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Cargo Jet makes a 360 at 100’

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Cargo Jet makes a 360 at 100’

Old 11th Dec 2019, 12:18
  #201 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by slowjet View Post
Back to thread, I guess as an old school real pilot as opposed to the current world of the magenta line button pushers, the guy in discussion.........................
‘Twas a Lady driver!
Captain Brenda Reipsaamie Wessink I think see post 188.
David
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 19:01
  #202 (permalink)  
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowjet
Back to thread, I guess as an old school real pilot as opposed to the current world of the magenta line button pushers, the guy in discussion.........................


‘Twas a Lady driver!
Captain Brenda Reipsaamie Wessink I think see post 188.
David

Looks like a grey haired South African bloke to me.
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 20:44
  #203 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by charlies angel View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowjet
Back to thread, I guess as an old school real pilot as opposed to the current world of the magenta line button pushers, the guy in discussion.........................


‘Twas a Lady driver!
Captain Brenda Reipsaamie Wessink I think see post 188.
David

Looks like a grey haired South African bloke to me.
That's because this thread can be added to the list of things that have drifted from the centerline....
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 20:59
  #204 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by rjtjrt View Post
The captain seems to have lived a very interesting life. Long experience in 727.
Some years ago he spent nearly 18/12 in a Zimbabwe prison after a 727 flight to Equatorial Guinea was interrupted.
The coup attempt? That was a mess. They were stitched up if memory serves.
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 21:04
  #205 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by LookingForAJob View Post
I'm not a professional pilot BUT....how is that possible? I mean, no PAPIs or aiming point makings!
Not required for a visual approach.
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 21:25
  #206 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by JamesT73J View Post
The coup attempt? That was a mess. They were stitched up if memory serves.
Well, I guess that depends upon which "they" we're talking about.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_E...%A9tat_attempt
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 21:41
  #207 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting video into the coup attempt, if you do some research on Simon Mann!

They all knew what they were up to and all took the time for it
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 00:39
  #208 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by 601 View Post


Did you have to learn the fine skill of DME Homing in SA?
Mention that to most pilots and they'll tell you it can't be done.

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Old 12th Dec 2019, 05:15
  #209 (permalink)  
 
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I can’t think of anywhere else in the world besides Australia, where a DME was installed without being paired with some sort of beacon. DME homing died off IIRC in the late 1990s.

Now a lost black art unless anyone still has a copy of the procedure with the heading and timings.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 05:22
  #210 (permalink)  
601
 
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Now a lost black art unless anyone still has a copy of the procedure with the heading and timings.
Or burned into our fading memory.
Throwing in limited panel and one engine out made for some interesting IR renewals.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 07:13
  #211 (permalink)  
 
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And waiting for the one hydraulic pump to raise the gear during go-around on DC3........

601 are you ex Rhodesia?
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 17:26
  #212 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by rjtjrt View Post
The captain seems to have lived a very interesting life. Long experience in 727.
Some years ago he spent nearly 18/12 in a Zimbabwe prison after a 727 flight to Equatorial Guinea was interrupted.
Are we sure that this is the same poor sod that got called up to replace another pilot on that flight? The history of that particular aircraft still makes interesting reading.

For doing circling at low level, the 72 is one of the nicer Boeings to fly. The Mog isn't LAX, and these guys were flying easily within their capabilities.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 17:44
  #213 (permalink)  
 
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Are we sure that this is the same poor sod that got called up to replace another pilot on that flight? The history of that particular aircraft still makes interesting reading.
He was flying for, and employed by, Executive Outcomes, who flew around Africa as mercenaries with 2 x 727's. Think we can all say with some certainty he knew what he was upto!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Outcomes
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 20:21
  #214 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Capi_Cafre' View Post
Does the 75 lack the rudder authority to align with the runway at its crosswind limit? That looked like a lot of side load on the main gear at touchdown.
No crab angle limit on the 737 on a wet runway.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 20:24
  #215 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
I can’t think of anywhere else in the world besides Australia, where a DME was installed without being paired with some sort of beacon. DME homing died off IIRC in the late 1990s.

Now a lost black art unless anyone still has a copy of the procedure with the heading and timings.

See Appendix A here for DME Homing procedure:
www dot airwaysmuseum dot com/DME%20Ops%20Notes dot htm
(system won't let me post the URL directly)

Last edited by FalconFan; 12th Dec 2019 at 20:34.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 20:38
  #216 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by FalconFan View Post
See Appendix A here for DME Homing procedure:
www dot airwaysmuseum dot com/DME%20Ops%20Notes dot htm
(system won't let me post the URL directly)
Direct link for you: Operational Notes on Distance Measuring Equipment

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Old 12th Dec 2019, 22:34
  #217 (permalink)  
 
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Amazing old school handling skills. Of course, if he'd spanked it in then I'm sure the same videos would then be used to illustrate how reckless the pilot was and how it was only a matter of time...
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 22:51
  #218 (permalink)  
 
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Some cultures seem to thrive on procedural complexity.

