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EC 130 down at the Grand Canyon

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EC 130 down at the Grand Canyon

Old 13th Feb 2018, 18:42
  #41 (permalink)  
LRP
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Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2—Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of the Grand Canyon National Park, AZ

Section 1. Applicability. This rule prescribes special operating rules for all persons operating aircraft in the following airspace, designated as the Grand Canyon National Park Special Flight Rules Area:
That airspace extending upward from the surface up to but not including 14,500 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line beginning at lat. 36°0930 N., long. 114°0300 W.; northeast to lat. 36°1400 N., long. 113°0950 W.; thence northeast along the boundary of the Grand Canyon National Park to lat. 36°2447 N., long. 112°5200 W.; to lat. 36°3030 N., long. 112°3615 W. to lat. 36°2130 N., long. 112°0000 W. to lat. 36°3530 N., long. 111°5310 W., to lat. 36°5300 N., long. 111°3645 W. to lat. 36°5300 N., long. 111°3300 W.; to lat. 36°1900 N., long. 111°5050 W.; to lat. 36°1700 N., long. 111°4200 W.; to lat. 35°5930 N., long. 111°4200 W.; to lat. 35°5730 N., long. 112°0355 W.; thence counterclockwise via the 5 statute mile radius of the Grand Canyon Airport airport reference point (lat. 35°5709 N., long. 112°0847 W.) to lat. 35°5730 N., long. 112°1400 W.; to lat. 35°5730 N., long. 113°1100 W.; to lat. 35°4230 N., long. 113°1100 W.; to 35°3830 N.; long. 113°2730 W.; thence counterclockwise via the 5 statute mile radius of the Peach Springs VORTAC to lat. 35°4120 N., long. 113°3600 W.; to lat. 35°5525 N., long. 113°4910 W.; to lat. 35°5745 N., 113°4520 W.; thence northwest along the park boundary to lat. 36°0220 N., long. 113°5015 W.; to 36°0010 N., long. 113°5345 W.; thence to the point of beginning.
Section 3. Aircraft operations: general. Except in an emergency, no person may operate an aircraft in the Special Flight Rules, Area under VFR on or after September 22, 1988, or under IFR on or after April 6, 1989, unless the operation—(a) Is conducted in accordance with the following procedures:
Note: The following procedures do not relieve the pilot from see-and-avoid responsibility or compliance with FAR 91.119.
(1) Unless necessary to maintain a safe distance from other aircraft or terrain—
(i) Remain clear of the areas described in Section 4; and
(ii) Remain at or above the following altitudes in each sector of the canyon:
Eastern section from Lees Ferry to North Canyon and North Canyon to Boundary Ridge: as prescribed in Section 5.
Boundary Ridge to Supai Point (Yumtheska Point): 10,000 feet MSL.
Western section from Diamond Creek to the Grant Wash Cliffs: 8,000 feet MSL.
(2) Proceed through the four flight corridors describe in Section 4 at the following altitudes unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Flight Standards District Office:
Northbound

