Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Rumours & News
Reload this Page >

AirCanada Diversion into HNL

Rumours & News Reporting Points that may affect our jobs or lives as professional pilots. Also, items that may be of interest to professional pilots.

AirCanada Diversion into HNL

Old 11th Jul 2019, 18:19
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Canada
Posts: 301
AirCanada Diversion into HNL

Air Canada spokesperson Peter Fitzpatrick said the plane was about two hours past Hawaii when it hit "severe clear air" turbulence
CTV Montreal Staff
Published Thursday, July 11, 2019 12:56PM EDT
Last Updated Thursday, July 11, 2019 1:43PM EDT An Air Canada flight from Toronto to Sydney, Australia, with a stop in Vancouver, made an emergency landing in Honolulu on Thursday.Air Canada Flight 33 was two hours west of Hawaii when it encountered unexpected severe turbulence over the Pacific Ocean.The plane then turned and requested an emergency landing in Honolulu, touching down at 6:45 a.m. Hawaiian Time (12:45 EDT).A source familiar with the situation tells CTV News that 20 to 25 passengers and one crew member were injured as a result.Many of the people hurt have head and neck injuries.In a statement Air Canada said that the injuries were considered minor and that medical personnel were examining the passengers."We are currently making arrangements for the passengers including hotel accommodations and meals in Honolulu, as well as options for resumption of the flight," said a spokesperson.The plane was a Boeing 777 with 269 passengers and 15 crew members.
Longtimer is offline  
Old 11th Jul 2019, 18:30
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Milano (Italy)
Posts: 8
That's why i never undo my seatbelt until the plane stops at the gate, i really don't understand why as soon as the seatbelt sign is turned off almost everyone removes them very quickly, as if the seatbelts were extremely uncomfortable. Maybe they don't know how many people every year get hurt in this type of events.
Grav is offline  
Old 11th Jul 2019, 19:20
  #3 (permalink)  
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 58
Posts: 4,102
That's why i never undo my seatbelt until the plane stops at the gate
Me too! A few flights ago, the fellow seated next to me opened his seatbelt the moment the light went off. I asked him to put the belt back on. He seemed perplexed at my request. I explained that I don't want him hitting me if we encounter turbulence. He seemed annoyed, but complied with my request.
Pilot DAR is online now  
Old 11th Jul 2019, 22:06
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Where databases don't crash
Age: 42
Posts: 25
People do not understand what CAT can do to an, otherwise, level flight, but the airlines do not want to show them, either, in fear of scaring the bejesus out of them.
WingSlinger is offline  
Old 11th Jul 2019, 23:49
  #5 (permalink)  
Everything is under control.
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 432
Update from Honolulu TV station, with a few photos:

"Of the 37 passengers with injuries, 21 had minor injuries and nine had serious injuries."

https://www.khon2.com/news/local-new...re-turbulence/
Eboy is offline  
Old 11th Jul 2019, 23:58
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 67
Posts: 479
Interesting that, from photo available, of 12 masks that dropped in one section, only one was used.
That the masks dropping was unrelated to cabin pressure is not really the point.
The passengers did not know that when the masks appeared out of the roof.
Did they wait to see if they needed them before making the decision? Should they?
WingNut60 is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 00:12
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,044
Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
Interesting that, from photo available, of 12 masks that dropped in one section, only one was used.
That the masks dropping was unrelated to cabin pressure is not really the point.
The passengers did not know that when the masks appeared out of the roof.
Did they wait to see if they needed them before making the decision? Should they?
Do you mean, wait to see if they are told to use them? or wait to see if they passed out first ?
lomapaseo is online now  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 00:20
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Milano (Italy)
Posts: 8
At FL360 the answer to the question if they actually needed the mask should be clear in a very short time.

to be serious, i think that considering the fact that only a limited number of oxygen mask door opened, the fact that the doors were clearly opened by people's head after a sudden "drop" of the aircraft, and the likely immediate intervention of the cabin crew members to assist the passenger ruled out quickly the hypotesis that a rapid cabin decompression had occoured. But i think that i would probably had tried to use mine,
Grav is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 00:36
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Bangkok
Age: 44
Posts: 23
In fairness, there is almost never one bit of explanation of *why* people are asked to do these things. I fly in the developing world a lot and no one from places like China has decades of education about the dangers of anything, not that the seat belt part is that much better anywhere else. Cabin crew don't set the agenda for what's discussed in the safety briefing, I know, it's just that the bureaucracy has forgotten the human factor. Mentioning why people need to buckle up would go a long way to helping enforcement. I end up having to explain to people to buckle their kid up because I don't want him breaking my neck, or his, if he flies out of his seat - and often they're actually pretty thankful that someone explained it.

