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UA5869 Engine fire at landing

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UA5869 Engine fire at landing

Old 4th Jul 2017, 01:10
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I think those CRJ's are 50-seater, plus a crew of 3, 2 up front and one in the cabin.
We flew into Denver on one last wednesday, and out on another 4 hours later.
The CRJ comes in a number of variants. SkyWest, the airline involved has a number of seating capacities depending upon scope limits and partner airlines needs. At the lower end are CRJ-200s with 50 seats, ranging up to 76 seats on CRJ-900 frames.
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 02:39
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The FAA Incident Notification says there was a tire fire. Also, I get N796SK as the registration for SKW 5869 ASE-DEN on July 2, 2017.

02-JUL-17
Time: 20:19:00Z
Regis#: N792SK
Aircraft Make: BOMBARIER
Aircraft Model: CL600
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
LOCATION
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO
Country: UNITED STATES

DESCRIPTION

Description:
N792SK SKYWEST AIRLINES FLIGHT SKW5869 BOMBARDIER CL600 AIRCRAFT, ON LANDING, REPORTED A TIRE FIRE SPREAD TO THE ENGINE, ALL PERSONS ON BOARD DEPLANED WITHOUT INJURIES, FIRE EXTINQUISHED, DAMAGE UNKNOWN, DENVER, CO
http://www.asias.faa.gov/pls/apex/f?...L-17,BOMBARIER
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 07:32
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by West Coast View Post
The CRJ comes in a number of variants. SkyWest, the airline involved has a number of seating capacities depending upon scope limits and partner airlines needs. At the lower end are CRJ-200s with 50 seats, ranging up to 76 seats on CRJ-900 frames.
And their CRJ7 fleet, the type involved in the incident, have 66 or 70 seats depending on configuration.
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 08:58
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Airbubba View Post
For any CRJ drivers out there - would it be normal to shut down an engine immediately after clearing the runway to save fuel? Would it make sense on a hot day in Denver? Or, would there be a cool down period required with these motors?

I've seen many engine shutdown policies come and go over the years to save fuel and in some cases brake wear.

In my experience, both personal and anecdotal, two times that engines are more likely to catch fire is when they start and when they are shut down.
We shut the lft engine down (#1) after 2 minutes has elapsed since landing unless operationally required (for example parking in the horseshoe at B concourse in DEN or potentially slippery taxiways). The CRJ700 can usually pump out enough air on one engine to not require the APU except on the hottest of days. The 200... well get that APU on and transfer the bleeds before engine shut down.

Last edited by zondaracer; 6th Jul 2017 at 16:51. Reason: For some reason I said right engine.
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 16:16
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The 200... well get that APU on and transfer the bleeds before engine shut down.
Preferably before 10K during the summer, there is zero bleed pressure during descent coming off he engines on the 200, makes a big difference in keeping the cabin reasonable.
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 17:20
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Thanks for all of the insight to the engine shutdowns for taxi on the CRJ.

I'm puzzled by the mention of a tire fire in the FAA incident report posted above. The wheels look fine in the photos I've seen. Also, the LiveATC.net feeds don't seem to have any mention of a tire on fire in the ATC or fire crew clips. The ATC feeds are scanning several channels and miss some transmissions but I would think that a tire fire would be a discussion item for the crash crew as they knocked down the engine fire and made sure no one was left onboard. The ARFF folks are recorded on a separate LiveATC.net feed at DEN.
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 17:38
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An aircraft following the incident aircraft initially reported a tire fire then corrected the statement to an APU fire, neither of which was correct.
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 18:07
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Thanks, glad I asked. I was scrubbing the ground control tape, the brake fire reporting aircraft was back on tower. I think the controller was working both freqs at the time.

AX4751 reported a brake fire on the right, number 2 side of the CRJ on F then said it's not a brake fire at all, looks like fire dumping out of the APU or engine compartment.

You can hear the initial fire report at about 18:25 into this clip:

http://archive-server.liveatc.net/kd...2017-2000Z.mp3
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Old 4th Jul 2017, 20:36
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Glad to see someone questioning the tire fire information.
That is clearly fuel burning on the ground behind the engine.
The failure sequence probably went something like this:

What is more likely is that some fuel system component outside of the core engine failed inflight and began leaking. While inflight, the airflow probably kept it separated from a combustion source.

After landing, the airflow around the core engine changed and a puddle of fuel developed inside the duct or inside the cowling. It was lit off then and fuel continued to be added until the engine was shut down. (Was there a cough or bang out of the engine during the rollout? )

If the fire had started inflight, the crew likely would have received some warning, but that does not appear to have happened from the info I've seen.
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Old 5th Jul 2017, 12:48
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Once you have shut down an engine, would you still receive a fire warning from it, or is it deactivated as well in that case?
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Old 5th Jul 2017, 15:49
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It's not deactivated

It is dependent on the placement of fire loops to detect the fire.

In some rare cases it's possible to locally burn through an engine case and directly into the fan discharge flow path without being detected (fuel manifold dislodged etc.).

As somebody pointed out earlier, in-flight engine fires are different from fires on the ground.

There are lots of investigative questions still to be answered in this event so await the results.
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