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British Airways flight from London U.K. to Calgary diverted to Iqaluit

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British Airways flight from London U.K. to Calgary diverted to Iqaluit

Old 13th Sep 2018, 00:18
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British Airways flight from London U.K. to Calgary diverted to Iqaluit

British Airways flight from London U.K. to Calgary diverted to Iqaluit

A British Airways flight from London U.K. to Calgary has been diverted to Iqaluit Airport.

The plane landed shortly after 7 p.m. local time

Sarah Rieger · CBC News · Posted: Sep 12, 2018 6:00 PM MT Last Updated: 5 minutes ago
Fire, police and EMS crews respond to a British Airways plane that was diverted to Iqaluit on a flight from London U.K. to Calgary Wednesday evening. (Travis Burke/CBC)
A British Airways flight from London, U.K., to Calgary has been diverted to Iqaluit Airport.

The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner landed shortly after 7 p.m. local time Wednesday in Nunavut, roughly five-and-a-half hours into the roughly eight-hour flight.Emergency crews responded to the plane on the runway.
British Airways flight 103 from London to Calgary landed at Iqaluit Airport roughly five-and-a-half hours into the nine-hour flight. (Jimi Onalik)The jets can seat up to 216 passengers, according to the British Airways website.

CBC Calgary has reached out to British Airways for details on why the flight was diverted.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 00:28
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 00:37
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I've sure had Frobay as an ETOPS alternate a few times over the years but I've never had the pleasure of landing there.

Sounds like Speedbird One Yankee Charlie diverted for electrical or airconditioning fumes on the flight deck, shut down on runway 16-34, got checked out by Red One and the rest of the CFR crew. Restarted engines and taxied to the ramp to deplane the pax to the terminal. Speedbird called HQ in LHR to confirm the plan for deplaning. A pax requested medical assistance for arm and chest pain and paramedics were boarded prior to pax deplaning.

http://archive-server.liveatc.net/cy...2018-2300Z.mp3
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 10:50
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Etops Nightmare, Smoke and fire!

All well that ends well. Good job BA.
Now for the recovery!

On a thread drift I would like to bring to attention the fact that Denmark is considering closing Bluie West 8 or formerly called Søndre Strømfjord.
For You long haul chaps with a northern route I think this has some consequences.
Mind You they are intending to expand two other airports on Greenland to 2000 meters first!

The thought of electric smoke and fire is a thing that does make me feel uncomfortable, to say the least.
Not to many options up there.
Regards
Cpt B
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 12:14
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Should be interesting finding accommodation for everyone in that neck of the world!
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 12:53
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Indeed. We used to marshall our mining exploration rotational crews through there. Apart from Cambridge Bay and Ft. Resolution, it's about as remote as you can get...

Hope it wasn't a full flight - or it might be 200+ camp-beds in the hockey rink time.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 13:48
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Originally Posted by BluSdUp View Post
On a thread drift I would like to bring to attention the fact that Denmark is considering closing Bluie West 8 or formerly called Søndre Strømfjord.
Regards
Cpt B
Eh, no. Søndre Strømfjord, along with all other villages and places in Greenland, have had their Danish names replaced by Greenlandic ditto. Thus Søndre Strømfjord is now Kangerlussuaq. 'Bluie West 8' ceased to be in 1992, when the airport was handed over to Greenland for civilian use. Thus, the naming sequence is Bluie West 8 -> Søndre Strømfjord -> Kangerlussuaq. IATA code is SFJ, ICAO is BGSF - they weren't changed.

The plan is to extend the existing runways in Nuuk and Ilulissat to a lenght of 2200 meters, and construct a third airport from scratch in Qaqortoq, with a 1500 meter runaway. The future of Kangerlussuaq has not been finally settled, but the tentative plan is to reduce it to a heliport. There's hardly anybody living in or around Kangerlussuaq, which means most passengers flying to Greenland are only stopping there to transfer onto a domestic fixed- or rotary-wing service.to their intended destination.

I don't quite understand how a 2200 meter runway will be sufficient for an A330 doing the service to CPH; seems to be a bit on the short side.

