity with the rest of the mesh .
Sounds like a future business proposition to fix up CFRP surfaces to bring back conductivity requirements. I would imagine that is a conducting surface film to be applied to the prepped surface and bonded to the static dischargers... Giving more life to the Typhoon wouldn't hurt either...
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Old 21st Feb 2022, 02:25
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ZeBedie View Post
Is this anything new, or are 30+ year old A320 carbon structures layered in the same way?
Not likely. Most of the carbon structures on older aircraft are not primary structure that's subject to strict lightning protection requirements. The issue is not so much lightning damage to the structure itself (although a lightning attachment can cause localized damage to composite structure), it's the induced voltages that are transmitted to the wiring below. Those induced voltages can damage the interfacing electronics if they get too high. The requirements for induced lightning voltages to the avionics is already higher on primary composite construction (e.g. 787, A380) then they are for conventional aluminum construction. So if the lightning protection on composite structure is degraded, it can affect the avionics.
EASA/FAA cover all this in the continued airworthness requirements, including sampling programs where they go out and measure electrical bonding and resistances on in-service aircraft.
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Old 22nd Feb 2022, 13:56
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
Not likely. Most of the carbon structures on older aircraft are not primary structure that's subject to strict lightning protection requirements. The issue is not so much lightning damage to the structure itself (although a lightning attachment can cause localized damage to composite structure), it's the induced voltages that are transmitted to the wiring below. Those induced voltages can damage the interfacing electronics if they get too high. The requirements for induced lightning voltages to the avionics is already higher on primary composite construction (e.g. 787, A380) then they are for conventional aluminum construction. So if the lightning protection on composite structure is degraded, it can affect the avionics.
EASA/FAA cover all this in the continued airworthness requirements, including sampling programs where they go out and measure electrical bonding and resistances on in-service aircraft.
There is also an arc gap issue within the tanks.
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Old 2nd Mar 2022, 07:56
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Oh oh. Emirates demanding the problem be "cracked" prior to any A350 deliveries:

https://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/n...quality-issues
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Old 4th Mar 2022, 15:37
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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And now IAG reporting issues:

https://www.reuters.com/business/aer...ts-2022-03-02/

Is it time to admit Qatar was right?
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Old 5th Mar 2022, 04:54
  #29 (permalink)  

Only half a speed-brake
 
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Being the single largest shareholder with 25% of the whole IAG, it's their composite after all.
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