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EasyJet to transfer 1400 pilots licence from UK to Austria as a precaution to brexit

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EasyJet to transfer 1400 pilots licence from UK to Austria as a precaution to brexit

Old 18th Sep 2018, 20:56
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
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Originally Posted by Bigpants View Post
If I was not allowed to ever fly to CDG after Brexit and no EU pilots were allowed to fly into London Airports I would be quite happy with that.

All those passengers can just take the train but perhaps after a week of post Brexit reciprocal self harm some common sense might return?
Well, that should be easily done: just convince Theresa, Boris and the other sidekickers to swallow the bitter pill and do as Switzerland, Norway etc have done. What do they expect? To cut themselves a different deal? How long before the other EASA, no-EU members start to kick their can down the road? It is an utter mess but for once I don't see why the EU should step back on the UK whine when the other 27 members are doing just fine with EASA.

I also have to ditch my UK CAA license but, after a recent SICKENING experience with them, perhaps this is the only sensible thing to do. After all there is some evidence of the orchestra still playing while the boat is sinking...

PZ
papazulu is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2018, 21:47
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Airgus View Post
Can someone please share how long does it take to transfer the UK CAA EASA license to the Austro Control EASA or similar?
Also, how long can it cost.
Thanks
If you look up on the IAA's website you figure out it might take anything from 12 to 14 weeks. Probably a bit longer to move to an AESA (Spanish) and it will set you back 170-ish euros. They all have one common bottleneck, tho. It is called UK CAA, they are those who will receive the transfer request and that will have to provide evidence of your ratings and medical records. The bad news is that their licensing office is in total disarray as we speak. Wish us all good luck.

PZ
papazulu is offline  
Old 19th Sep 2018, 02:30
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Because ICAO is the lowest common denominator. Some state licences meant something; showed you’d achieved an admirable standard. Now, it’s all horseshit. The problem with the lowest common denominator is how low it turns out to be, in modern times.
Let me guess, you are from the UK? You know there is no Empire anymore right? Those MBEs and OBEs seem a little odd with no Empire to be an officer in. Anyway, enough fun. There is some truth to what you say about standards but that is merely another reason to have an ICAO standard licence. Airports and regulatory agencies around the world are audited by ICAO so licensing could be the same. Australia has a fairly tough exam system, not many get through with a "kellogs licence". People decry the US system of having the bank of questions available to peruse but they dont seem to crash aeroplanes at any greater rate than Europe do they?
It just beggars belief that the Qantas plots flying into Heathrow on the B787 are not suitable to fly a G registered B787 in the Europe unless they do the fourteen exams. What problem is that solving? How does it enhance safety? So an ICAO licence system which has a strong syallabus and exam system makes more sense. Followed by a jurisdiction specific Air Law exam but again, as time moves on the various difference in air law are becoming less and less.
Icarus2001 is offline  
Old 19th Sep 2018, 18:37
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gordomac View Post
Is it not going to be ever so simple, again, like in the old days ? My UK licence authorised me to fly UK registered aircraft, anywhere in the world. Forget all this JAA , EASA , nonsense. If I wanted to get a job in the USA,I would need a FAA licence to fly N registered aircraft. I , one time , obtained a one-off FAA validation for ferry work or delivery but that was it. Want the licence ? Do the full ground-school and all the exams. We did the same to all others. Want the Uk Licence ? Do all the groundschool & writtens.

When Air Europe went to the wall, we were training the Italian division. But to fly UK registered aircraft, (AE-UK) the AE-Italians had to do all the writtens. Mamamia, poor devils ! They were a lot kinder to us when a select few were given jobs in AE Italy after the AE-Uk demise. We just had to do Air Law but that was nodded & winked away. Quickly, we were flying Italian Registered aircraft on UK licences with Italian Validation. My prized Uk licence was validated for Belgian registered aircraft for a Belgian job. Belgian ATPL given with no requirement for exams. In Holland, Dutch law was required. Transavia gave us a one week course, Dutch Law exam ( I failed and an Oral was required...but that's another story....), passed & given a Dutch validation to fly Dutch registered aircraft all over the world. Finally, Oman just looked at my admired Uk licences and I was quickly ( we all were) given Oman ATPL to fly Oman Registered aircraft, all over the world. That was GulfAir. When the Bahrainis introduced their own CAA and Bahrain registered aircraft, Bahrain ATPL was awarded on verification of the Oman Licence. There was never a validation on the UK Licence but an issue of the local licence on presentation of the Uk one. See how easy it is and has nothing to do with geographical airspace..

Post Brixit,let's just get on with a UK CAA/ARB and fly UK registered aircraft anywhere in the world. It really is that simple. Should you want to fly foreign registered aircraft, you would need the issue of that Country's licence either by validation of the Uk licence or whatever they require.

