Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Rumours & News
Reload this Page >

16 injured by turbulance - United Airlines. Diverts to SNN

Rumours & News Reporting Points that may affect our jobs or lives as professional pilots. Also, items that may be of interest to professional pilots.

16 injured by turbulance - United Airlines. Diverts to SNN

Old 31st Aug 2016, 11:26
  #1 (permalink)  
Supercalifragilistic
expialidocious
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Essex, UK
Posts: 587
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
16 injured by turbulance - United Airlines. Diverts to SNN

BBC reporting 14 passengers and 2 crew now in hospital in Shannon after a United Airlines flight travelling from Houston to Heathrow hit turbulence leading to a decision to divert.


Shannon Airport emergency landing: 16 in hospital - BBC News
Memetic is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 13:48
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Florida and wherever my laptop is
Posts: 1,350
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Looking at https://earth.nullschool.net/#curren...8.90,34.75,444 you will see the reason for the turbulence a very strong jet looks like the confluence of two 'jet-streaks' (see Entrance of Jet Streaks ) click on 'Earth' for the menu and go up and down in HpA levels to see how the jet varies with altitudes and at the 70HpA level the stratosphere is very quiet. Fly above the tropopause if you want a quiet flight.
Ian W is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 13:59
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 63
Posts: 6,218
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Were they wearing their seat belts?
Lonewolf_50 is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 14:20
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Baston
Posts: 2,519
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"severe and unexpected turbulence".

I assume therefore we are not talking about a Cb, but CAT?

If so, it is, of course over-forecast [or certainly used to be when I hung up the crystal ball and fir-cone with seaweed] but "unexpected" does surprise me.

Do not modern aircraft have on-board detection systems. If so, how good are they?

I ask in all sincerity, as I used to lecture on CAT to the Met Office College and also the RAF but am sadly out-of-date with developments.

As for seat belts, I know enough about CAT to always use mine except for brief trips to the lavatory.
langleybaston is online now  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 14:58
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Earth
Posts: 326
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
currently no system on an aircraft can detect CAT. Can only be predicted, maybe by local TS activity or jet stream but there are no guarantees.
TurningFinalRWY36 is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 15:12
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Seat 0A
Posts: 8,282
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Ian W, what a fascinating map.
Capn Bloggs is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 15:46
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 102
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I agree Capn Bloggs, I have spent far too long looking at this image and playing around with it than I should have today!
32SQDN is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 15:54
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Scotland
Posts: 861
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
There were a lot of people changing levels and avoiding Wx on the Eastbound tracks last night - there was a line of non-painting tops in which the turbulence was reportedly pretty bad.
Jwscud is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 16:40
  #9 (permalink)  
bnt
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland. (No, I just live here.)
Posts: 728
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Every time people are injured due to turbulence, the first question always seems to be about seatbelts, trying to blame the passengers for getting injured. Given the low numbers of injuries, I would surmise that most passengers were wearing their seatbelts. The injured crew would not have been unless they were forewarned. If this happened during a drinks or meal service, well, don't those carts have some sharp edges? Then there's the possibility that bags fell out of the overhead lockers and caused injuries, and more. I know the self-loading freight have a poor rap here, but not everything is their fault ...
bnt is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 17:53
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 17
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
According to a bbc report;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-37228479

John Dunton-Downer from London, said it felt like they were going to crash; "We were told to get out of our seats and sit on the floor"

Eh?
skot is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 18:02
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London (Babylon-on-Thames)
Age: 41
Posts: 6,168
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Just read that too? The bit about sitting on the floor is rubbish?
Skipness One Echo is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 18:39
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Isle of Mull
Age: 83
Posts: 156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Sitting on the floor?
Sitting on the toilet might have saved underwear staining!
jackharr is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2016, 20:57
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 1,248
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Here's an improved version of the cool Earth map.

https://www.windyty.com

You are most welcome.
Contact Approach is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 00:16
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Perth, WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Age: 70
Posts: 853
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jackharr View Post
Sitting on the toilet might have saved underwear staining!
On descent into Calgary many years ago flight hit what I would call "severe" turbulence; I guess from rotor off the back side of the Rockies.
Cabin staff were still collecting trays and immediately went to ground, pushing trollies back to galley on their derrieres, sitting position; definitely not on hands and knees.
Looked to me that they had been trained to do so.
The gentleman reporting on this UA incident may have mis-heard a directive from the FD or purser to the flight attendants, or intended for standing passengers only, not as a general instruction.

Last edited by WingNut60; 1st Sep 2016 at 03:03.
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 00:56
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Seat 0A
Posts: 8,282
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Contact Approach
Here's an improved version of the cool Earth map.
Fantastic!
Capn Bloggs is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 01:07
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Texas, like a whole other country
Posts: 441
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
On descent into Calgary many years ago flight hit what I would call "severe" turbulence; I guess from rotor off the back side of the Rockies.
Cabin staff were still collecting trays and immediately went to ground, pushing trollies back to galley on their derrieres, sitting position; definitely not on hands and knees.
Looked to me that they had been trained to do so.
The gentleman reporting on this UA incident may have mis-heard a directive from the FD or purser to the flight attendants or intended for standing passengers, not as a general instruction.
That would seem to make a lot more sense. Thanks for that.
Carbon Bootprint is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 08:31
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: uk
Posts: 313
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Cabin staff were still collecting trays and immediately went to ground, pushing trollies back to galley on their derrieres, sitting position; definitely not on hands and knees.
Why would that help? Surely both you and the trolley would still end up plastered against the roof if there's a sudden drop?
vancouv is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 08:45
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: BRS/GVA
Posts: 342
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Vancouv - It mitigates any injury. Common turbulence injuries are neck in negative g hitting the ceiling, and ankles and wrists in coming down. Sitting on the floor puts you away from the ceiling as far as possible and gives you something soft to land on when you do come down.
Agree with wingnut, that was definitely an instruction for the mobile pax and crew, not those already buckled in.
hoss183 is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 10:52
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Perth, WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Age: 70
Posts: 853
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by vancouv View Post
Why would that help? Surely both you and the trolley would still end up plastered against the roof if there's a sudden drop?
Well, as mentioned, it "looked" like they were following a trained procedure, but likewise, it could also have just been self-preservation.
I'd be interested to know if it is a commonly-trained procedure from someone who has been there.
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 1st Sep 2016, 11:54
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: NT. Australia
Posts: 39
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I agree Bloggsy, fantastic!:
Deejaypee is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.