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UH-1H missing from Coffs Harbour 6th Sept 2019

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UH-1H missing from Coffs Harbour 6th Sept 2019

Old 8th Sep 2019, 10:29
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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The iPad installation does seem odd to me. Hardly in keeping with the facade of an original war bird. The instruments that would be behind the iPad in the original no doubt would be expensive to maintain or replace now (were they self contained in the original UH-1 or remotely connected to Tarsyn's?). And are they armoured crew seats, or replica armoured seats? Looks like they're stuffed with pink batts and not steel plates. No N2/NR indicator or HSI on the co-pilot side, so it's not a full-on 2 pilot instrumented ship. Not something I'd choose to be stooging around in bad weather at night.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 10:59
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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It wouldn't be the first time that I haven't been able to see something right in front of me but where is the Heading Indicator on that panel?
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 11:05
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Captainplugwash

I agree. Being held outside the control zone at Willy is a common occurrence.
Was the zone active at the time? If an IFR planned aircraft was arriving at the same time it would have most likely resulted in the VFR being held OCTA.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 11:46
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Slightly different arrangement of the instrument panel, showing what looks to be an INOP VSI, in light of Huey Racer's comment. Not sure what is the most recent image.

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Old 8th Sep 2019, 12:13
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by zhishengji751 View Post
Slightly different arrangement of the instrument panel, showing what looks to be an INOP VSI, in light of Huey Racer's comment. Not sure what is the most recent image.
Theres another VSI on the far right.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 13:31
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Lots of variations to the Instrument Panel layouts but this is the Standard Panel that most old Hueys had in their Army Service.


https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Huey+Helic...%2FHuey-14.jpg


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Old 8th Sep 2019, 20:11
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Move the T&S up one sector and it becomes a standard Royal Air Force instrument panel.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 20:15
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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The iPad was probably just being used as a moving map. Very common in Utility aircraft down this end of the world.

No idea about the rest.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 21:23
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by SuperF View Post
The iPad was probably just being used as a moving map. Very common in Utility aircraft down this end of the world.

No idea about the rest.
I agree. All our machines have iPads on the dash now with moving map and our Cirro software.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 23:38
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by zhishengji751 View Post
Slightly different arrangement of the instrument panel, showing what looks to be an INOP VSI, in light of Huey Racer's comment. Not sure what is the most recent image.

Did the passengers read the warning message on the bottom left of the picture?
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 00:01
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Taking out an AH in any aircraft is playing with fire IMO. The Pilot of this aircraft may well have planned his trip to be conducted fully in day VMC. Un-forecast or un planned for head winds and before you know it you have a race with the sun. Failing light, blowing dust, gusty turbulent conditions and all of a sudden the AH is your best friend.

Everybody has been caught out at some stage.

No excuse for not landing and sitting it out but in so doing you are subject to an uncomfortable embarrassing night with your pissed off passengers.....There is a lot of pressure to keep going particularly when so close a place of comfort....in this case William Town.

Not saying that is what happened because I don’t know anymore than anyone else, but it sure doesn’t look to me like this helicopter should have been flying in the reported conditions.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 00:44
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Yep, wait it out in the Bell Hotel, done that a few times before. Nothing to be embarrassed about.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 01:27
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Part 132 of CASR sets out the requirements for limited category aircraft operations. It preserves the requirements under previous regulations (262AN and 262AM of the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988) but contains some important administrative and safety enhancements.

Overall, Part 132 sets out:
  • the conditions under which various limited category aircraft operations may be conducted
  • the responsibilities of persons involved in limited category aircraft operations
  • the offences that relate to breaching the conditions for limited category aircraft operations.
This Part provides flexibility and certainty around recreational use of warbirds and limited category historic or replica aircraft. It permits air racing and glider towing, and provides authorisation for personal flights. It also permits the limited category aircraft with any of the following to be eligible for a limited category certificate for personal flights (not adventure flights for payment or reward) as long as these are not conducted over populous areas:
  • unapproved major modifications
  • expired airframe fatigue life
  • life limited components that have exceeded their life limits.
Safety requirements include:
  • an extra safety briefing at the point of sale for any adventure flight as well as before boarding
  • limits to passenger numbers
  • conditions for flights over populous areas.
Good to see clear, unambiguous rules from CASA, no room for confusion there when compared with the FAA.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 01:40
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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It also permits the limited category aircraft with any of the following to be eligible for a limited category certificate for personal flights (not adventure flights for payment or reward) as long as these are not conducted over populous areas:
  • unapproved major modifications
  • expired airframe fatigue life
  • life limited components that have exceeded their life limits.
This is the really scary bit - flights can be approved in time-expired airframes with time-expired components and unapproved MAJOR modifications.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 02:43
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting point from a previous poster about North Sea Ops, compared to the winds on the night this happened.
At what wind speed would you consider not going flying in a UH-1H?
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 03:12
  #56 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by tartare View Post
Interesting point from a previous poster about North Sea Ops, compared to the winds on the night this happened.
At what wind speed would you consider not going flying in a UH-1H?
The shut down/start up limits were the main factor, but unexpected wind increases could catch us out and then we'd just have to keep flying until the wind dropped back down for a safe shut down. Brent Field Bell 212 ops we'd often catch 50kts+ winds, worst I had was ~80kts for an hour or two. Downwind was pretty darn quick but getting back into wind at 20-30kts groundspeed was tedious

However we had rotor brakes, whereas the UH1 VH-UVC hasn't/hadn't. This should be factored in to any trip to ensure a safe shut down (and start up) can be achieved without blade sailing and TRDS/boom/MRB damage.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 03:59
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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At what wind speed would you consider not going flying in a UH-1H?
That would depend upon whether it was 2 experienced IFR rated pilots in an IFR approved fit UH1H, or a private/low hour pilot that is/was relatively inexperienced in adverse condition operations.

Other factors would be whatís the urgency of the mission? Deliver your mates to Sydney?
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 06:50
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ascend Charlie View Post
This is the really scary bit - flights can be approved in time-expired airframes with time-expired components and unapproved MAJOR modifications.
Youíre reading that the wrong way in terms of the unapproved modifications.

As the manufacturers arenít likely to be around any more, a major modification might be a positive one, Ike a turbine replacing a radial.

It may be time expired in terms of what the manufacturer says, however as far as the industry, engineers and experts say, it may be fine.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 08:15
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Rumour has it the PIC was not night rated either.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 08:34
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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Itís not the wind speed I would be concerned with in teetering head helicopter but the gusts and severe turbulence.

Combine poor references and severe turbulence and a bad mast bumping event is a distinct possibility.

The age of the helicopter might be a factor in turning mast bumping into rotor separation.

It it would explain the sudden disappearance from radar.
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