From the link posted above:

HOMING PROCEDURE

"30 Degree and Rate of Closure Method"

1 - Select and identify the D.M.E. beacon.
2 - Fly a constant course and note whether the distance indication remains CONSTANT, is INCREASING or is DECREASING.
3 - If the distance indication is CONSTANT then the relative bearing of the station is 90 degrees to the left or right of the aircraft.
4 - If the distance indication is INCREASING then turn 180 degrees to a new heading which will then give a DECREASE in distance indication.
5 - When a heading which gives a DECREASE in distance, note the RATE OF CLOSURE - (e.g., 5 miles in 2 mins. 10 secs.) - see Notes.
6 - Turn 30 degrees LEFT and again note the RATE OF CLOSURE.
Then either:
7 - If the RATE OF CLOSURE has INCREASED then turn another 30 degrees LEFT and note the new RATE OF CLOSURE. Now bracket the course which gives the highest RATE OF CLOSURE in order to find the course on which MAXIMUM RATE OF CLOSURE CAN BE OBTAINED.
or
8 - If the RATE OF CLOSURE has decreased (after Step 6) then turn 60 degrees RIGHT and note the new RATE OF CLOSURE. Now bracket the new course in order to find the course on which MAXIMUM RATE OF CLOSURE can be obtained.
9 - Having determined the course on which to fly, make frequent checks of the RATE OF CLOSURE. If the RATE OF CLOSURE remains CONSTANT maintain the heading until over the beacon - if the RATE OF CLOSURE decreases then make small alterations, e.g., 10 to 15 degrees to the heading in an endeavour to bracket the heading on which a constant RATE OF CLOSURE can be obtained.
10 - If the track made good is not in fact the direct track to the beacon then, when abeam the beacon, i.e., when the distance indication ceases to decrease and then increases, turn 90 degrees to proceed to the beacon - if the turn is not in the correct sense then continue the turn another 180 degrees in the same direction as the original turn.

NOTES
(i) If on any course the rate of closure is such to indicate a closing speed approximately the same as the T.A.S. and provided that as the aircraft proceeds further the rate of closure remains relatively constant, it is advisable to hold the course being flown until either over the top or abeam the D.M.E. beacon.
(ii) If on any course the rate of closure is obviously very slow then do not wait to measure a fixed change in distance but turn 30 degrees left and proceed in accordance with Step 6.
(iii) When the rate of closure is being determined it is desirable to measure a precise distance between two calibration marks on the D.M.E. indicator and measure the time in minutes and seconds, and then compare the times taken for similar distances. If, however, the distance indication appears constant then the course should be held for, say, one minute and note made of the distance covered. When using the X10 scale it should be remembered that if the indicator is watched only for a matter of seconds a rate of closure of one mile per minute will not result in an obvious pointer movement. Pilots should guard against assuming a constant distance indication without observing the indicator for at least one minute.
(iv) During homing procedures, when within 10 miles of the D.M.E. beacon, it is suggested that the course being flown should be continued until either over the top or abeam the D.M.E. beacon. This will assist in orientation prior to commencing descent.
(v) When on a course that originally gave a reasonable rate of closure it is observed that the rate of closure is decreasing, then "bracketing" may be employed to find a more satisfactory course. When bracketing, if a turn of 15 degrees is made and it is in the wrong direction then a turn of at least 30 degrees in the opposite direction should be made. Turns of less than 10 degrees will not result in an obvious change of rate of closure.
(vi) It has been proved theoretically that in drift conditions it is possible to obtain the maximum rate of closure when flying on a course other then the course which gives a direct track towards the D.M.E. beacon. However, this very slight increase in rate of closure is not pronounced and as the aircraft proceeds further towards the beacon the rate of closure will decrease, whereas if the aeroplane is tracking towards the beacon the rate of closure will remain constant.
(vii) It will be found in practice that after the initial 30 degree turn, the problem of orientation becomes simply a matter of turning the aeroplane to a heading which gives a reasonable rate of closure and then bracketing, initially with turns of 15 degrees, to obtain the course which gives maximum rate of closure.
(viii) It is desirable, to assist in orientation, that all turns should be made to the LEFT unless it is apparent that such a turn is in the wrong sense. This procedure will prevent confusion when trying to remember the last direction turned.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 22:57
  #219 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Airbubba View Post
Some cultures seem to thrive on procedural complexity.

From the link posted above:

The cornfields Ted, the cornfields!
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Old 13th Dec 2019, 08:03
  #220 (permalink)  
 
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When we, I’m guessing 601 will confirm a “no “

Last edited by megle2; 13th Dec 2019 at 09:59.
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