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Airbus MAVERIC, blended wing body aircraft demonstrator

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Airbus MAVERIC, blended wing body aircraft demonstrator

Old 11th Feb 2020, 07:32
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Airbus MAVERIC, blended wing body aircraft demonstrator

Airbus has revealed MAVERIC (Model Aircraft for Validation and Experimentation of Robust Innovative Controls) its “blended wing body” scale model technological demonstrator.

Below Video from Airbus:



Airbus article:

https://www.airbus.com/newsroom/stor...-aircraft.html
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 12:49
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Well, from my passenger point of view, it seem to have either no window seats at all, or a very reduced proportion of window seats.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 13:26
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Chances are, by the time something like this goes into production, windows will be 'virtual' anyway.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 13:30
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Why need a window, can't see anything at night or in cloud, and some airlines demand you pull the blinds at night. A good video would provide all you need on your IFE. Spent many an hour as pax without a window, C-97, C-121, C-130, Caribou. Folks are too busy watching the movie to be bothered whats out the window. Remember flying LAX to NY daytime and was ordered to close the blind so they could show some B grade Hollywood tripe movie, and the Grand Canyon was on display below on a beautiful clear blue sky day. Having traveled half way round the world what do you think my viewing preference was? The consensus was the movie.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 13:33
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Wild Guess:
That aircraft is as likely to be unmanned as not.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 15:30
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I'm mildly claustrophobic, and a window seat helps to ease the remains of my mind (I'm 75). I don't NEED a window seat, but I really enjoy the view when it's available. I think most pilots prefer a window seat, but maybe that's just me.

Cheers,
Grog
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 15:57
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Originally Posted by capngrog View Post
I think most pilots prefer a window seat, but maybe that's just me.
Second that. I got to be able to see out. Why else put so much effort into getting to row 0?
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 16:18
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Wouldn’t want to be sitting or standing far off the centreline if it starts rolling, either in turbulence or a turn......
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 16:35
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Wouldn’t want to be sitting or standing far off the centreline if it starts rolling, either in turbulence or a turn......
not a problem , by the time this aircraft will be carrying passengers they would have invented an anti-G system ..
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 16:53
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Every row should have a view, including the single pilot. The 'windows' will use LCD screens replicating, or bettering conventional views, sourced by appropriate cameras.

Elimination of the windows provides significant structural and weight benefit, particularly for the flight deck by not having to contour the structure to give a clear view, or 'beef-up' the curves for pressurisation.
Many manufacturers future programmes evaluated the these changes in the late 1990s; the stopper was the availability or reliability of the vision electronics. Nowadays the technology exists, both for vision and single pilot operation.

As for roll issues, the roll control should not generate any uncomfortable movement more than could be experienced in light turbulence today. An advantage of adaptive control is the ability to schedule roll acceleration, and that the vertical motion due to roll does not reverse suddenly - sensed 'g', as with turbulence.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 16:56
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Windows (or lack thereof) is not the challenge with this type of aircraft, it's providing emergency exits in the central part of the cabin. Will be interesting to see what they propose in this respect.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 17:33
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No Window, no Pilot

The discussions about the reason(s) for having a pilot(s) come down to having someone up front who can, as some of our contributors like to shout, FLY the PLANE - and this with the most basic tools, having deselected or lost anything automatic.
Well, since the days of the open cockpit, the most basic tool available to the pilot has been his windscreen. Statisticians will now come and calculate how likely an electrical failure causing artificial screen failure will be.
Concorde was initially conceived with a blind cockpit in cruise (droop nose raised) due to the perceived difficulty in making and financing a transparency which would take the thermal and dynamic loading.
Even Davies thought blind flight could work in the high speed, high level environment. Philosophers and pilots amongst the community got their supersonic/ chicken-proof glass window, however - not least for safety considerations.
As for passenger windows - while it is truly annoying that many punters prefer the movie to the view - I’m guessing that the pilotless aircraft will be a passenger less aircraft anyway.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 18:19
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Wonder about the emergency exits for this configuration.. If one side is out, the 90 second specification may be challenging.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 20:52
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Originally Posted by Lonewolf_50 View Post
Wild Guess:
That aircraft is as likely to be unmanned as not.
Yes, this is a small scale control demonstrator produced by a french team. Interestingly, within Airbus there's been a German test UAS, a British test UAS (Albatross) and now this French UAS. Maveric looks really good.

Roll motion at the outside seats won't be an issue in the scenario Maveric is looking at.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 02:37
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I think the roll issue is exaggerated,
What's maximum AOB that most airline SOPs allow - 30 degrees?
How far out from the centreline is the farthest seat?
Are they going to be cranking the thing `round the sky like a fast jet - not likely.
More likely than not - these aircraft will be flying benign routings and joining on long finals.
I wonder how much more efficient they could make it by getting rid of the tails and integrating the engines into the airframe?
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 03:22
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They seem great until it comes time to pressurize them.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 06:00
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Or to evacuate from them.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 09:21
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Nowadays the technology exists, both for vision and single pilot operation.
I do love this old chestnut.
Trains must be the easiest form of transport to automate but what percentage of the worlds trains are driverless?
Cargo ships must come a close second on the high seas, they are brought into port by a pilot crew anyway.
So back to aircraft, if a pilot is required then one assumes we need a spare as a back up, seems reasonable.
We will lose some cabin crew before we lose one of the pilots, no doubt about that.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 09:45
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Aren't engines integrated into the structure a maintenance nightmare, hence hanging them under the wings?
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 10:59
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Originally Posted by Interested Passenger View Post
Aren't engines integrated into the structure a maintenance nightmare, hence hanging them under the wings?
The maveric design isn't optimal for all user groups and there are good reasons for that. There's much more conversation on the intranet, which I don't see in the public domain so I can't comment on.

Suffice it to say, it all depends. Depending on the size of aircraft you're looking at, it could be perfectly fine to put the engines at the back (but the vstabs do need to move...).
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