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UK to leave EASA by end of 2020

Old 7th Mar 2020, 17:28
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UK to leave EASA by end of 2020

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51783580

Thought a lot of you would be interested in this. Personally, I think this will be a massive headache for a lot of airlines and FTO's in terms of licence issue etc, but time will tell.

Would be great to hear your thoughts on this move...
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 17:36
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Oh Great ! What does this mean for people starting out on ATPL training ? Where do we sit our ATPLs Austro, IAA or UK CAA ?? Be intersting to see how this all plays out but for people who have started training I would say its a bit of a worry
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 17:42
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Originally Posted by ATIS31 View Post
Oh Great ! What does this mean for people starting out on ATPL training ? Where do we sit our ATPLs Austro, IAA or UK CAA ?? Be intersting to see how this all plays out but for people who have started training I would say its a bit of a worry
Yeah it will create a lot of uncertainty in what licence state cadets' qualifications will be issued in. I would suspect UK FTO's have thought about this in their Brexit plans, and there may be things in-place.
In effect, I presume UK cadets and pilots with this new state of licence issue, will be treated like non-EU cadets and pilots. Airlines who only accept those with EASA licences will no doubt have to change their requirements, as I definitely can't see them making all UK cadets and pilots exempt from their company; or if they do, well you see can see the massive problem there...
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 17:50
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There's a growing list of ATO/AeMC approvals that EASA will issue after the end of the transition period. See downloads on https://www.easa.europa.eu/easa-and-...anisations-ato
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 17:51
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Originally Posted by LeoBruce123 View Post
Yeah it will create a lot of uncertainty in what licence state cadets' qualifications will be issued in. I would suspect UK FTO's have thought about this in their Brexit plans, and there may be things in-place.
In effect, I presume UK cadets and pilots with this new state of licence issue, will be treated like non-EU cadets and pilots. Airlines who only accept those with EASA licences will no doubt have to change their requirements, as I definitely can't see them making all UK cadets and pilots exempt from their company; or if they do, well you see can see the massive problem there...
I would reconsider your doubts, as UK license holders will only be able to fly G registered airplanes.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 18:01
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Im not too sure how I feel about this with regards to the future, I see both sides of the argument.

I am currently studying for AustroControl ATPL Exams at BGS. I am an English pilot with an (EASA) Irish PPL & Class 1 medical and will probably be finishing my training (MEIR/CPL & APS MCC) after the transition period with EASA ends. Now, my predicament is that I had a UK class 2 medical 2 years before I started my training and the CAA refused to lift a restriction on my medical. Instead of fighting my corner, I transferred my records to the IAA who lifted my restriction and I then gained a Class 1 over in Dublin in November 2019. Now Im pretty nervous that if I have to try and covert my licenses back to the UK (because of brexit) after my training for employment purposes then the CAA will put a restriction on my records again. Do the CAA keep a record of your records even though you go through the SOLI transfer process?

Can anyone offer their thoughts/advice? Has anyone been through this process before or can relate to it?
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 18:17
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Originally Posted by bulldog89 View Post
I would reconsider your doubts, as UK license holders will only be able to fly G registered airplanes.
May also mean European licence holders may not be able to fly G registered without converting theirs too....
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 18:41
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Originally Posted by VinRouge View Post
May also mean European licence holders may not be able to fly G registered without converting theirs too....
For sure it will, it works both ways.

I also have to say that after the sad end of Flybe restricting UK license holders to G regs will be a positive thing for EASA pilots, unless they all convert their licenses. That seems highly improbable at the moment as they still don't know if they'll be able to work in the EU...remember that hard Brexit means no more English pilots based in the EU.
I don't know about your country, but that would create A LOT of vacancies in Italy, both in easyJet and Ryan.

But don't worry, the virus will **** everything up for everyone and we'll all end up being in the same boat.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 19:02
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Guess what market provides more job opportunities? A market of 450 against 65 Million!...It will also be interesting to see what the likes of Easy and Ryanair think about their crews not being interchangeable??The more pressing question however will be how an organisation that has given most of its regulatory and administrative competence away will be able to replace the same within a couple of months?! But I guess it will be as easy as trying to employ and train 50000 new customs officers in the face the new border/trading arrangements come 2021...In the mind of a politician however this can all be pulled out of a hat...
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 19:22
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Originally Posted by LeoBruce123 View Post
Yeah it will create a lot of uncertainty in what licence state cadets' qualifications will be issued in. I would suspect UK FTO's have thought about this in their Brexit plans, and there may be things in-place.
In effect, I presume UK cadets and pilots with this new state of licence issue, will be treated like non-EU cadets and pilots. Airlines who only accept those with EASA licences will no doubt have to change their requirements, as I definitely can't see them making all UK cadets and pilots exempt from their company; or if they do, well you see can see the massive problem there...
EU based airlines will keep flying without Nigels in the pointy end.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 19:34
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this idea is simply dumb, there is no other way to look at it, costs are going to rise, not all things EU wise are bad, it's very insular thinking of grant and co.

Fats
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 19:59
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Originally Posted by Mcflyer101 View Post
...It will also be interesting to see what the likes of Easy and Ryanair think about their crews not being interchangeable??...
It will become possible to hold both a UK license and any other European country's licence, which is not possible right now.

Originally Posted by Mcflyer101 View Post
...The more pressing question however will be how an organisation that has given most of its regulatory and administrative competence away will be able to replace the same within a couple of months?! ...
From Aviation Week:
We will leave EASA, Shapps said Mar. 6 during an exclusive interview with editors from Aviation Week Network. A lot of the expertise they have is UK expertise, in fact. A lot of the key leading lights were Brits.
and
So, the powers will revert to the CAA, who are probably one of the worlds leading regulators and the expertise will need to come home to do that, but well do it in a gradual way, Shapps said.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 20:33
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Lot of people have already converted their licence to other EASA member states, and there's plenty of time till 2021.
Of course UK caa will become overcrowded for this reason very soon.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 20:36
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Still many things have to be agreed upon till the 31st December, and ability to work in EU is one of them.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 20:40
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[QUOTE=NoelEvans;10706109]It will become possible to hold both a UK license and any other European country's licence, which is not possible right now.

Negative. To hold a UK and EASA license will be as much possible as holding a FAA and/or Canadian ATPL...Hence by passing all exams and maybe having ratings/flight hours credited...In regards to all other quotes of the minister: They are the usual self aggrandising hollow phrases. Normally promoted ad nauseam by very mediocre personalities who wrap themselves up in a flag...The reality is that whole regulatory departments within the CAA have been outsourced to a European wide Institution. To believe these can be recreated out of thin air or rubber stamped is naive to extreme.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 20:42
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Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
Still many things have to be agreed upon till the 31st December, and ability to work in EU is one of them.
That's something they're giving as granted, don't know why.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 20:51
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Because Brits think they're entitled to that
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 21:20
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Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
Because Brits think they're entitled to that
Yep, been following that line of thought and some of the comments with some interest.

Post Brexit proper as a Brit there will be more to getting a job on the "continent" than simply having a EASA licence.


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Old 7th Mar 2020, 21:54
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Well i guess soon Airbus will be shutting down factories in the UK and moving the production to Europe 😀
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Old 8th Mar 2020, 11:11
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Unhappy Toys

Originally Posted by Jetavia View Post
Well i guess soon Airbus will be shutting down factories in the UK and moving the production to Europe 😀
No change there then
Your not going to play with my toys!
The idea was good but as usual got lost in translation.
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