Oh just remembered, AE casualties who secured employment in Japan had to do the full Jap ATPL. Those who went to Condor, equally, full German ATP. Blimey, made mu Dutch Oral quite a pleasant experience !
You forget that the UK CAA of past is not the same CAA of the present.
Much manpower and resources had been outsourced to EASA.
Your argumentation is therefore flawed.
a350pilots is offline  
Old 20th Sep 2018, 07:50
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by a350pilots View Post
You forget that the UK CAA of past is not the same CAA of the present.
Much manpower and resources had been outsourced to EASA.
Your argumentation is therefore flawed.
The Royal Aeronautical Society has published a thorough report on the options and challenges for the CAA, not only focusing on no deal, but mentioning it. They calculate that around 300 specialist staff have to be hired and trained, as well a needed transition period of at least several years to transfer back all the responsibility. That would not be there in April 2019 at all.

Even if there is no deal in general, i expect there will be some side deals after that is decided for specific areas including aviation, as that would be damaging to both sides, although much more so for the UK than the EU.
Denti is offline  
Old 20th Sep 2018, 11:33
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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I also have to ditch my UK CAA license but, after a recent SICKENING experience with them,
+1

If you look up on the IAA's website you figure out it might take anything from 12 to 14 weeks. Probably a bit longer to move to an AESA (Spanish) and it will set you back 170-ish euros.
170-ish euros ... probably in Spain. Does anyone know how much the IAA charge for the issue of an ATPL ? Did a search on their webpage but could not find that info. In any case, heard that it is a lot more than that ... (something like 650 euros). Is this the correct amount ?
zerograv is offline  
Old 20th Sep 2018, 13:09
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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You want out, this is a logical consequence. If the U.K. maintains its stubborn attitude you have only yourselves to blame. Bed, lie, in it.
I think you’ll find that vast swathes of us are more than happy to maintain a ‘stubborn attitude’ as you put it. The EU stands to lose a hell of a lot more than the U.K.

In reality, there is a zero percent chance that air travel into or out of the U.K. will be affected in any meaningful way at the end of March next year. That said, I’d personally be delighted to see HMG take a firm line and block off U.K. airspace and airports to all EU registered aircraft. Got to make sure all those airlines (LH, KLM, AF, RYR etc. are compliant with U.K. regulations after all, what.)

If the EU wants to play these silly games, the U.K. should show that it can happily push back.
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Old 20th Sep 2018, 17:48
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Air travel in and out of the U.K. will most likely not come to a halt (at least not for long) and I never claimed that to be the logical consequence.

What I mean is EASA membership. U.K. airspace wonít be closed, but you canít operate as a pan-European airline with a U.K. AOC and licences.
Longhitter is offline  
Old 20th Sep 2018, 20:05
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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" The EU stands to lose a hell of a lot more than the U.K."
Head in the sand stupidity. The EU will still have a functioning legal infrastructure for airlines and pilots if the UK crashes out. The UK won't have anything in place, nor will it have functioning agreements with its main partners. (Former partners perhaps we should say)
When will the Brexiteers notice that EU27 have been clear and consistent throughout this process - why would anyone think they're bluffing.
ELondonPax is offline  
Old 21st Sep 2018, 14:48
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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A friend of mine just interviewd for a german based job. He holds a UK issued easa licence . Seems the feedback was that , reading between the lines, they are interviewing UK licence holders, but the would be required to transfer to another easa competent authority . Wether this is feasible or not was not mentioned.

so from now on, holders of uk issued part fcl will have to change authority until this mess is sorted. What a mess.
highfive is offline  
Old 21st Sep 2018, 15:16
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by highfive View Post
A friend of mine just interviewd for a german based job. He holds a UK issued easa licence . Seems the feedback was that , reading between the lines, they are interviewing UK licence holders, but the would be required to transfer to another easa competent authority . Wether this is feasible or not was not mentioned.

so from now on, holders of uk issued part fcl will have to change authority until this mess is sorted. What a mess.
Did they tell him to apply for German (or other EU) citizenship too I wonder?

Seems to me that if a deal is done, then the licence issues should be sorted with it, if it's No Deal, then expats on both sides of the new fence will potentially be kicked out anyway. Commuting between UK and EU won't be possible (via Canada or Russia maybe) since no planes will fly between, and the trains will be stopped (says France).

I wonder how easy it will be to switch back to (or reacquire) UK licence after a hard brexit - relies on the CAA being in a fit state to manage stuff outside EASA - wouldn't that potentially leave people unable to work where they are allowed to live, and unable to live where they are allowed to work?
infrequentflyer789 is offline  
Old 21st Sep 2018, 16:11
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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The EU stands to lose a hell of a lot more than the U.K.
I hear this so many times, from the everyman in the street on radio phone-ins to political talking heads like Farage and Rees-Mogg.
It beggers belief that with everything that has been said, written about and reported ad-nauseum since the referendum was announced, that inteligent people still believe this. It is, was and always will be utter garbage!

I realise that this thread is about Pilot Licencing, but there are a few thousand Licenced Engineers that were forced to convert to a JAR Part 66 licences and then a full EASA B1/B2 etc. All that is now moot and until someone at no.10 starts making sense, I and my colleagues have no clue how and under what legislation we will able to practice our art come April next year. The CAA Safety Regulation section was already understaffed and barely fit for purpose before all this started, Somehow they are going to have to ramp up their recruitment, training and oversight...in 6 months! Crazy!

Still, Taking back Control....Yay!!
TURIN is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2018, 03:16
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Is there any chance of the British ATPL coming back to life?
brown_eyes is offline  

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