11,500 or
13,500 feet MSL
Southbound

>10,500 or
>12,500 feet MSL
(b) Is authorized in writing by the Flight Standards District Office and is conducted in compliance with the conditions contained in that authorization. Normally authorization will be granted for operation in the areas described in Section 4 or below the altitudes listed in Section 5 only for operations of aircraft necessary for law enforcement, firefighting, emergency medical treatment/evacuation of persons in the vicinity of the Park; for support of Park maintenance or activities; or for aerial access to and maintenance of other property located within the Special Flight Rules Area. Authorization may be issued on a continuing basis.
(c)(1) Prior to November 1, 1988, is conducted in accordance with a specific authorization to operate in that airspace incorporated in the operator's part 135 operations specifications in accordance with the provisions of SFAR 50-1, notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 4 and 5; and
(2) On or after November 1, 1988, is conducted in accordance with a specific authorization to operate in that airspace incorporated in the operated in the operator's operations specifications and approved by the Flight Standards District Office in accordance with the provisions of SFAR 50-2.
(d) Is a search and rescue mission directed by the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.
(e) Is conducted within 3 nautical miles of Whitmore Airstrip, Pearce Ferry Airstrip, North Rim Airstrip, Cliff Dwellers Airstrip, or Marble Canyon Airstrip at an altitudes less than 3,000 feet above airport elevation, for the purpose of landing at or taking off from that facility. Or
(f) Is conducted under an IFR clearance and the pilot is acting in accordance with ATC instructions. An IFR flight plan may not be filed on a route or at an altitude that would require operation in an area described in Section 4.
Section 4. Flight-free zones. Except in an emergency or if otherwise necessary for safety of flight, or unless otherwise authorized by the Flight Standards District Office for a purpose listed in Section 3(b), no person may operate an aircraft in the Special Flight Rules Area within the following areas:
(a) Desert View Flight-Free Zone. Within an area bounded by a line beginning at Lat. 35°5930 N., Long. 111°4620 W. to 35°5930 N., Long. 111°5245 W.; to Lat. 36°0450 N., Long. 111°5200 W.; to Lat. 36°0600 N., Long. 111°4620 W.; to the point of origin; but not including the airspace at and above 10,500 feet MSL within 1 mile of the western boundary of the zone. The area between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-Free Zones is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.”
(b) Bright Angel Flight-Free Zone. Within an area bounded by a line beginning at Lat. 35°5930 N., Long. 111°5530 W.; to Lat. 35°5930 N., Long. 112°0400 W.; thence counterclockwise via the 5 statute mile radius of the Grand Canyon Airport point (Lat. 35°5709 N., Long. 112°0847 W.) to Lat. 36°0130 N., Long. 112°1100 W.; to Lat. 36°0615 N., Long. 112°1250 W.; to Lat. 36°1440 N., Long. 112°0850 W.; to Lat. 36°1440 N., Long. 111°5730 W.; to Lat. 36°1230 N., Long. 111°5350 W.; to the point of origin; but not including the airspace at and above 10,500 feet MSL within 1 mile of the eastern boundary between the southern boundary and Lat. 36°0450 N. or the airspace at and above 10,500 feet MSL within 2 miles of the northwest boundary. The area bounded by the Bright Angel and Shinumo Flight-Free Zones is designated the “Dragon Corridor.”
(c) Shinumo Flight-Free Zone. Within an area bounded by a line beginning at Lat. 36°0400 N., Long. 112°1640 W.; northwest along the park boundary to a point at Lat. 36°1247 N., Long. 112°3053 W.; to Lat. 36°2115 N., Long. 112°2020 W.; east along the park boundary to Lat. 36°2115 N., Long. 112°1355 W.; to Lat. 36°1440 N., Long. 112°1125 W.; to the point of origin. The area between the Thunder River/Toroweap and Shinumo Flight Free Zones is designated the “Fossil Canyon Corridor.”
(d) Toroweap/Thunder River Flight-Free Zone. Within an area bounded by a line beginning at Lat. 36°2245 N., Long. 112°2035 W.; thence northwest along the boundary of the Grand Canyon National Park to Lat. 36°1748 N., Long. 113°0315 W.; to Lat. 36°1500 N., Long. 113°0710 W.; to Lat. 36°1030 N., Long. 113°0710 W.; thence east along the Colorado River to the confluence of Havasu Canyon (Lat. 36°1840 N., Long. 112°4545 W. including that area within a 1.5 nautical mile radius of Toroweap Overlook (Lat. 36°1245 N., Long. 113°0330 W.); to the point of origin; but not including the following airspace designated as the “Tuckup Corridor”: at or above 10,500 feet MSL within 2 nautical miles either side of a line extending between Lat. 36°2447 N., Long. 112°4850 W. and Lat. 36°1710 N., Long. 112°4850 W.; to the point of origin.
Section 5. Minimum flight altitudes. Except in an emergency or if otherwise necessary for safety of flight, or unless otherwise authorized by the Flight Standards District Office for a purpose listed in Section 3(b), no person may operate an aircraft in the Special Flight Rules Area at an altitude lower than the following:
(a) Eastern section from Lees Ferry to North Canyon: 5,000 feet MSL.
(b) Eastern section from North Canyon to Boundary Ridge: 6,000 feet MSL.
(c) Boundary Ridge to Supai (Yumtheska) Point: 7,500 feet MSL.
(d) Supai Point to Diamond Creek: 6,500 feet MSL.
(e) Western section from Diamond Creek to the Grand Wash Cliffs: 5,000 feet MSL.
Section 9. Termination date. Section 1. Applicability, Section 4, Flight-free zones, and Section 5. Minimum flight altitudes, expire on April 19, 2001.
Note: [Removed]
[66 FR 1003, Jan. 4, 2001, as amended at 66 FR 16584, Mar. 26, 2001; 72 FR 9846, Mar. 6, 2007]




This all came about as a response to a mid-air in June 1986 between a tour B206 and a tour Twin Otter. I pulled some of the bodies out.



Prior to that it was the wild west for Canyon tours.


Don't know of any restrictions reference "rescue before dark".
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Old 13th Feb 2018, 20:53
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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sunset time

FYI/ FWIW
According to the US Naval Observatory website, sunset in that area on Feb. 10 was at 1814. The crash reportedly happened at around 1720, so there was about an hour and a half of daylight/ twilight left for the rescue operations before things got really dark.
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 03:04
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
So, as rotorspeed says - it is a surprise that they operate so late that any rescue can't be completed in daylight.


I'm sure the FAA will have a new rule to cover that situation.
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 04:52
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tigerfish View Post
Durban, I'm getting a bit rusty now on my Eurocopter's, but your picture looks more like the smaller EC120, than the EC130. Difficult because the image is a bit small.

