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Airlander retired

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Airlander retired

Old 13th Jan 2019, 09:17
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Airlander retired

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...herts-46810151


World's longest aircraft retired

The world's longest aircraft has been retired from service as developers prepare to start work on a new model. The 32m Airlander 10 - a combination of plane and airship - had completed six test flights before it collapsed to the ground in November 2017. Hybrid Air Vehicles (HAV), based in Bedford, said it had received Civil Aviation Authority backing to start work on a new craft.

It is hoped the new model will take to the skies in the early 2020s. Stephen McGlennan, chief executive officer of HAV, said: "Our focus is now entirely on bringing the first batch of production standard, type certified Airlander 10 aircraft into service with customers. The prototype served its purpose as the world's first full-sized hybrid aircraft, providing us with the data we needed to move forward from prototype to production standard. As a result, we do not plan to fly the prototype aircraft again."

HAV submitted a 32m insurance claim after Airlander 10 collapsed, which it told shareholders was the "maximum insured value".

The company said it had already had the design of the next airship approved by the European Aviation Safety Agency. It said this now puts them in a "strong position to launch production".

The company carried out its first test flight of Airlander 10 from its former home at Cardington Airfield in August 2016 but left the site in June last year.

In July, HAV revealed that it is to offer "luxury expeditions" when the airship tests were completed.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 10:04
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I wonder if we ever get so see another manned large lighter than air vehicle? Except for the Zeppelin NT none seems to be working.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 10:16
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You would have thought a news organisation like the BBC could have used a more descriptive and technically accurate phrase than "Collapsed to the ground." It makes it sound like a piece of scaffolding and does not educate anyone unfamiliar with the accident as to whether the causes were it got tangled up in a wire, strong winds, pilot error, design fault etc.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 11:02
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Well - it is LOCAL NEWS - and very few journalists of any sort have a technical education - in fact few of them can add up beyond 10 ...... plus it's not aimed at people who are interested in aircraft - it's the Public who they wantto read it

I wonder if they'll continue or just trouser the insurance cash - that's probably the wisest thing to do TBH
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 12:22
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c52
 
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Having read in the press the other day that 1800 miles is 1609 km - well, it just underlines my disinclination to trust what I read, and it's a great pity.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 12:47
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Originally Posted by c52 View Post
Having read in the press the other day that 1800 miles is 1609 km - well, it just underlines my disinclination to trust what I read, and it's a great pity.
1800 miles being 1609km is the result of a single keystroke error: a typo.
Sloppy perhaps, but not the same as disingenuous journalism, which is a much more worrying trend.

Carry on...
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 19:35
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Originally Posted by 16024 View Post
1800 miles being 1609km is the result of a single keystroke error: a typo.
Sloppy perhaps, but not the same as disingenuous journalism, which is a much more worrying trend.

Carry on...
Oh! Really?

Which keystroke was that, to get 1609km from 2897 approx?

As for worrying trend, you have looked at the cause of the error, but the reader is only interested in the effect.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 19:41
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Maybe the same guy who calculated profitability?
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 21:22
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To be fair, the BBC has issued a correction to their original online article, changing the emphasis from the original implication that, because of the 'collapse', the prototype had failed,. The original had also ignored the official approval of the production model. The revised article is now much more positive, and makes it clear that the prototype had been deliberately retired, to allow the manufacture of the approved production model.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 22:10
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Originally Posted by langleybaston View Post
Oh! Really?

Which keystroke was that, to get 1609km from 2897 approx?

As for worrying trend, you have looked at the cause of the error, but the reader is only interested in the effect.

The struggle to make 1800 miles equal 1609km by changing a single number might raise an eyebrow or two at OASC.

The rest I agree with.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 22:28
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Originally Posted by 16024 View Post



The struggle to make 1800 miles equal 1609km by changing a single number might raise an eyebrow or two at OASC.

The rest I agree with.
Think obviously 1000 miles rather than the fat finger 1800 number.
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Old 13th Jan 2019, 22:30
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Originally Posted by langleybaston View Post
Oh! Really?

Which keystroke was that, to get 1609km from 2897 approx?

As for worrying trend, you have looked at the cause of the error, but the reader is only interested in the effect.
I could be miles wide of the mark here, but perhaps the stated 1800 miles equallng 1609km was actually 1000 miles becoming 1609 km...?

/Al

Edit: I'm significantly unimpressed with Etudiant's ability to beat me to the punch by two minutes. Fake news...
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 01:52
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Originally Posted by pettinger93 View Post
To be fair, the BBC has issued a correction to their original online article, changing the emphasis from the original implication that, because of the 'collapse', the prototype had failed,. The original had also ignored the official approval of the production model. The revised article is now much more positive, and makes it clear that the prototype had been deliberately retired, to allow the manufacture of the approved production model.
The revised report is very positive indeed. So positive as to suggest a lightly rehashed PR release, perhaps. Especially with the claim that six successful (by what measure?) flights by the prototype is a good place from which to start series production.

I know the aircraft is not held up by hot air, but I sometimes wonder about the organisation behind it.
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 08:25
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Originally Posted by Asturias56 View Post
I wonder if they'll continue or just trouser the insurance cash - that's probably the wisest thing to do TBH
If they're smart, they'll walk away with the cash.
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 11:08
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So they have a production permit but retire the only one they have had. What is the news know? Bit confusing how they changed the story. Will they build another one or is the venture terminated?

Last edited by Less Hair; 14th Jan 2019 at 14:12.
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 12:39
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Considering their less than stellar ercord with this beast I suspect they'll try and raise even more money - none of it will be mine
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 13:31
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Hasn't been Bruce Dickinson heavily invested in this project?
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 14:45
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An upbeat report in today's Times confirms that HAV have obtained production approval from CAA.
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 14:53
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Sounds like their PR guys are working overtime - I just can't see this ever working commercially
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Old 14th Jan 2019, 14:54
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Why all the negativity? What's the "less than stellar record" snark all about? A minor accident early in testing? Followed by a successful test programme. Get a life! How many aircraft would we now be without if they'd been dropped for that reason?

That report is highly positive - they've proved the concept and have gained production approval. There's still a long way to go but it's a British success - or are we all so saturated in gloom and self-flagellation that nothing positive can be said about our wonderful country's positive achievements?
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