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Morse code

Old 9th Apr 2019, 07:23
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Morse code

Has anyone here doing a VFR foreign licence conversion been required to do an examination on Morse code . The format of the exam being 30 letters codes being played once on a speaker at 1 letter every 2 seconds. No replay and no jotting down of the dits and dahs. Two allowed to be wrong. Or perhaps Iím just thick.
Interested what authorities around the world are requiring this.
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 10:05
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Oh dear, the dark ages. Tell em to get stuffed!
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 10:36
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I had dinner with an 80-year-old retired Air Canada Captain friend recently, who asked me if ham radio operators still used CW (our name for Morse). He noted that he could do Morse Code, but only three letters at a time!

However, Twin, it appears the dark ages are coming to light again:

https://www.engineering.com/Designer...unication.aspx

at least in the US Navy!
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 10:52
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show them, that the morse code to identify nav sources are printed the chart - and tell them, that they are repeated over and over again, so you can positively identify them even with interferences
And then show them a modern Glascockpit, where you can read on the display, wether you have selected the right nav source....
Testing morse code is not middle ages, that’s stoneage
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:09
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They make the rules. As far as they are concerned if you don't like them take a hike.
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:20
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Originally Posted by Flying Bull View Post
And then show them a modern Glascockpit, where you can read on the display, wether you have selected the right nav source....
And for those who'll never see a glass cockpit that intereprets it for them? How do they fare?
The logic is a bit like saying you don't need to know how to fly a raw data ILS as your glass cockpit has flight directors.
Rather a "Let them eat cake" solution,isn't it?
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:27
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Yes, I had to do it, but it was in the UK when exams were long hand written and it was all a bit RAF, in 1980 when a trim phone was the latest technology.
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:31
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Originally Posted by Flying Bull View Post
show them, that the morse code to identify nav sources are printed the chart - and tell them, that they are repeated over and over again, so you can positively identify them even with interferences
And then show them a modern Glascockpit, where you can read on the display, wether you have selected the right nav source....
Testing morse code is not middle ages, thatís stoneage
weíve tried all that
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:35
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Originally Posted by ve3id View Post
I had dinner with an 80-year-old retired Air Canada Captain friend recently, who asked me if ham radio operators still used CW (our name for Morse).
Here in Australia we carefully waited until the internet came along to distract any youngsters who might have been interested in ham radio before we dropped the CW requirement for HF licences. As a result it's probably even more of an old man's game than ever.

I did the full theory and regulations exams, giving me a "limited" VHF and up licence in about 1992, but damned if I was going to waste time, effort, and brain cells learning morse while I was flat out doing an engineering degree. Now my radio gear gathers dust in a box in the garage. (I found it while looking for something else this afternoon!)

I took a busload of students from the university ham club on a tour of the Melbourne Coastal Radio Station (marine radio for commercial shipping, closed 2002) in 1993; the staff were equal parts appalled and amused that amateur radio operators were still required to learn morse!
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:39
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Originally Posted by meleagertoo View Post
And for those who'll never see a glass cockpit that intereprets it for them? How do they fare?
The logic is a bit like saying you don't need to know how to fly a raw data ILS as your glass cockpit has flight directors.
Rather a "Let them eat cake" solution,isn't it?
Well, still, the Code is written in Letters - and point and dashes - in every approach chart/map.
All you have to identify is three or maximal four letters at a time, which are repeated constantly.
So if you want to check, do it like it would be in the real word.
Acceptance would be high and no time wasted for learning stone age tech.
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 11:43
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Unfortunately in their exam they are not repeated at all. In 10,000 hours of VFR flying , Iíve not once needed to ID a nav aid using its Morse identifiers
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 14:18
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Ahh those far off days. I well remember for months, studying for ground exams, playing cassette tapes of morse in the car. The exam itself, in a massive hall with dreadful acoustics, used a ghetto blaster. I seem to remember you were allowed three wrong answers so all was quiet until about the sixth group of letters, when those with more than three blanks slammed down their pencils and walked out.....

I always thought the morse code requirement, a bit like astro navigation, was an IQ test to ensure British pilots were a superior breed. Surely it wasnt because you needed to use it......
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 14:21
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When all of the Nav Charts and Instrument Approach Plates have the Identifier and Morse printed on the charts.....the absolute need to know Morse Code becomes a theoretical need and not one that applies to the Real World.

Just as The UK CAA demanded I know how a Cereal Bowl Compass worked.....though the only place one could find one was in a Museum or a Classic Aircraft.....I see a Pilot having to know Morse as being a bit outdated.

Seems whoever is insisting upon the exam as noted by the OP....needs to over haul its testing system.

Perhaps if this message was sent they might take notice.

..-. ..- -.-. -.- / -.-- --- ..-

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Old 9th Apr 2019, 14:45
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Originally Posted by SASless View Post
When all of the Nav Charts and Instrument Approach Plates have the Identifier and Morse printed on the charts.....the absolute need to know Morse Code becomes a theoretical need and not one that applies to the Real World.

Just as The UK CAA demanded I know how a Cereal Bowl Compass worked.....though the only place one could find one was in a Museum or a Classic Aircraft.....I see a Pilot having to know Morse as being a bit outdated.

Seems whoever is insisting upon the exam as noted by the OP....needs to over haul its testing system.

Perhaps if this message was sent they might take notice.
I honestly donít think theyíd have any clue to what it says
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 15:19
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Perhaps if this message was sent they might take notice.

Quote:
..-. ..- -.-. -.- / -.-- --- ..-
Now, now! Play nicely
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 16:45
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In a former life I was an AEoP on Nimrods and required to be able to send and receive morse code at 21 words per minute. It is not that difficult if you listen for the sound and do not try to break the letters in to dots and dashes.
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 18:15
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Originally Posted by Gordy View Post
In a former life I was an AEoP on Nimrods and required to be able to send and receive morse code at 21 words per minute. It is not that difficult if you listen for the sound and do not try to break the letters in to dots and dashes.
Yes - itís harder to read than listen to I think (not that I could ever claim 21 words per minute, but we had someone on my license course with the same background as you and he was exempted lessons, if not the CAA exam!)
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 18:35
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Why don't we bring back dunking people also to see if they are witches!!!!
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 19:05
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Ahh, the joys of the Friday night drive home from Yeovilton listening to elephants in straw hats, ten miles off, and other great Trent tunes
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Old 9th Apr 2019, 20:28
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When was morse removed from the CAA exams?
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