There is zero, zero education about this stuff for the general public who don't actively seek out information or watch air crash / air disaster content, basically, so they just think it's like the train or the bus or a taxi.

"This one has a z-axis in all situations. Fasten the Goddamn belt!"
Bangkokian is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 01:02
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 67
Posts: 479
Are you sure about the masks dropping after being struck by peoples heads?
I'm pretty sure that they can sometimes just be dislodged and drop from violent movement of the aircraft.

I think that I'd have had mine on in a flash, needed or not.
If they had actually needed the masks, at FL360, then it may NEVER have become clear to them, if they waited.
WingNut60 is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 06:28
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Dorset
Age: 66
Posts: 18
Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
Are you sure about the masks dropping after being struck by peoples heads?
I'm pretty sure that they can sometimes just be dislodged and drop from violent movement of the aircraft.
I remember a very hard landing at Philadelphia that resulted in about 50 masks dropping down.
timgill is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 06:44
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 352
It doesn't take much to make the masks fall down. I saw it happen on a Lauda B777 when the tug suddenly failed during pushback at Vienna. Another tug had to be called in to complete the task.
On Track is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 10:29
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 38
Air Canada spokesperson Peter Fitzpatrick said the plane was about two hours past Hawaii when it hit "severe clear air" turbulence
I'm calling bullshit on the "clear air" turbulence.
Kooka is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 10:45
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Oztrailia
Posts: 2,674
Kooka......why do you say that?
ACMS is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 11:03
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 38
Because it is much, much more likely they went through the top of a buildup. You should look at all these “clear air” turbulence incidents with a great deal of cynicism. Night time, they’re always at night. In the tropics. Nowhere near a jet stream.
Kooka is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 11:22
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Banksville
Posts: 27
I always keep my belt on, no matter length or type of flight. A bit looser once at cruise, very snug on take off/landing.
Once prior to TO in Pittsburgh, in strong winds, the Captain came over the intercom and explained snug-seatbelt wisdom: “we’d like to keep you off the ceiling.”
That always stuck with me!
Joejosh999 is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 11:30
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: sierra village
Posts: 131
Originally Posted by Kooka View Post
Because it is much, much more likely they went through the top of a buildup. You should look at all these “clear air” turbulence incidents with a great deal of cynicism. Night time, they’re always at night. In the tropics. Nowhere near a jet stream.
I suspect you may be right.
lucille is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 12:18
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: US
Posts: 1,961
Originally Posted by Kooka View Post
Because it is much, much more likely they went through the top of a buildup. You should look at all these “clear air” turbulence incidents with a great deal of cynicism. Night time, they’re always at night. In the tropics. Nowhere near a jet stream.
Daytime IMC is also when the 'fly into a buildup' occurs. About 15 yrs ago our Chief Pilot wrote "if it's night time, or daytime and you can't see the horizon, put the radar on. We've had 5 airplanes fly into the top of buildups in the last quarter."

Weather app showed no forecast turbulence for the area. It's not foolproof but it's pretty darn accurate. But it did show a small cluster of cells/buildups in the vicinity of where the event occurred.

The next question - what radar settings were being used? The calibrated settings won't show weather that you'd avoid if you could see it with your naked eye.
misd-agin is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 12:18
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: WAW
Age: 44
Posts: 19
Originally Posted by Pilot DAR View Post
Me too! A few flights ago, the fellow seated next to me opened his seatbelt the moment the light went off. I asked him to put the belt back on. He seemed perplexed at my request. I explained that I don't want him hitting me if we encounter turbulence. He seemed annoyed, but complied with my request.
Hmmm, while I am one of those keeping my seat belts on, I would not criticize anyone unbuckling rith after 'Fasten seat belts' light is off.
After all - this is clear and obvious message that we do not have to keep our seat belts - correct?
.

&
Sholayo is online now  
Old 12th Jul 2019, 12:55
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Manchester
Age: 41
Posts: 555
Originally Posted by Sholayo View Post
Hmmm, while I am one of those keeping my seat belts on, I would not criticize anyone unbuckling rith after 'Fasten seat belts' light is off.
After all - this is clear and obvious message that we do not have to keep our seat belts - correct?
.

&
You don't "have to" look both ways before crossing the road. I'd suggest it is a good idea though.
Ex Cargo Clown is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.