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Vegas-bound stag party who abused crew and exposed themselves on plane, jailed

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Vegas-bound stag party who abused crew and exposed themselves on plane, jailed

Old 7th Jun 2019, 23:52
  #41 (permalink)  
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It's my impression that booze hits you a lot harder at higher elevations (lower air pressure,) possibly due to dehydration.

If true, it implies that passengers drinking "within (large) limits" could be truly plastered when the plane reaches cruising altitude.

Doesn't excuse outrageous behavior...
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Old 8th Jun 2019, 01:08
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You Brit's just need to learn that you go crazy after you get to Las Vegas - after all, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas

On a more serious note, if your behavior results in an aircraft diversion, it should be a mandatory six figure fine, plus actual damages, and a lifetime ban from flying.

BTW, bragging about making 40k a year? Seriously?
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Old 8th Jun 2019, 03:13
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by capngrog
I'm just a bit curious here, but does anyone know what type of aircraft was involved in this incident? The great circle distance from Manchester, U.K. to Las Vegas, U.S.A., is roughly 5100 statute miles, and the distance from Manchester, U.K. to Winnipeg, Canada is roughly 3800 miles, or around 3/4 of the way from Manchester to Las Vegas. I would think that a transport category aircraft, having completed 75% of its journey would have burned off more than enough fuel so as to be under its maximum landing weight, thus making it unnecessary to dump fuel for landing. Or could the reportage be incorrect? Or could my guesstimate figuring be incorrect (more likely)?

Cheers,
Grog
A330 is used on this route
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 00:24
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A night, or two, in Winterpeg's drunk tank is no picnic. They are lucky the didn’t reach LAS, or they might be spending a few years, guests of Uncle Sam, another "no picnic" venue.
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 10:57
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Are these international stag trips a peculiarly British thing?
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 11:04
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So? for the less technically knowledgable, please explain why any aircraft that diverts 3/4 of the way to its destination needs to dump 50 tonnes(!) of fuel. Surely it's not tankering MAN/LAS/MAN?
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 11:35
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In this case it was obvious why to divert because the drunkards were not under control. But what always make me wonder is those cases where they say that the unruly passenger have been restrained and fastened to his seat. I understand it like he then is no longer any risk to safety of the aircraft. Then why do divert to another airport and make the rest of the passengers suffer. Or is it some theory I have missed somewhere that say we still need to divert even if there is no longer any risk to safety?

Normally I believe its up to the PIC (Captain) to decide, but I wonder with all those cases where drunk passenger have been restrained and secured why divert and make all the other passengers suffer if there is nothing that would make continuing unsafe.
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 15:20
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A restrained (handcuffed), and drunk, passenger becomes in danger, himself, in case of another emergency where evacuation is needed. That’s why a diversion to the nearest, suitable, airport is needed.
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 17:01
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I wouldn't have thought that there is much to stop the carrier suing the lot of them for costs recovery in a civil court, regardless of the criminal conviction and sentence. No doubt the £40K/year builder will have some of that stashed away for the bailiffs to find, and I bet he has a nice house...that should do it. But then I'm not a lawyer.
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 20:12
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Originally Posted by old,not bold
I wouldn't have thought that there is much to stop the carrier suing the lot of them for costs recovery in a civil court, regardless of the criminal conviction and sentence. No doubt the £40K/year builder will have some of that stashed away for the bailiffs to find, and I bet he has a nice house...that should do it. But then I'm not a lawyer.
A mate of mine has just flown AGP-MAN In the small print of his ticket and booking conditions it states similar to Ď any disruptive or criminal behaviour will render you liable for all costs, not limited to but including compensation due to other passengers costs to aircraft operator and all airport and related costsí
I would hope most if not all airlines have a similar clause.
That should curtail the honeymoon arrangements somewhat
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Old 9th Jun 2019, 21:28
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How many times did I make my way airside to the aircraft at 5, 6 or 7 in the morning to be confronted with passengers in bars getting tanked up before their flights ?

How many times did handling agents try and get drunken pax onto the aircraft thus moving their problem on ?

How many times were my crew verbally and occasionally physically intimidated by inebriated customers both male and female ?

How many times did I call for the Police to remove such idiots from the aeroplane either before departure or after arrival ?

The answer to all the above is many, many times.

It is a problem throughout an industry which encourages the sale of alcohol before and during flight.
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 02:02
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Originally Posted by WingSlinger
A restrained (handcuffed), and drunk, passenger becomes in danger, himself, in case of another emergency where evacuation is needed. Thatís why a diversion to the nearest, suitable, airport is needed.
No more so than many other legitimate "differently abled" passengers, I'd have thought.
Not to mention those with support animals.
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 02:11
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by old,not bold
I wouldn't have thought that there is much to stop the carrier suing the lot of them for costs recovery in a civil court, regardless of the criminal conviction and sentence. No doubt the £40K/year builder will have some of that stashed away for the bailiffs to find, and I bet he has a nice house...that should do it. But then I'm not a lawyer.
The airline might then need to show that there is no contingency built in to their ticket pricing just for such diversions.

As I understand it, they would need to demonstrate not just a cost, but an actual loss.
They might also need to show consistency. That is, that they always seek recovery of said costs.
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 02:17
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Originally Posted by pants on fire...
Just dropping them off in Winnipeg would be punishment enough for most people, even to the point of being considered cruel and unusual punishment.

The sentences are entirely appropriate. Compensation would also be entirely appropriate.
Why wouldn't they drop them off at YWG? They would have been drunk on an aircraft on Canadian soil, therefore indictable, and it would obviously be a risk to take them back to the UK.
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 13:34
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Thatís Manchester

We smell the breath of each crew member (US too) and come down hard (quite rightly...) but we will load you up with drunken disorderly pax innit?
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 14:25
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Am I the only one to sense a business opportunity here?

https://vintagetech.blognook.com/201...s-private-jet/
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 21:22
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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marconiphone,

​​​​​​"Sounds like the sort of drink-fuelled anti-social behaviour that bedevils public spaces throughout the UK."

What a load of clap trap! That is NOT the UK I recognise. I split my time between London and New York and you are just as likely to see this sort of thing in New York as you are in the UK, which is pretty rarely in either place.

Lay off the cliches eh?
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Old 11th Jun 2019, 10:04
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Its not claptrap at all...have you been round any northern (or southern) UK city on a Saturday night at 0200?...the drunken disorder defies belief...nowhere in the US or Europe to beat it (except perhaps the Brits in Spain or on hen/stag nights in Europe)...and I ve travelled, man. The Brits have lost all sense of boundary or propriety.
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Old 11th Jun 2019, 12:52
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I've just returned from an inclusive resort in the Caribbean, and I can assure you that drunken Americans are every bit as big a problem as drunken Brits.......
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Old 11th Jun 2019, 13:42
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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One UK airline was getting so fed up with early morning drunks on its flights from a UK regional airport that they hit on an innovative solution. They asked the airport how much profit the bar made at that time of day, then paid them slightly more to close the bar!

Denying boarding to drunks who have checked luggage in the hold will mean delay and disruption for everyone else, including those on later flights for which the aircraft has been scheduled. Not to mention the risk of injury to the gate staff. So it's not surprising that some airlines accept passengers who have had too much to drink before boarding.

If passengers refuse to obey the lawful instructions of cabin staff in flight, then the flight should divert and the passengers should be off-loaded into the hands of the local police - and the whole cost later recovered from the miscreants.
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