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SAR: Search & Rescue Ops [Archive Copy]

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SAR: Search & Rescue Ops [Archive Copy]

Old 13th Jan 2006, 20:33
  #661 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: UK
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Thumbs down Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

S T
Is your information from the Agusta website?
I think the comments we have already seen is that the AB 139 is not living up to the marketing hype (Agusta website) - ie the website is wrong.
Does anybody know the facts? How about the CHC AB 139s in Den Helder what is their weight? Come on speak up AB 139 pilots or be forever damned!
RI
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Old 14th Jan 2006, 01:51
  #662 (permalink)  
 
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Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

ST, yes I think we can safely say that the MCGA will want to go rather further than the Isle of Wight! I'm no authority on the workings of UK SAR, but at the very least I'd have thought they would cover all of the UK territorial waters. The next base going East is RAF Wattisham, so that gives some clue as to how far SE the Lee on Solent machine needs to cover.

Out of interest, what's the deal with the Channel Islands; is that Portland's coverage or the French?
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Old 14th Jan 2006, 15:16
  #663 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

Bit of both really.

Portland can and has covered it though it's well over the french side.
Depends on the type and seriousness of the incident, as well as who is coordinating it and which aircraft is more readily available.
They have got their own fixed wing SAR aircraft as well as their own lifeboats which they task themselves.

Assuming the SAR 139 has doors either side, is there any worth in having a hoist either side?
A laymans thinking would be that it would help balance the aircraft and gain a little flexibility in which side you winch from.
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Old 15th Jan 2006, 16:22
  #664 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2004
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Thumbs down Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

DanglyBob
Would you need an AMC on each side then? Also how would you do a winch changeover with someone on the wire?
So, nobody prepared to defend the AB 139...so the rumours about lack of payload and range must be true!
RI
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Old 15th Jan 2006, 16:39
  #665 (permalink)  
 
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Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

Or perhaps they can't be bothered to post to someone who from previous posts has obviously made up their mind.
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Old 15th Jan 2006, 21:18
  #666 (permalink)  
 
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Red face Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

Running in you crack me up!

Come on speak up AB 139 pilots or be forever damned!

So, nobody prepared to defend the AB 139...so the rumours about lack of payload and range must be true!
Some sort of logic that is! What planet are you on? (island might be more appropriate....)

I think most people in this forum with an interest in SAR have long realized that you are not here to have a discussion but to make a statement (or grind an axe as they say). Shame really because you do have some valid points.
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Old 16th Jan 2006, 06:44
  #667 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2004
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Cool Re: UK Coastguard SAR - Bristow out??

Sandy Toad and Woolf,
There are a number of rumours (Nightwatchman & Fuel2noise) that the range and payload of the AB 139 is not all that its cracked up to be. If they are true, then the Ab 139 will be worse than the S61, is this progress?
It takes two to have a discussion and so far nobody is prepared to defend the AB 139, so we can't have a discussion.
RI
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Old 26th Jan 2006, 19:32
  #668 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: lancashire
Age: 49
Posts: 138
SAR Question

Just been watching Seaside Rescue ( I know)
But as the winchman leaves the helicopter, he removes a pin from the hook, I was just woundering if somebody out there can tell me what is the purpose of the pin?
Thanks.
ON21
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Old 26th Jan 2006, 19:54
  #669 (permalink)  
 
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It stops the hook from opening (and the winchman falling off the hook) if the hook gets knocked as the winchman leaves the aircraft. He removes the pin once clear of the aircraft so he can quickly release himself from the hook when he lands on the boat.
Best wishes
SiClick
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Old 26th Jan 2006, 20:02
  #670 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
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Thanks for your response, I can sleep tonight!
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Old 26th Jan 2006, 20:13
  #671 (permalink)  
 
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And thanks from me. I was watching it too, and thought exactly the same: "why's he do that?"
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Old 31st Jan 2006, 19:59
  #672 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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Well done to all involved in this morning's copybook rescue:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/eur...ey/4664564.stm

There have been questions asked on this thread about the AB139 capability as a SAR helicopter, especially its size and payload. Does anyone know if it could have done this job and picked up 12 at that range?
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Old 31st Jan 2006, 20:56
  #673 (permalink)  
 
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The BBC Report map seems to suggest that the helicopter came from Portland, but it did (as the text suggests) come from Lee on Solent, at the top right of the map, underneath the UK overview. Thats about 100nm's, and I guess answers the question raised above over who's responsibility it is to cover the Channel Islands.

I'm sure the AB139 would make the distance OK, and probably about 15 mins quicker than the S-61, but I can't see it carrying 12 casualties. Can't remember the record for the back of a 61, but I know they got in a hell of a lot once !

