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Canada: Training & Employment prospects

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Canada: Training & Employment prospects

Old 11th Jan 1999, 01:22
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hawkeye9277
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Canada: Training & Employment prospects

UK military rotary pilot would appreciate assistance/advice on best way to obtain licence for relocation and employment as helicopter pilot in Canada. currently have about 3000 hours but no licence of any category.
 
Old 11th Jan 1999, 20:12
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Hover
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MaxNr is the man to talk to. There are IFR medevac positions available in Canada, and there never seems to be enough IFR guys to go around, especially if you don't mind sitting co-joe for a spell. If you have the hours, moving up is generally quick. You can probally make better money in the bush but the work is generally cyclic, and if you have a military background, IFR is the way to go, and your past experience will be most appreciated in this enviroment. Good luck.
 
Old 12th Jan 1999, 04:53
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MaxNr
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Hi Hawkeye9277,
I`m an ex-RN pilot and moved to Canada about 2 years ago and loving it...The path to moving over here is quite long and twisty, however, drop me an e-mail and I`ll gladly help as best I can....you won`t regret the move, I promise!!!
[email protected]
 
Old 3rd Dec 2000, 01:22
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Countdown
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Cool Employment in Canada

What are the prospects of being employed as a UK pilot in Canada.Feedback please.
 
Old 3rd Dec 2000, 08:27
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tech
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Countdown: Employment in Canada should be quite easy providing that you have a minimum
of 1000 hours for VFR work / or alternatively 500 hours and an IFR with the ATP exams written, and of course convert your licences to Canadian. I have worked with pilots who have come from vertually every-where and they have not had a problem with immigration. It's to bad that Europe wasn't as free towards Canadians,
Best of Luck.

 
Old 3rd Dec 2000, 08:56
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paco
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It's certainly a lot easier than it used to be (I know one who lives in France and works here), but be aware that the industry is highly seasonal - contractors tend to get hired between the end of May and the beginning of October, depending on the work and the company, plus the heliskiing season.

In general, if you go to the West, you need a mountain course, if you go to the East, you need an IR (though this requirement is not so strict), and you have to make it as easy as possible for the employers because they are lazy buggers - they expect you to have every rating on your licence that they will possibly need for the next five years, i.e. they do almost no work at all! 206 is good, AStar is better if you can do it. I have found that virtually no sponsorship is offered, even if they are desperate - Canadian, I know, need some IR rated guys, in the east at any rate.

I can see their point to a certain extent, as pilots move on very quickly, especially after getting a lot of training under their belt. If any type ratings are offered, the younger guys get them in lieu of wages or prospects.

You really do need to get around and meet people - I know it's a big place, but sending resumes is no good at all, since they tend to read them only when you turn up and force them to anyway.

Still, not to be too pessimistic - if you can stand the management, the guys you work with are the best and you will end up as a better pilot after time over here.

cheers

phil
 
Old 3rd Dec 2000, 18:39
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offshoreigor
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Cool

Countdown;

I know we have not always seen eye to eye on topics, but this is one subject I am intimately familiar with. I also don't like seeing advice from bitter or inexperienced people taken as the gospel (re:Paco).

If I am correct in my estimate of your background, you are a mid to high time Offshore Captain with more than just a little experience. If this is so, then you are definately suited for Canadian employment.

Although the previous reply refers to 206 or A-Star, although useful for seasonal employment with a limited income, definately not condusive to a solid retirement plan.

If you have S-61 or Puma, there is a requirement in Halifax, Nova Scotia for crews on the offshore projects there. If you have S-76 or BH 212, there are ample opportunities overseas with CHC International.

If you are ultimately looking to emigrate to Canada, then Halifax would be a good bet. The salary ranges from $60-75K (CAD) I know that seems much lower than the North Sea rate, but the cost of living is much lower and if you have saved up some of those North Sea bucks, then you would definately have a fairly easy go of it over here. We have employed several UK Pilots (RN and North Sea) and they have had no complaints.

Hope this helps.

Cheers, OffshoreIgor



[This message has been edited by offshoreigor (edited 03 December 2000).]
 
Old 3rd Dec 2000, 18:58
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Countdown
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I am most appreciative of your responses guys and will take it onboard and mull it over.I see from the immigration side that you have to have capital is this true or can you get round this.
 
Old 4th Dec 2000, 03:49
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offshoreigor
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Countdown;

If you have a sponsor, then the capital resources are not required. If you are going it alone, you must show proof of the resources to return from whence you came, ie, a return ticket home.

You can get all the immigration info from External Affairs Canada, either on the web or through the Canadian Embassy in London, (or consulate in Edinburgh).

I think Canada is still very receptive to UK citizens immigrating.

Cheers, OffshoreIgor


[This message has been edited by offshoreigor (edited 03 December 2000).]
 
Old 4th Dec 2000, 21:32
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Thomas coupling
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Exclamation

Be advised, to make sure the immigration dept know you are serious, they will charge you a non refundable fee of about 300 (ish). 'Cos every tom dick and harry wants to live over there, initially, but change their minds when they don't have anything to offer, thus overloading the imm' dept!

You won't meet nicer people.....




------------------
TC
 
Old 5th Dec 2000, 02:44
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Countdown
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Red face

Offshoreigor, 4rvibes,and the ones i havnt mentioned
guys thanks for your help any other info would be much appreciated, but to the two I have mentioned by names my bark is much worse than my bite .
Keep up the good work.
Cheers and fly safely.
 
