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-   -   H225 down in Korea (https://www.pprune.org/rotorheads/626812-h225-down-korea.html)

vaqueroaero 1st Nov 2019 11:57

H225 down in Korea
 
It would appear that an Airbus H225 has crashed into the ocean.

https://m.koreatimes.co.kr/pages/art...newsIdx=278051

Variable Load 1st Nov 2019 12:55

Fuselage found and one body recovered so far.

https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20191101000955315

minigundiplomat 2nd Nov 2019 05:49

Sad news and tragic for the families of those involved.

I think Airbus may have some difficult questions to answer - again.

megan 2nd Nov 2019 06:49


Police officers were watching the chopper after takeoff because it began to fly unsteadily at a low altitude and in a skewed direction. They said the helicopter crashed after flying about 200 meters
I know we love to theorise, take off with no stab engaged? What is the handling like on the 225 in that case?

HeliComparator 2nd Nov 2019 09:00


Originally Posted by megan (Post 10608793)
I know we love to theorise, take off with no stab engaged? What is the handling like on the 225 in that case?

Pretty wobbly, just like any other helicopter (without a stabiliser bar). But with the 225 you engage the autopilot after start and leave it engaged until you are going to shut down. Or at least that’s what you should do!

Flying Bull 2nd Nov 2019 12:53


Originally Posted by HeliComparator (Post 10608846)
Pretty wobbly, just like any other helicopter (without a stabiliser bar). But with the 225 you engage the autopilot after start and leave it engaged until you are going to shut down. Or at least that’s what you should do!

You´re right - but depending on experience, finger trouble, not only disconnecting the upper modes - but all of the stabilization, is a possible scenario?

Jimmy. 2nd Nov 2019 14:39

A "finger fault" disconnecting the SAS is easy to imagine, but a SAR crew crashing an aircraft after take off at VMC and no turbulence is very, very surprising...

malabo 2nd Nov 2019 17:38

Midnight after the sliver moon had already set, shoreline helipad into the inky black. Nothing VMC about it. Should have been routine for a SAR crew, so something went sideways.

SplineDrive 2nd Nov 2019 17:49

They found the fuselage and are attempting to recover the crew/passengers... any news if the rotor and top case landed with the rest of the aircraft?

Jimmy. 2nd Nov 2019 17:59


Originally Posted by malabo (Post 10609174)
Midnight after the sliver moon had already set, shoreline helipad into the inky black. Nothing VMC about it. Should have been routine for a SAR crew, so something went sideways.

You are correct. I have misread the takeoff hour. Happens sometimes when reading at commuting...
:ugh:

nomorehelosforme 2nd Nov 2019 20:35


Originally Posted by SplineDrive (Post 10609185)
They found the fuselage and are attempting to recover the crew/passengers... any news if the rotor and top case landed with the rest of the aircraft?

News report here

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/worl...-off-disputed/

rrekn 3rd Nov 2019 00:58

https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune....98320e7f69.jpg

jolihokistix 3rd Nov 2019 09:12

Further update dragging lumps of parts to the surface.
2 bodies from crashed Dokdo chopper retrieved - The Korea Herald

henra 3rd Nov 2019 11:36


Originally Posted by SplineDrive (Post 10609185)
They found the fuselage and are attempting to recover the crew/passengers... any news if the rotor and top case landed with the rest of the aircraft?

Looking at the circumstances I would bet so. Takeoff from a lighted helipad into the pitch black night over sea. End of flight just 2 minutes after takeoff.
Even with all the gizmos on board Occam's Razor would give a clear direction where this will be going. Whatever the detailed circumstances will have been.

gulliBell 3rd Nov 2019 13:48

"Seven passengers were aboard: one person with a cut finger, five rescue officers and a friend of the injured person."

I'm gobsmacked. A night SAR deployment for somebody with a cut finger. Surely not.

212man 3rd Nov 2019 14:30


Originally Posted by gulliBell (Post 10609817)
"Seven passengers were aboard: one person with a cut finger, five rescue officers and a friend of the injured person."

I'm gobsmacked. A night SAR deployment for somebody with a cut finger. Surely not.

The first article said a severed thumb, but still in no way justifying a night MEDEVAC!

helonorth 3rd Nov 2019 16:12


Originally Posted by 212man (Post 10609848)

The first article said a severed thumb, but still in no way justifying a night MEDEVAC!

Not sure, but I doubt there is any differentiation between day and night for a flight like that, usually only weather. They should be well prepared to fly in the dark. Also, there are certain protocols that are followed by first responders called "quality of life". Nobody is going to die from a severed thumb, etc, but if a timely flight is the only way reattaching an appendage is possible, air is called. I don't make the rules.

skadi 3rd Nov 2019 17:27


Originally Posted by 212man (Post 10609848)

The first article said a severed thumb, but still in no way justifying a night MEDEVAC!

Disagree! The outcome of a replantation is the earlier the better the patient is in an approbiate traumacenter. A thumb is not a part of your body you could easily renounce for manual work force, especially if you are of younger age.

skadi

ShyTorque 3rd Nov 2019 17:36


Originally Posted by 212man (Post 10609848)

The first article said a severed thumb, but still in no way justifying a night MEDEVAC!

It doesn't surprise me. In my (pre-NVG) SAR days I was called to more than a few highly exaggerated, allegedly "life or death" cases. One involved going single pilot to a wire infested, unlit site in the hills on a moonless night to rescue a drunk who turned out to have a relatively minor cut on his hand, self induced on a broken beer bottle. Another involved a jungle landing to a soldier with an alleged broken spine. Having risked the aircraft and crew, the patient walked out normally with the rest of his platoon and climbed on the aircraft unaided. A third involved rescuing a "very seriously ill" sailor some 85 miles offshore from a fishing boat. On reaching him, he was stiff as a board and had obviously died the day before. We were probably called to avoid the boat having to dock or continue trying to fish with a cadaver on board, the latter being considered a bad omen.

helonorth 3rd Nov 2019 21:01


Originally Posted by ShyTorque (Post 10609967)


It doesn't surprise me. In my (pre-NVG) SAR days I was called to more than a few highly exaggerated, allegedly "life or death" cases. One involved going single pilot to a wire infested, unlit site in the hills on a moonless night to rescue a drunk who turned out to have a relatively minor cut on his hand, self induced on a broken beer bottle. Another involved a jungle landing to a soldier with an alleged broken spine. Having risked the aircraft and crew, the patient walked out normally with the rest of his platoon and climbed on the aircraft unaided. A third involved rescuing a "very seriously ill" sailor some 85 miles offshore from a fishing boat. On reaching him, he was stiff as a board and had obviously died the day before. We were probably called to avoid the boat having to dock or continue trying to fish with a cadaver on board, the latter being considered a bad omen.

Ah, memory lane. "And here I was..."


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