Last edited by SMT Member; 13th Sep 2018 at 13:59.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 15:03
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I am old git.
I have calibrated in Narsasuaq ( Bluie West 1) GodtHåb ( Nuuk) Søndre Strøm and Jacobshavn, in OY-NUK in 1994.
Great trip. I also flew for the Indians at Muskrat Dam in Ontario in 1992.
I see now that I was not politically correct,,,,,

Standard operation with a A330 into Nuuk with 2200 meters to CPH is OK, but it better be CAT3c.
As fare as N-1 on any diversion on a dark and stormy night, I would like to have Søndrestrøm still as an option.
But I cant say I have analysed it in detail, but if I go longhaul , I most certainly shall.
Regards
Cpt B
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 15:38
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I am perfectly aware that fumes / electrical burning smell in the cockpit are an emergency (had it myself....), but why would you stop on the rwy right before an intersection and not turn off? Would take about 20 more seconds and if you *really* have a problem blocking the rwy especially at a remote location might not be the best idea.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 15:58
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Maybe the fire service asked them to?
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 16:05
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Possibly they autolanded to a stop so that the aircraft would stay on centreline if view deteriorated?
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 16:06
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Originally Posted by 172driver View Post
I am perfectly aware that fumes / electrical burning smell in the cockpit are an emergency (had it myself....), but why would you stop on the rwy right before an intersection and not turn off? Would take about 20 more seconds and if you *really* have a problem blocking the rwy especially at a remote location might not be the best idea.
Think Manchester 1985
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 16:59
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Originally Posted by 172driver View Post
I am perfectly aware that fumes / electrical burning smell in the cockpit are an emergency (had it myself....), but why would you stop on the rwy right before an intersection and not turn off? Would take about 20 more seconds and if you *really* have a problem blocking the rwy especially at a remote location might not be the best idea.
because the runway is the best place to be for an evacuation. Good overview and hard surface all around means good approach for emergency services.
You can always tow it away..
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 17:26
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Landed there in a chartered Hawaiian Airlines L1011 for fuel, out of Gatwick to SFO via Seattle, back in 1985?
We took turns sticking our noses out of the open door to get some fresh air.
Remote does not describe it!!!!!.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 22:19
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[QUOTE=SMT Member;10248341]Eh, no. Søndre Strømfjord, along with all other villages and places in Greenland, have had their Danish names replaced by Greenlandic ditto. Thus Søndre Strømfjord is now Kangerlussuaq. 'Bluie West 8' ceased to be in 1992, when the airport was handed over to Greenland for civilian use. Thus, the naming sequence is Bluie West 8 -> Søndre Strømfjord -> Kangerlussuaq. IATA code is SFJ, ICAO is BGSF - they weren't changed.

I flew into BGSF from 1968 to 1972 and the only name we knew was Søndre Strømfjord. That was what was on the approach plates we used. I later learned that around the WW II period the Bluie West names were used in Greenland but I don't know when that was dropped. I know that Inuit names are being used in Greenland and apparently Northern Canada but I also don't know when that began.
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 01:34
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Originally Posted by er340790 View Post
Hope it wasn't a full flight - or it might be 200+ camp-beds in the hockey rink time.
Back when we were doing the final certification testing of the 747-8, it was discovered that GEnx-2B engines didn't like to start when it was really, really cold (~-30 F or below), and we needed to develop a fix, fast. GE brainstormed some software tweaks to the starting logic, and Iqaluit was the only place they could find cold enough that we could go to test to see if any of the tweaks worked.
We needed to cold soak the aircraft overnight so the entire flight test and mechanic crew (~50 people) spent the night there. We didn't max out the available hotel space, but it was close...
Oh yea, and one of the tweaks to the logic worked great - engines started right up.
While we were preparing for the test, one of the flight test pilots cracked that this was one of those places where "There is a beautiful girl behind every tree". Suffice so say there wasn't a tree to be seen (and little else besides snow). Best I could describe it was like being above timberline, but without the mountains (or much of any elevation change - just some small hills).
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 01:50
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I know that Inuit names are being used in Greenland and apparently Northern Canada but I also don't know when that began.
According to Wikipedia, Frobisher Bay became Iqualuit in 1987.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iqaluit

I knew Iqualuit was well above the tree line, because I've been there for a fuel stop, but I didn't realize how much further south the tree line is in eastern Canada, as opposed to the west.



