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IATA concerned about increase in problem passengers

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IATA concerned about increase in problem passengers

Old 3rd Oct 2016, 21:30
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That's exactly why I said "normally."
'Normally' shouldn't really have any place in this industry, when the consequences could be dire.

What's the longest journey it's possible to make with the airlines? 36 hours all in? Shouldn't it be possible to go without a drink for such a, relatively, short time? Don't get me wrong, I enjoy a glass of bubbly and a nice red with what passes for food on board, but it's a privilege which should merit serious consideration in this day and age.
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Old 3rd Oct 2016, 21:42
  #22 (permalink)  
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Non-alcoholic wine?

I know that when I first tried it in the 1970s it was 'rubbish'.

Has it improved? (to the extent of being 'acceptable'?

I agree with prohibiting carry-on of 'duty free'.
The amount of flammable spirit being carried both ways surely constitutes a hazard?

Change the regulations to permit purchase after the flight (maybe with vouchers if necessary).
Allowing pax access to their own duty-free alcohol is madness IMO.
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Old 3rd Oct 2016, 22:07
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"duty free"...

Most of the destinations that cause us the most trouble, IBZ, PMI, ALC are within the EU, and so it is not duty free. In many cases it is more expensive than in your local shop. It is the mindset that says you need to buy a bottle of vodka for a 2 1/2 hour flight...

And out of 200+ pax, only a few will be a problem - why should the other 95% be denied a drink to start the holiday they may have been saving all year for?

Stronger penalties, the sale of only true duty-free, and the banning of airport shops selling miniatures - why would they do that? The airports and airport shops hold more responsibility here than the airlines...
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Old 3rd Oct 2016, 22:10
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HT - You are right, education has to be the answer. But how long do we have to wait? I'm sure there are cabin crew have sweats as soon as they see they are going to do a Friday night Corfu, Alicante, Ibiza etc. I'd hate to be in their position and I don't see why they or their fellow passengers should have to put up with the behaviour that we know will be exhibited on such flights.

A very public hard in-your-face reaction, imprisonment and a grotesque fine and subsequent destruction of that person's life will be a good lesson to others. We are not trying to educate the perpetrator; they are now a lost cause. We are trying to educate those who might misbehave in aircraft in the future.
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Old 3rd Oct 2016, 22:59
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they will just "pre-drink" at or before arriving at the airport. making airports and aircraft "dry" achieves nothing apart from making air travel more miserable than it already is.

standard routine: handcuffs, police, large fine, no fly list.
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 00:39
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On the subject of 'no fly' listing, I wonder how the chap who was refused access to a flight from one of the Balearic Islands has got on (or off . . . )?
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 02:01
  #27 (permalink)  
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My experiences are from the "good old days," when I was flight crew on TWA 1964-90. Company policy was for the cabin crew to "pour generously" in First Class, but coach was purchase, limited to two little bottles, plus one wine at meal time. On International the boozed flowed in first class especially, and even in business class, but not in coach.

Never heard of a problem in those days, although I suppose there were some.

Since retirement, I have flown as a passenger a whole lot until perhaps 4 years ago. Again, I didn't see issues like described.

Personally, when I was on first class from JFK to MAD, or wherever, the fantastic meal service would have been dreadful without at least the generous pourings of fine wines.
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 04:00
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Originally Posted by Sunfish
they will just "pre-drink" at or before arriving at the airport. making airports and aircraft "dry" achieves nothing apart from making air travel more miserable than it already is.

standard routine: handcuffs, police, large fine, no fly list.
I'm not so sure about that. If someone is already obviously drunk and/or obnoxious, they can be denied at checkin or security. You wouldn't be removing the problem, but you get to keep it on the ground. In the airport you have ready access to security and/or police - no more need to deal with it in the confined environment of an aircraft.
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 04:30
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Australians are probably the worst, I've kicked of more Aussie's in the last 12 months than I ever did whilst in the U.K for 10 years. It's not just the drinking either, usually smoking and a new trend is mid flight fights.

Why don't airlines chase these clowns for costs? Had a idiot the other week who was on the verge of being kicked off, I reminded him that should I return back to the airport engineering will pass the bill on for overweight landing damage. He never said another word all flight.
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 06:32
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN
Non-alcoholic wine?
Change the regulations to permit purchase after the flight (maybe with vouchers if necessary).
Allowing pax access to their own duty-free alcohol is madness IMO.
SLF point of view. I'd want to buy before flying, but if it had to be retained by airport/airline staff for transport in the hold then perfect. One less thing to carry!

The airports are a big part of the problem. Barmen in the departure lounge bars are failing in their duty under licensing regulations to stop serving alcohol to people who've had enough. In theory they can lose their alcohol license on the spot. There's plenty of cops around, they must surely spot transgressions.

