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What's New In W. Africa (Nigeria)

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What's New In W. Africa (Nigeria)

Old 2nd Jun 2006, 17:44
  #801 (permalink)  
 
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Ever wonder what the inside of a Nigerian prison looks like?
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Old 3rd Jun 2006, 17:10
  #802 (permalink)  
 
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Thumbs down

It seems that the attack on the Bulford Dolphin actually ended with the kidnapping of 16 workers, 8 expats and 8 Nigerians. According to news reports, the kidnappers have said they are prepared to negotiate for money for the release of the hostages. News of the abductions has caused the price of oil to rise by another $2 a barrel.
OBSLF
Many of the oil facilities are indeed protected by professional security - the Nigerian Army and Navy, plus many MOPOL of the Nigerian Police Force. However, the new brand of militants carrying out these attacks are usually in greater numbers than the military protecting an installation, and the Nigerian military and police are notoriously unreliable in their determination to actually carry out the job of protecting the facilities. The attackers of late, have also had considerably greater firepower, in terms of numbers and quality and calibre of weapons, than those defending oil bases. The attack at Benisede earlier in the year is one such example. Also the kidnapping of the workers from the Wilbros rig, was carried out by a large number of men, using 'swarm attack' tactics. In the robbery at the Agip Base in Port Harcourt earlier this year, the mobile police on site were considerably outnumbered and slaughtered in a crossfire by attackers actually using a modicum of tactical skill. The new breed of militant is considerably better armed, more determined and better trained than before, whilst the Nigerian military and paramilitary forces suffer from low morale, poor training, poor discipline, and inferior weapons. Until that changes and the government is seriously prepared to act decisively and get a political and military grip of the situation, it will probably get worse as the attackers become emblodened by their continuing successes and seeming invulnerability
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Old 3rd Jun 2006, 17:39
  #803 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tokunbo
It seems that the attack on the Bulford Dolphin actually ended with the kidnapping of 16 workers, 8 expats and 8 Nigerians. According to news reports, the kidnappers have said they are prepared to negotiate for money for the release of the hostages. News of the abductions has caused the price of oil to rise by another $2 a barrel.
OBSLF
Many of the oil facilities are indeed protected by professional security - the Nigerian Army and Navy, plus many MOPOL of the Nigerian Police Force. However, the new brand of militants carrying out these attacks are usually in greater numbers than the military protecting an installation, and the Nigerian military and police are notoriously unreliable in their determination to actually carry out the job of protecting the facilities. The attackers of late, have also had considerably greater firepower, in terms of numbers and quality and calibre of weapons, than those defending oil bases. The attack at Benisede earlier in the year is one such example. Also the kidnapping of the workers from the Wilbros rig, was carried out by a large number of men, using 'swarm attack' tactics. In the robbery at the Agip Base in Port Harcourt earlier this year, the mobile police on site were considerably outnumbered and slaughtered in a crossfire by attackers actually using a modicum of tactical skill. The new breed of militant is considerably better armed, more determined and better trained than before, whilst the Nigerian military and paramilitary forces suffer from low morale, poor training, poor discipline, and inferior weapons. Until that changes and the government is seriously prepared to act decisively and get a political and military grip of the situation, it will probably get worse as the attackers become emblodened by their continuing successes and seeming invulnerability
No offense intended, but i'm afriad u've got a few things wrong.Yes, the militants are getting more sophisticated, and yes,the military still needs more logistics to patrol the swamps.But i TOTALLY disagree with u when u said that our country's military lacks proper training,discipline, and use inferior weapons.i've worked with these fine men and women.Do you have any idea what it takes to pass thru their training?And please what do u know about the weapons they use? Aren't u aware that there has also been successes against MEND,although they're now pushing for a political solutions to the Niger-Delta crisis.So pls,with all due respect,b4 you paint our country's military black in front of this international forum(that's if at all you are a Nigerian),pleease get your facts right.
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Old 3rd Jun 2006, 22:23
  #804 (permalink)  
 
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Many of the oil facilities are indeed protected by professional security - the Nigerian Army and Navy, plus many MOPOL of the Nigerian Police Force.
Depends upon your definition of "professional"
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Old 3rd Jun 2006, 23:11
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centurion,
Yes, on balance, you're right, as the army are now receiving a lot more training aid and weapons from the USA (itself the cause of concern for a number of international commentators). However, the attacks on Odi and in Benue State still cast doubt on the overall discipline of the army.
I also agree that they need much better logistic support for operations in the Delta area - the lack of patrol boats needs to be addressed urgently as it's impractical to think that it would be possible to have adequate military protection on all the oil installations in the Delta region. At then end of the day this conflict, as with most others, needs to be resolved politically and al the military can do is to try and stop outright war erupting while the government and political factions of the region come to a workable solution to end it.
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Old 4th Jun 2006, 13:41
  #806 (permalink)  
 