From "Inuvik and Iqaluit, tale of two cities: Canadian arctic from east to west":
https://tinyurl.com/y9qtplys

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Old 14th Sep 2018, 06:15
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In 1966 Wardair started regular transatlantic operations from West and Eastern Canada to many UK and European airports using their new 727-11 CF-FUN

The airplane did a round trip to Europe each day in summer 1966 and had a utilization of over eighteen flying hours a day, far above any other 727 operator. The airplane rotated through Gatwick Airport nearly every day from Canada so that there was talk that the company had several 727’s.
Boeing and Transport Canada worked with Wardair and determined that the B727 could be operated with better fuel reserves than the previous piston engine operations utilizing long range cruise power settings and a modification to the fuel tank system to increase the range.

Their main refuelling stop was sondre stromfjord (Kangerlussuaq) airport in Greenland, Due to the influence of the very cold Greenland Ice Cap with its dominant and consistent high pressure area, the outflow winds off the ice cap kept the weather at the airbase unusually clear especially during the summer. The long runway is situated at the ice cap end of the fjord. One way in and one way out. The USAF operated a radar unit which allowed a safe approach to the runway even though the terrain along the fjord walls rose up in some areas over two thousand feet.
Frobisher Bay (Iqaluit) and Keflavik were used as alternates, along with Gander, Goose Bay, Shannon and Prestwick.

These refuelling stops in Greenland, the frozen North, and Iceland were very popular as the passengers were able shop duty free and, as well, purchase native artifacts, stretch their legs and claim they had been to the Arctic!

I wonder if the BA 787 pax did also enjoy ultimately their unplanned pop into the Frozen North?

The 727 was flown with two pilots, a navigator and a maintenance qualified flight engineer. Four stewardesses served the filet steaks on Royal Doulton china along with the complimentary drinks. It was a wonderful era in the airline world for passengers and the flight crews as well.
The inflight entertainment was playing Bingo...with small prizes offered by the crew.

The 727 famously flew 3411nm (3927m) non-stop in Nov 1970 from Windsor (Ont) - LGW in 6h 39m.

Anecdotes courtesy of Don Saunders of Wardair.

Last edited by rog747; 14th Sep 2018 at 06:29.
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 06:24
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The problem sounds like a dodgy battery. Interested to hear the result of an enquiry.
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 10:44
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Originally Posted by rog747 View Post
In 1966 Wardair started regular transatlantic operations from West and Eastern Canada to many UK and European airports using their new 727-11 CF-FUN

The airplane did a round trip to Europe each day in summer 1966 and had a utilization of over eighteen flying hours a day, far above any other 727 operator. The airplane rotated through Gatwick Airport nearly every day from Canada so that there was talk that the company had several 727’s.
Boeing and Transport Canada worked with Wardair and determined that the B727 could be operated with better fuel reserves than the previous piston engine operations utilizing long range cruise power settings and a modification to the fuel tank system to increase the range.

Their main refuelling stop was sondre stromfjord (Kangerlussuaq) airport in Greenland, Due to the influence of the very cold Greenland Ice Cap with its dominant and consistent high pressure area, the outflow winds off the ice cap kept the weather at the airbase unusually clear especially during the summer. The long runway is situated at the ice cap end of the fjord. One way in and one way out. The USAF operated a radar unit which allowed a safe approach to the runway even though the terrain along the fjord walls rose up in some areas over two thousand feet.
Frobisher Bay (Iqaluit) and Keflavik were used as alternates, along with Gander, Goose Bay, Shannon and Prestwick.

These refuelling stops in Greenland, the frozen North, and Iceland were very popular as the passengers were able shop duty free and, as well, purchase native artifacts, stretch their legs and claim they had been to the Arctic!

I wonder if the BA 787 pax did also enjoy ultimately their unplanned pop into the Frozen North?

The 727 was flown with two pilots, a navigator and a maintenance qualified flight engineer. Four stewardesses served the filet steaks on Royal Doulton china along with the complimentary drinks. It was a wonderful era in the airline world for passengers and the flight crews as well.
The inflight entertainment was playing Bingo...with small prizes offered by the crew.

The 727 famously flew 3411nm (3927m) non-stop in Nov 1970 from Windsor (Ont) - LGW in 6h 39m.

Anecdotes courtesy of Don Saunders of Wardair.

According to my wife of 50 years (who worked the reception desk at Ye Olde Felbridge Hotel near Gatwick) there are many more anecdotes for telling of Wardair crews night-stopping in the hotel!
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