We have the laws necessary for dealing with the problem, they just need to be applied. New rules aren't going to help.
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 12:12
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Drink. FLY. BEHAVE.

I enjoy a drink. I fly a lot. I behave. Had one bad experience with a bunch of golfers new orleans-Orlando. Swearing, consuming booze they brought with them. Disgusting.
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Old 4th Oct 2016, 16:01
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Set a limit - say 35mg (same as driving limit).

If you test positive, you don't board and get a 500 fixed penalty and a 3 month passport ban, If you cause trouble onboard and test positive on arrival, you get a fixed penalty 500 and 3 month passport ban plus any additional charges.

It'll never happen because the profit made on alcohol sales outweighs the perceived risks, agree with station_calling, airport alcohol sales in the EU are often more expensive than supermarkets - What's the point?

Agree with Piltdown, you're not trying to educate the perpetrators, you're making anyone who follows think twice before getting on a plane pi$$ed.
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Old 5th Oct 2016, 11:43
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Divert and ban the drunken brawlers - don't make everyone suffer because a few cheap women behave like boozed-up sluts. They can take the boat or train back to whichever hovel whence they came.

Alcohol on an empty stomach won't help - I see that ba are ditching free economy class food on flights of less than 5 hours from next year. Their solution is to sell you an expensive M&S sandwich - but they won't accept cash, unlike other low cost airlines. For that's what they've become now.
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Old 5th Oct 2016, 12:25
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Come on guys, get with it.

Your typical hen/stag party starts off in the road transport to the airport. Beers, shots, bubbly.....and then they arrive at the airport. Somehow they keep it sensible through security, and then straight into the bar for another half a dozen before boarding.

Some of these parties are literally 'hammered' when walking up the steps.
Some friends of mine recently stayed up all night and THEN traveled to the airport for the flight. They all flew.......

This isn't an airline issue, it's a cultural issue that is not regulated while transiting through the airport. I honestly think banning alcohol on board would see a couple of extra 'downed' in the airport in readiness for the 1 hour hop to Prague.......

Tougher regulation at airports.......simple!
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Old 5th Oct 2016, 12:28
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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The problem is, in 99 out of 100 cases, alcohol.
I don't believe that's the root problem. Although 99% of troublemakers may have been taking alcohol, that's always been there. What has changed in recent years is the ban on smoking, which can upset the addicts. Maybe they resort to alcohol in lieu, maybe they do so every day, but their bodies are unused to extended periods without smoking, and this is why the rise in trouble has coincided with the smoking ban. It would be good to know what proportion of troublemakers are smokers who are being prevented from having one for extended periods.
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Old 5th Oct 2016, 20:15
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Seriously, are you surprised that some Muslims despise us?
That our "civilisation" only has fun when it's pissed,
As a lifelong drinker but never troublesome...
We should stop looking down on others.
To be honest, our way is repulsive...
Let's stop treating it as normal.
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Old 7th Oct 2016, 19:54
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Whilst we have been discussing the semantics of alcohol fuelled passengers, yet another serious incident was about to take place. It happened yesterday on Ryan Air Flight Edinburgh to Alicante. During the altercation a 10 year old child was struck in the head by a flying bottle of wine.
The full article may be accessed at:

Drunken passengers arrested in Spain after causing mayhem in Ryanair jet - Travelandtourworld.comTravelandtourworld.com

On this occasion a child was hit in the head, just imagine what could have happened to this child. When will those in authority say enough is enough and ban alcohol before boarding and during flight.
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Old 7th Oct 2016, 20:36
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Chronus

In my experience the vast vast majority of passengers on most flights behave themselves perfectly well despite having access to alcohol before and during the flight....

Before resorting to a blanket ban it might be better to look at which airlines are having these seemingly recurrent problems and why. Frankly if you deliberately aim to make money off the stag party market and similar demographic you'd be darned silly not to expect problems these days.
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Old 7th Oct 2016, 20:44
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Originally Posted by Chronus
When will those in authority say enough is enough and ban alcohol before boarding and during flight.
Reportedly a brawl involving two separate stag party groups, members of whom were "absolutely hammered" by the time they boarded.

Major fail by whoever handles RYR at EDI.
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Old 7th Oct 2016, 20:52
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Cronus

a 10 year old child was struck in the head by a flying bottle of wine
I am in no way way condoning this behaviour - if they had been on my flight I would have been considering a divert and offload.

However, 1) I don't agree with blanket bans as 95% of the travelling public are decent people capable of making their own decisions and controlling their behaviour, and 2) again, I'm not belittling the incident", but a flying bottle of wine" gives rise to thoughts of a big glass bottle flying through the air - in this instance it would be a small 187ml plastic bottle. Still capable of causing injury I'm sure, but not quite worthy of the headline.

It is a select few few who need dealing with - why do want to legislate against the other 95% of human beings who are decent people?
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