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Thumbs up Foreign Workers released

The BBC are reporting that all 8 foreign workers who were abducted on Friday have now been released:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/5045520.stm
The article says nothing about the Nigerian workers who were also taken captive, but Ihope that they have also been released unharmed.
There have been a number of news releases as there was some confusion earlier as to whether just the 2 Britons had been released, but the BBC one is the same as the latest Washington Post news.
It seems that MEND have denied any involvement this time, saying that the kidnappings were purely a money making scheme.

Last edited by Mama Mangrove; 4th Jun 2006 at 13:52.
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Old 4th Jun 2006, 17:30
  #807 (permalink)  
 
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All are safe and well

Just been Skypeing a colleague down there:

The 8 expats have been picked up by helicopter this afternoon from the Governorís house at Yenagoa and flown to PHC where they will be flown to Abuja. All are well and unharmed. Appears this attack was as a result of Peak, the company operating the Bulford Dolphin, who had not paid the local community a promised amount for their activities offshore. This time not a MEND act.
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Old 4th Jun 2006, 20:46
  #808 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tokunbo
Many of the oil facilities are indeed protected by professional security - the Nigerian Army and Navy, plus many MOPOL of the Nigerian Police Force.
Ahh...well that's OK then...we can rest easy.

NC43
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Old 7th Jun 2006, 08:39
  #809 (permalink)  
 
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Security problems in the Niger Delta? Here come the Americans:
Nigeria hires US firm to secure oil installations
Sources close to the company said that officials of the American company had arrived Nigeria to fine tune the proposals to be submitted to government.
...the American company, whose identity could not be disclosed for security reasons, would employ the integrated smart sensors and pipeline management systems which are the first and only one of its kinds in the world.
The devices will monitor, detect and prevent the frequent vandalisation of oil pipelines and the destruction of oil installations across the country.
...the technology is capable of intruder detection and prevention...
The equipment are to be installed in strategic places to enable mobile operators and security agents in vehicles and offices to monitor, detect and recognise events, activities and movement of persons and vehicles within a distance of one kilometre on both sides of an oil installation with the aid of full motion video.
...infra-red cameras which would be installed at every 1km to 5km to cover the network of the 5 000km NNPC pipelines, cost between US$3 000 and US$20 000 each depending on the quality and range.
...the project when completed would be managed by one of Nigeria s leading indigenous oil service company and communication giant. .
Analysts say that the technology will be a landmark development in Nigeria s oil and gas industry as it will curtail the incessant vandalisation of oil pipelines and destruction of oil installations which have led to the loss of several lives and billions of dollars of oil revenue.
"..detect and prevent...first and only one in the world...enable mobile operators and security agents in vehicles?"
Have these guys ever had a close look at the terrain and are they aware just what the problems are about? It will require half of the nations security agencies to enable installation of such equipment...and the other half to protect it once in place.
This must surely be America's answer to the Nigerian 419 scam!
Back to the real world: In the early hours of today the Shell installation at Cawthorne Channel was attacked, possible fatalities amongst the Mopol on site, plus the abduction of 5 expatriates (Koreans?).
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Old 7th Jun 2006, 13:20
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Doctor, it's those flashbacks again...

Anyone who had the luck to be able to follow the developments in the Viet Nam War (or whatever it was supposed to be called) must remember the way things ramped up from raggedy peasants running around using bamboo spears and bolt-action rifles to a full-scale war, albeit one still sold to the general public as raggedy peasants, etc.

Meanwhile the corrupt regime in Saigon just seemed to be not too bothered by the rather inevitable and looming end.

Here we go again, eh?

I remember chatting with one Niger Delta abductee who told me his captors passed their time, 'smoking ganja, wrestling with each other and cleaning their weapons.' I didn't mind the first two but that last one sounded a bit worrisome. Not to diss whatever professionalism is on display from the various Nigerian security forces but most of their weapons I saw were filthy!