Old 8th Dec 2000, 06:36
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paco
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Hmm, dunno about bitter and experienced, but we are obviously on two completely different sides of the industry (i.e. muddy boots or wet feet) with different rules.

I think you'll find my comments are quite valid, though.

It was only recently, BTW, that pilots were added to the list of desired occupations, or rather, the classifications were virtually done away with, once the government realised there were not enough people paying taxes.

One tip I can pass on about immigration is that the process itself is part of the test (just like the British pilot exams), in that they expect to see some commitment on your part, so don't get discouraged!

Phil

 
Old 13th Dec 2000, 23:16
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Lu Zuckerman
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To: Countdown

Much has been said about emmigrating to Canada including fees and having necessary funds and a return ticket. I don't know if you are seeking citizenship, landed immigrant status or, permanent resident status. I can't speak for the first two but I can for the third option.

I am a US Citizen seeking Permanent resident status. My Canadian wife and I started the procedure three years ago and so far it has cost us over $10,000 CDN and I am no closer now than I was a year ago. It is possible to handle all of the paper work yourself but we chose to go through an Immigration Consultant. Give this a great deal of thought.

------------------
The Cat

[This message has been edited by Lu Zuckerman (edited 14 December 2000).]
 
Old 18th Dec 2000, 00:39
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Hogfather
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Talking

To Countdown.

I have just completed the immigration process. It takes about 2 to 3 months to gather all the information you require to submit the application depending on how many joobs you have had and places you have lived in since you were 18. After I submitted the application it took only 5 weeks.

There are a lot of hidden exspenses such as medicals, police certificates and authentication of your qualifications etc. It has cost me around 1000 so far. It was cheaper for me since my family are all Canadian. You can expect to pay the same for each dependant.

They seem to have dropped the Official Job List now and it is mainly based on your educational/qualification level. Age is also important. Over 45 then forget it unless you are loaded.

There is no real need to use an agent to help you complete the immigration proceedure. It is fairly straight forward if not time consuming. Check out the immigration web sight at www.canada.org.uk/visa-info

I found that very few companies even bothered to reply to my lettesr etc until I could confirm I had a visa.
 
Old 29th Dec 2000, 16:06
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Dougie Reid
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Post Flying in Canada?

Currently resident in the uk, (ex-military) and looking at the possibilities of gaining employment across the pond. Can anybody who has already been thru the mill give me a 1-10 difficulty rating and/or any Top Tips on the ease of getting in on the flying act ovet there...
I hold a UKCPL(H), Frozen ATPL(H) and have hours totalling 1200 (inc 1000TT/250PIC). Any info would be most appreciated. Happy 2001 to all that I know, Yours Aye, Dougie

[This message has been edited by Dougie Reid (edited 29 December 2000).]

[This message has been edited by Dougie Reid (edited 29 December 2000).]
 
Old 31st Dec 2000, 05:17
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hover lover
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Hello There,
Your query about what kind of hoops you need to jump through + what kind of paperwork you need to have in order to work in North America has been answered several times. Actually your query almost rates as a FAQ.
I don't know if you are looking for opportunities in Canada or the USA.
Warning: be prepared for some rude messages from regular posters to the board. Some guys will help you out, while some guys will tell you to stay home. Best of Luck to You!!
 
Old 1st Jan 2001, 12:53
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Randy_g
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Dougie, first you will need to convert your licence to a Cdn one. To find the info on converting your licence try:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/aviation/regserv.../doc/index.htm

This site is where the Cdn. air regs live online.

You will then need to get a work visa. For info on that go to the Cdn immgration website:

http://www.cic.gc.ca

If you are looking for ifr type work, and
I'll assume you have multi-ifr time, my recommendation would be to talk to someone like offshoreigor (he hangs out in here) for some contacts at CHC International. They are world-wide and would be good to try first.

If you're looking for vfr work, you can find any kind of challenge you are looking for. The work can be seasonal, and based on the forestry, and resource sectors. With 1000+ hrs. you shouldn't have too many problems finding work; after you get your visa, and licence stuff straightened out.

Oh btw, if you can, try to time your arrival in early spring. (late feb, or early march)

Cheers, and good luck !!

Randy_G

If you can't stand the heat...

then turn up the air conditioner !!!

[This message has been edited by Randy_g (edited 01 January 2001).]
 
Old 1st Jan 2001, 20:21
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MightyGem
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Cool

Dougie, if, as I think, you are ex 653 you may know Phil (Taff) Howarth. If you can get a contact for him from anyone, he emigrated to Canada in 2000.

Regards Dave
 
Old 3rd Jan 2001, 00:53
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paco
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Hi Dougie- If you email me I can give you Phil Haworth's Number - he lives round the corner from me in Alberta. I can also pass on a couple of tips about getting in.

Cheers & HNY

Phil Croucher
www.electrocution.com

(ex Beaver/651 Sqn)
 
Old 5th Jan 2001, 02:54
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Cadfael
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If it is of any help. The requirements to get the Canadian CPL (I hold UK ATP, Oz ATP etc)was to 1. Sit ALL the exams again at TC's office in downtown Hong-Couver 2. Flight test with approved examiner at local flight school. 3. New medical. 4. Audiogram.

TC only recognised helicopter types flown in last 12 months. For ATP(H) 2 additional exams were required. Talk to heli-college in Langley or someone similar to get the latest prices Hope this helps some.
 

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