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-   -   Zephire helicopter parachute (https://www.pprune.org/rotorheads/617182-zephire-helicopter-parachute.html)

Nige321 12th Jan 2019 09:58

Zephire helicopter parachute
 
Not see this mentioned before...

ShyTorque 12th Jan 2019 11:22

I never fly that high. What's the minimum altitude for successful deployment/stabilisation of descent?

Nige321 12th Jan 2019 11:54

A bit of digging... Zephir website


Zefhir is the first helicopter in the world to be fitted with an innovative ballistic parachute rescue system.

The parachute offers an unprecedented level of safety in emergency conditions when autorotation is not an option.

Equally significant is the extremely low minimum deployment altitude of only 150 m (450 ft).


SASless 12th Jan 2019 12:42

I will have to get a second cup of coffee and think about this a bit before responding.

Having flown helicopters for more than a few years and been involved in both military and civilian parachute jumping....and having an air bag equipped vehicle......I have some questions about the system being undertaken.

Bell_ringer 12th Jan 2019 12:54

If you look at the system in light fixed wing aircraft the safe height is 1500ft

Two's in 12th Jan 2019 13:53

Assuming this company has done its homework, it would be interesting to see what data they are using to establish the frequency of

emergency conditions when autorotation is not an option.
If (amazingly) it shows that low-time PPLs in small, low inertia, aircraft are likely to be in this position more than other rotary pilots, there's always a dichotomy in adding weight and complexity to a small helicopter to increase safety. Good for them if it works, but until then, I'll keep watching the RRPM gauge and listening to the engine note.

SASless 12th Jan 2019 14:07

Thinking about this....what could possibly go wrong?

212man 12th Jan 2019 14:12

Itís so safe that they tested it without pilots on board! Thereís a message there I think. Even Martin Baker use(d) real people.

SASless 12th Jan 2019 16:50

Thinking of volunteering for Test Pilot duty are you 212Man?

ShyTorque 12th Jan 2019 16:50


Originally Posted by SASless (Post 10358775)
Thinking about this....what could possibly go wrong?

So the pilot flies thinking "If the donk stops I don't need to lower the lever, I allow the Nr to decay and deploy the chute. The chute didn't deploy - oh bother!"

212man 12th Jan 2019 17:26


Originally Posted by SASless (Post 10358875)
Thinking of volunteering for Test Pilot duty are you 212Man?

No thanks -,quite happy with my current job!

timprice 12th Jan 2019 17:50

I know it's a bit early for April fools lads, but come on this is really funny!!!!:O

Ascend Charlie 12th Jan 2019 18:13

Well, this is the system that our future transport will depend upon - the Fabulous Electric Drone Taxi of the Sky!

chopjock 12th Jan 2019 19:54


Originally Posted by ShyTorque (Post 10358876)
So the pilot flies thinking "If the donk stops I don't need to lower the lever, I allow the Nr to decay and deploy the chute. The chute didn't deploy - oh bother!"

Obviously enter autorotation first, establish a ROD then deploy the shute, then confirm deployment of shute before gently raising lever to bleed off RRPM and apply rotor brake I should think... Could be useful if donk quits at night or IIMC etc or if over a city where you would not want a spinning rotor to decapitate pedestrians...

ShyTorque 12th Jan 2019 20:35


Originally Posted by chopjock (Post 10358972)
Obviously enter autorotation first, establish a ROD then deploy the shute, then confirm deployment of shute before gently raising lever to bleed off RRPM and apply rotor brake I should think... Could be useful if donk quits at night or IIMC etc or if over a city where you would not want a spinning rotor to decapitate pedestrians...

So if you just want to squash them, that's fine.

SASless 12th Jan 2019 22:16

212 Man....seems to have lost. his sense of adventure since I last had a Heineken with him at the famous Container Bar in Igdugboe!

bront 12th Jan 2019 23:36

Going to be pretty if it accidently deploys.

Photonic 13th Jan 2019 01:52

Imagine the sequence with that field where it set down, with some high-tension power lines in the background. At least with an auto, you have a little control over where you're going to set down. With a parachute, you're at the mercy of the wind.

A ballistic parachute is a reasonable option for single-engine Cirrus planes, because the alternative is finding a big patch of open area to glide into. Not always easy in built-up areas, hostile terrain, or open water ditching at speed. On a helicopter, maybe not so much. Plus the added weight, aerodynamic drag, and risk of accidental deployment. I think it would have to be a purpose-built design, like a "safe Robby" for the entry-level private owner with some bucks to spend (like Cirrus).

industry insider 13th Jan 2019 08:04

If it really works that well, its a bloody good idea on a single engine helicopter over "hostile" terrain.

Two's in 13th Jan 2019 16:27


Originally Posted by industry insider (Post 10359209)
If it really works that well, its a bloody good idea on a single engine helicopter over "hostile" terrain.

This is a well questioned path on this forum. To operate single-engined over "hostile" terrain requires a number of mitigations to be in place to reduce the risk in the event of an engine failure. Commercial or Military operators are very familiar with these, and again I would be fascinated in the data that shows an engine failure (or drive issue) at altitude that can't be managed with a correctly executed autorotation, including zero speed onto rugged terrain. The main risk mitigation for non-commercial operations should be not to operate over "hostile" terrain unless absolutely imperative.


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