On a larger scale, one couldn't miss the fleets of junked helos and half-sunken patrol boats. Too, the way that C-130 went in just a few miles after take-off didn't inspire much confidence. While individuals may be fine soldiers, sailors and airmen, the military as a whole doesn't seem to be well-led or supported. Good for stomping some mud-hut village flat but for a serious fight? Hmm...

I don't think there are any magic gizmos that can sort this one out.
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Old 7th Jun 2006, 13:54
  #811 (permalink)  
 
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Well why not have a pipeline defense system using hi-tech gizmo's?

Nigeria has a "Space Agency" for lofting kit into the stars do they not?

Just another way to "legally" siphon off beau coup Dollars into some pockets!
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Old 7th Jun 2006, 15:35
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As to high-tech solutions to grass-roots problems, I was chatting with a retired Air Force guy not long ago.

He had been a navigator on an AC-130 squadron that was attempting to preserve law and order by blasting the road traffic on the Ho Chi Minh Trail. He and his Aircraft Commander got orders for R&R, even though they wanted to go as a complete crew. While he was on leave the bad guys/good guys (choose one) traded in their bamboo spears on SAM missiles and blew his AC-130 right out of the sky! Up to that point we had been rather smug about having the upper hand, technology-wise.

It looks to me as though events in the Delta are following a similar arc to the war in Viet Nam. For whatever reason the locals are anti-government, with not much being done on the 'hearts and minds' front, even if that were seriously do-able. What passes for a military solution just looks like random applications of violence. Will the next stage be moving to a sort of 'Strategic Hamlet' coupled with a 'Free-Fire Zone' strategy? That would be to say, either live under control or else expect to be fair game. That would be the logical next step, not that it would be a good idea.

It would be interesting to see some American military advisors coming in to try and re-fight Viet Nam in Nigeria. For profit, of course! Hey, they could get lucky and win, and if they lose, well... how much worse a mess could they make of things? As hinted at by my esteemed colleague SASless, if there's a way to sign a contract and make a quick 10% then stand by for an announcement about this coming soon.

What the heck, maybe they could finish putting all those Schweizer 300's together, find some Avgas to run them on and go do some aerial reconaissance? Nah, that's what 'they' would expect them to do. Better to just use this crisis to buy something new, shiny and expensive that should sort all the problems out as if by ju-ju. There must be a warehouse somewhere in California stuffed full of Robert Strange McNamara Commemorative Model Bad Guy Detectors built into life-like replicas of tropical fruit.

'Tell Friday to go back to the market with this pineapple. It is beeping!'
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Old 7th Jun 2006, 16:31
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Chuks,

What was it....22,000,000 USD for spare parts for the Police Air Wing one year...and no flyable aircraft to assist in the rescue/recovery ops at the C-130 crash scene near Lagos? The work was then done by Bristow with a 212.
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Old 7th Jun 2006, 23:55
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Thumbs down CHRONOLOGY-militants' attacks on oil, gas industries

It seem the militants is out killing soldiers and kidnapping of expatriates again. In answer to the government refusal to free Dokubo Asari on the grounds he is a threat to national securite. This were published on the www.oyibosonline.com website yesterday:

CHRONOLOGY-militants' attacks on oil, gas industries

Militants attacked a natural gas plant operated by Royal Dutch Shell in Nigeria's southern delta on Wednesday, killing at least four soldiers and kidnapping five South Korean contractors.

The Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), which launched a series of attacks earlier this year that forced the closure of a quarter of Nigerian oil output, threatened strikes on crucial oil facilities in the next few weeks.

Following is a chronology of some major attacks on the Nigerian oil industry in 2006.

-- Jan. 10 - Militants kidnap four oil workers at gunpoint from Shell's offshore E.A. oilfield. Shell shuts 115,000 bpd E.A. platform.

-- Militants also blow up major crude oil pipeline, cutting supplies to Forcados export terminal by 100,000 bpd.

-- Jan. 30 - Militants free the four hostages but threaten a new wave of attacks.

-- Feb. 18 - Militants in speedboats storm a barge operated by U.S. oil services company Willbros and abduct nine workers.

They also blow up a Shell crude oil pipeline and a gas pipeline operated by state-run Nigerian National Petroleum Corp., and bomb Shell's Forcados tanker loading platform, forcing the firm to suspend exports from the 380,000 bpd facility. Closure of Forcados impacts other companies, cutting a further 100,000 bpd output. Shell shuts 115,000 bpd E.A. platform as precaution.