The channel is still one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world, with several cargo ships having come together in the past few years. It is also one of the busiest passenger ferry routes (although that may be a pre Channel Tunnel statistic) so hopefully this incident will make HMCG have a quick think about the type of aircraft they want to use on the south coast.
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Old 31st Jan 2006, 21:30
  #674 (permalink)  
 
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special 25

I take it that from your post that you are not very good at geography, you obviously thought the Start point indicator arrow was the start position of the rescue....... unfortunatley for you that is a place called start point, not far from Dartmouth in Devon, have a look at a map of the area. It has a namesake in the Orkney islands also start point
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Old 1st Feb 2006, 06:43
  #675 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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Question

Angel on the wire

I think you win the prize for this weeks most irrelevant post!


Special 25, I agree that it is a busy area, is the A139 the right aircraft or would something bigger like the S92 be better?
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Old 1st Feb 2006, 07:12
  #676 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
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Originally posted by Dillon the dog
Angel on the wire
I think you win the prize for this weeks most irrelevant post!
Far from being irrelevant, Angel has given a factual geography lesson to the uninitiated.

Now then, my post has probably taken over the prize for irrelevance!!
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Old 1st Feb 2006, 08:15
  #677 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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I see that "angelonawire" has decided to raise his head above the parapets again and continues with his extraordinary style of being rude to people. While the point is made, it could have been done in a more polite fashion.

However, back to the point. Rumour has it that the concept of using a smaller helicopter was based on the "fact" that the average number of persons rescued per SAR callout was two, therefore a bigger helicopter was not needed. A strange basis to work on when you have one of the busiest shipping areas in the world. There have been numerous cases of large ships in trouble in the Channel over the years. While there may not be the need to rescue large numbers every callout, surely, for this area, a suitably sized helicopter such as the S-92 should be in place to cover for this eventuality? After all, it is not exactly a rare occurrence.

I understand that MCA Helicopters have a task to move fire crews and equipment to vessels on fire in the Channel. Was this considered by the Government team that looked in to the new SAR contracts? It seems a strange choice of aircraft if that task is to be continued. However, more flying hours for the crews I suppose, one flight out to take the team and then the next to bring out their equipment!

I would really like to understand why the team thought the AB139 was a suitable choice for the South Coast.
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Old 1st Feb 2006, 08:36
  #678 (permalink)  
 
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Having flown both the Wessex and Seaking in the SAR role I can see nothing wrong with the decision to have a mixed fleet. During my time I never had a situation where I could not carry all the survivors I was presented with and can only think of one where the Seaking was fully laden and that was off Ireland.

There is a need, however, to make sure that the mix is based evenly around the country and in a way that it is mutually supporting. The recent incident had both the HMCG S61N and Chivenor's Seaking in attendance.

Don't forget is wasn't that long ago when the UK SAR fleet was a mix of Seakings and Whirlwinds and there weren't any cases of lack of lifting capacity for over water rescues that I can recall. The 139 is a quantum leap above the Whirlwind in both carrying and all weather ability

HF
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Old 1st Feb 2006, 09:36
  #679 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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The 139 is a quantum leap above the Whirlwind in both carrying and all weather ability
Very true Hummingfrog, but is it a quantum leap over a S-61/Sea King that it is replacing? I don't think so. The larger cabin size has had its advantages in many SAR operation even if only a single stretcher case. There is space for the winchman/doctor/medic to work on the casualty. While the AB139 may have nice toys for the pilots, it does nothing for the guys who have to work in the cabin. They will have to move from a spacious working place to a very cramped one. I believe the 412 crewmen in Cyprus are already having complaints about bad backs and knees due to the cramped conditions they have to work in.

Couple that with twin hoists, a FLIR (and console in an already small cabin area) and possibly a skyshout system, plus the SAR medical and winching kits which are of necessity these days especially with the medical qualifications crewmen have (more so than in your Whirlwind days), then the ZFM of the aircraft will be high. What will that leave as disposable load?

Perhaps we will be back to Whirlwind lifting capabilities at Whirlwind Radius of Action (what was it 90nm and a capability of lifting about 3-4 people at that range? - never flew it so only guessing).
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Old 1st Feb 2006, 18:07
  #680 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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Hummingfrog,

I agree that the A139 is a step up from the Whirlwind, ie a single engine helicopter with limited range and speed, basically day VFR for SAR. However, I think there were capacity problems, for example during the Fastnet Race disaster where the Sea Kings ran out of capacity to rescue all those that needed help and the Whirlwinds lacked the range to do much. But nostalgia isn't what it used to be!

A mixed fleet might be sensible providing the types are mutually supporting, for example a S61/S92 at Lee on Solent and a daylight only A139 at Portland. To lump all your eggs into one basket by having the only SAR coverage between Wattisham and Culdrose, responsible for one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world, based on small, as yet unproven, helicopters with possibly a limited payload is a surprising and some might save brave choice. As Jknife points out, with all the kit a modern SAR helicopter has to carry there will not be much space or payload left in the A139.
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