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PIA - fake pilots and cabin crew

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PIA - fake pilots and cabin crew

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Old 6th Jan 2019, 23:37
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
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Originally Posted by ironbutt57 View Post
the degree requirement was a carry-over from the "boys club" days of airline pilots being taken strictly from the military
That may be a factor for pilots - my post was directed more generically at US businesses in general. Many companies require college degrees as a prerequisite - even when the degree is completely unrelated to the position being filled - as a method to partially compensate for the inability to ask meaningful questions.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 03:49
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: FL, USA
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Originally Posted by flown-it View Post
I have 15K+ hours, Type rated on B737, B757, B767, A319 and G-V, G-550. Also check airman on the 737 and Gulfstreams. Applied for a job with a company which operated all those types. No interview even though I had a letter of recommendation. Reason? I do not have a degree. So a degree in basket weaving is better than half a century of accident free flying?
Underwater basket weaving.
Type rated C525(s), 737 and 747
11,500hrs, hardly a scratch ever.
No degree and Iíll happily argue Iím a prime example as to why you wouldnít need a degree.
Delta seems to think so.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 10:05
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
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As a question to the European pilots here, do cadets in Ab Initio programs need a prior degree or do the airlines track their progress throughout training to see if he or she will be a decent fit for them?
No, they do not. Some have a degree(s) but it's not requirement. Pre-course selection is used to identify candidates thought suitable for the employer, although student's are assessed throughout training in terms of technical competency of course. Unusual but occasionally the odd one or two don't make it through type-rating once exposed to the operators own trainers.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 11:00
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
A big part of the reason why US companies often require college degrees is that the rules regarding what you can ask a potential employee have become so restrictive. Several years ago when my supervisor was screening people for an opening in my group, he wanted me to sit in on the interview. In order to be allowed to do that, I had to take a class on what I could say, ask, or do during the interview. Questions that you could ask about the interviewee's background were heavily restricted.
So, since you're not allowed to ask many of the questions that might actually demonstrate the person's suitability for the job, they require a degree. It's a poor substitute, but the HR types figure it's better than nothing.

But lying about your qualifications is a pretty good bet to get you fired if you're found out.
Just out of interest: what are the questions you would have liked to ask, but were told not to ask?
IĎve interviewed a lot of folks here in Europe and we always got down to business.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 12:10
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Dan_Brown View Post
Is anyone on board able to inform me and other unwashed, why a degree is needed to operate an a/c??
A degree isnít needed to operate an aircraft.

But I think the question some are asking is why a degree is needed by some airlines to operate their aircraft.

An employer only has limited scope to analyse whether you will be able to become a competent operator of their aircraft, and a good employee.

At high school you are spoon fed. To gain a degree you must apply yourself in an unsupervised environment. If you can succeed at this, this is an indicator of your learning ability and self-discipline - attributes important of a good airline pilot.

It still doesnít mean you will make a good pilot, thatís why there are other aspects to the application process, but it means you probably have at least some of the attributes required, and you will be a lower risk applicant.

The degree doesnít usually even need to be in a related field, because itís the attributes that are important, not any particular knowledge.

That doesnít mean for one second that a non-degree applicant wonít be just as good, itís just that the employer doesnít know that at that point.

My employer doesnít require a degree, but certainly looks favourably on applicants with one.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 21:35
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by AviatorDave View Post


Just out of interest: what are the questions you would have liked to ask, but were told not to ask?
IĎve interviewed a lot of folks here in Europe and we always got down to business.
It's been long enough I don't recall details, but what I recall is that we were very limited in what we could ask about the persons past or their previous employment. Personal life was a big no-no.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 21:58
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
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Originally Posted by Derfred View Post


A degree isnít needed to operate an aircraft.

But I think the question some are asking is why a degree is needed by some airlines to operate their aircraft.

An employer only has limited scope to analyse whether you will be able to become a competent operator of their aircraft, and a good employee.

At high school you are spoon fed. To gain a degree you must apply yourself in an unsupervised environment. If you can succeed at this, this is an indicator of your learning ability and self-discipline - attributes important of a good airline pilot.

It still doesnít mean you will make a good pilot, thatís why there are other aspects to the application process, but it means you probably have at least some of the attributes required, and you will be a lower risk applicant.

The degree doesnít usually even need to be in a related field, because itís the attributes that are important, not any particular knowledge.

That doesnít mean for one second that a non-degree applicant wonít be just as good, itís just that the employer doesnít know that at that point.

My employer doesnít require a degree, but certainly looks favourably on applicants with one.
Pretty much agree with that. A degree only proves you have the ability to attend some of the lectures and turn up for the exams. Lie on any of your qualifications then every single qualifcation then becomes suspect even if you obtained them correctly.
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Old 8th Jan 2019, 11:29
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
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Although what is being said is correct and work experience far outweighs academic experience, what is also correct is meeting the requirements of visa issue. A lot of the countries around the world have a mandatory requirement of a degree for employment visa issue.
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Old 8th Jan 2019, 11:49
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Although what is being said is correct and work experience far outweighs academic experience,
My experience many years ago in an IT environment. My company recruited from existing staff from any department who had the right aptitude and attitude.
The work environment was very good and so enjoyable producing real results.
Then there was a merger with a company who had always insisted on a degree for all staff recruited.
Many seemed to think that they were owed a job , did not work hard, had no common sense ( no real experience working with people) and thought they were above all others.
The result was the vast majority of the staff at the first company left for better jobs and I for one had to endure working with many who were promoted beyond their capability.
My children were brought up to be good communicators, were good learners but did not achieve top marks in their exams.
Both were quickly accepted to the very top universities in the UK and did well there. The both have very good jobs.
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