-- March 1 - Militants release six of the hostages: one American, two Egyptians, two Thais and a Filipino.

-- March 18 - Attackers blow up oil pipeline operated by Italian company Agip, shutting down 75,000 bpd. MEND says it was not involved.

-- March 27 - Militants release remaining three hostages, two Americans and a Briton.

-- May 10 - A U.S. oil executive employed by Baker Hughes is killed in an apparently targeted attack in Port Harcourt.

-- May 11 - An Italian is among three workers, employees of Italian oil contractor Saipem who are kidnapped from a car.

-- June 2 - Six Britons, one Canadian and one U.S. citizen are abducted from the Bulford Dolphin oil rig about 40 miles off the coast of southern Nigeria overnight. The exploration rig is owned by Norwegian oilfield services group Fred. Olsen Energy. They are released two days later.

-- June 7 - Militants attack a Shell-operated natural gas facility in the Niger Delta, killing at least five soldiers and kidnapping five South Korean contractors. MEND says Koreans will be freed in exchange for a militia leader on trial for treason and denied bail by a Nigerian court.
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Old 8th Jun 2006, 08:48
  #815 (permalink)  
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All of which will influence the upcoming CHC/BGI pay review(s) ??
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Old 8th Jun 2006, 14:57
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It Had better

As GMIA has just said it should influence the upcomming pay and conditions review of both CHC and Bristow. I hear Shell have recently announced the doubling of bonuses paid to workers in Warri just to keep them. Only Shell staff of course. The oil companies are aware of the problems of recruitment and retention and will pay but do the helicopter managemets have the guts to ask for more from them to keep us?
I am concerned that there will some pathetic offer of less than 10% which will be seen as an insult. Stand by for the rush for one way tickets.
It is only a matter of time before the helicopter kidnapping season starts. AGAIN!
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Old 8th Jun 2006, 15:22
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Swampie,

Why do hijackings and have to deal with the logistics of holding captives?

For PR purposes, ambushing the aircraft on the ground and destroying them would be much bigger news in the world's media.

If MEND is smart....which they seem to be from past activities....they will avoid harming ex-pats but destroy the oil industry ability to operate. The mere shortage of export oil harms both the world economy and the Nigerian government more than killing foreigners. No sense turning the world's opinion against MEND and the people in the Delta. Keep it focused upon the corrupt and inept Nigerian government where it belongs.

Take a moment and consider how you would operate an intelligence effort to determine flight schedules and procedures. Any Delta people involved in the scheduling, requesting of flights? Any reason why MEND cannot penetrate the oil company ranks and get that kind of assistance?
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Old 8th Jun 2006, 15:51
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Instead of spending the money on what appears to be a futile attempt to secure the pipeline and installations, give the money to MEND. MEND seems to have one card in it's deck and that is the "unfair distribution of oil revenue". Too simple?
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Old 8th Jun 2006, 17:41
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Instead of spending the money on what appears to be a futile attempt to secure the pipeline and installations, give the money to MEND. MEND seems to have one card in it's deck and that is the "unfair distribution of oil revenue". Too simple?
You can pay off a blackmailer. But you'll find they don't stay paid off. They'll be back for more.
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Old 8th Jun 2006, 20:12
  #820 (permalink)  

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Nigerian militants release South Korean hostages

Good news!!

Five South Korean energy workers have been released from captivity in Nigeria after being held hostage for more than 24 hours by separatist militants seeking the freedom of a jailed rebel leader.

The militants known as the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) said they had released the South Koreans at the request of Mujahid Asari Dokubo, a jailed separatist leader whose freedom the MEND was demanding.

"In fulfilment of our earlier pledge, all five Korean prisoners captured by our unit in the attack on the Daewoo camp were released ... today," MEND said in a statement.

It said the South Koreans had been handed over to Nigerian Senator David Brigidi, who confirmed that he had received the men "on the road between Port Harcourt and Bukuma" and was taking them to government house in Port Harcourt.

Police and industry sources also confirmed the release of the hostages.

The workers, staff of South Korean firms Daewoo and Korea Gas Corp, were snatched from a gas plant in southern Nigeria on Wednesday morning (local time) in response to a court decision to deny bail to Niger Delta guerrilla leader Asari.

MEND had said on Thursday that it was prepared to release the hostages in exchange for the freeing of Asari, head of the outlawed Niger Delta People's Volunteer Force (NDPVF), who is standing trial for treason in Abuja.
Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems...6/s1658959.htm
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