TF
No, EC130. I flew in it and I know the difference.
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Old 15th Feb 2018, 08:57
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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NTSB Press conference video;

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Old 16th Feb 2018, 21:10
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It didnt crash because of a regulation.
So any guesses what happened?
This is PPRuNe after all.
My guess: Donk stopped inside the dead mans curve......
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Old 16th Feb 2018, 22:06
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Thomas coupling View Post
..My guess: Donk stopped inside the dead mans curve......
Pretty big dead mans curve over that terrain in a single engine helicopter.
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Old 16th Feb 2018, 23:45
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What?
What's that got to do with dead mans curve?
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 00:02
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He means it's unforgiving terrain in which to pull off a successful auto, as in, the same as going into tall timber.
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 01:19
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by megan View Post
He means it's unforgiving terrain in which to pull off a successful auto, as in, the same as going into tall timber.
Correct (YODA KNOWS ALL).
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 10:46
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by megan View Post
He means it's unforgiving terrain in which to pull off a successful auto, as in, the same as going into tall timber.
At any normal tour altitude you would never be in the avoid side of the HV diagram. If it was just an engine out, there would have been plenty of time to autorotate to an acceptable spot for a zero speed landing.

Worst thing would be then rolling to its side. Which of course could theoretically start the fire we have seen.

I can’t see why it would be similar to autorotating into tall timber.
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 11:07
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Exactly.
I'm curious, does the FAA clear tour operators to loiter inside the curve in a single?
If not, then a donk stop would indeed be more forgiving in that the availability to choose your LZ would increase.
The pictures suggest that once committed, the hostile terrain would exacerbate a roll over etc.
Interesting to hear from a tour pilot in this area and what their rules are regarding hostile terrain?
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 11:35
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Hot and Hi View Post
At any normal tour altitude you would never be in the avoid side of the HV diagram. If it was just an engine out, there would have been plenty of time to autorotate to an acceptable spot for a zero speed landing...
In the photos of the accident site vicinity I don't see any suitable ground for a zero speed landing...it all looks hostile to me...and would you really be intending to do a zero speed landing in (what I assume to be) a heavy aircraft with 6 POB?
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 12:05
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In the photos of the accident site vicinity I don't see any suitable ground for a zero speed landing...it all looks hostile to me..and would you really be intending to do a zero speed landing in (what I assume to be) a heavy aircraft with 6 POB?
What is suitable ground for a zero speed landing? Surely hostile ground is more likely to require a zero speed landing? If there is no chance for a run on then a hard flare and a vertical drop would be the lesser of the two evils No?
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 12:31
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Originally Posted by chopjock View Post
What is suitable ground for a zero speed landing?
Level. In to wind. Obstacle free.
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 12:33
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Originally Posted by Thomas coupling View Post
I'm curious, does the FAA clear tour operators to loiter inside the curve in a single?
136.13 Helicopter performance plan and operations.
(a) Each operator must complete a performance plan before each helicopter commercial air tour, or flight operated under 14 CFR 91.146 or 91.147. The pilot in command must review for accuracy and comply with the performance plan on the day the flight is flown. The performance plan must be based on the information in the Rotorcraft Flight Manual (RFM) for that helicopter, taking into consideration the maximum density altitude for which the operation is planned, in order to determine:

(1) Maximum gross weight and center of gravity (CG) limitations for hovering in ground effect;

(2) Maximum gross weight and CG limitations for hovering out of ground effect; and

(3) Maximum combination of weight, altitude, and temperature for which height/velocity information in the RFM is valid.

(b) Except for the approach to and transition from a hover for the purpose of takeoff and landing, or during takeoff and landing, the pilot in command must make a reasonable plan to operate the helicopter outside of the caution/warning/avoid area of the limiting height/velocity diagram.

(c) Except for the approach to and transition from a hover for the purpose of takeoff and landing, during takeoff and landing, or when necessary for safety of flight, the pilot in command must operate the helicopter in compliance with the plan described in paragraph (b) of this section.
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 12:44
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So, since this operator has special dispensation to land in the Canyon, do we think this crash occurred on approach or departure from the LS.
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 12:47
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guille
Level. In to wind. Obstacle free.
More likely applies to a long run on...
If you have obstacles, a run on is to be avoided, surely? Therefore if obstacles are in the way of a run on, then a zero speed would be the preferred option?
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 13:34
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I think it’s pretty obvious that a zero speed ( or v slow speed) auto is the only one available over rocky ground like that . The important thing is to stay upright which would be almost impossible doing a run on over boulders ! Would be interested to learn if anyone thinks differently.
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Old 17th Feb 2018, 15:40
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The terrain in the pictures dictates a zero airspeed touchdown. Not sure why some on here get that confused.
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