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Compare Robin R1180T Aiglon and the Piper Cherokee PA-28-180

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Compare Robin R1180T Aiglon and the Piper Cherokee PA-28-180

Old 2nd Feb 2022, 15:51
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Compare Robin R1180T Aiglon and the Piper Cherokee PA-28-180

Hi,

Is anybody able to compare the Robin R1180T Aiglon and the Piper Cherokee PA-28-180 with respect to (mainly) its following flight characteristics:

Approach and landing (rate of sink, flare, etc)
Lateral control generally
Stalling characteristics

I'm interested to know how the aircraft compare in the training role.

Cheers,
PM
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Old 3rd Feb 2022, 05:35
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Apart from a flight as a passenger I have no time in Robin aircraft so canít help you there.
Quick Wikipedia search shows that of this particular model only 67 were built since 1977.
Begs the question why to consider it for training as parts may be hard to come by.
Except the Lycoming engine that is.
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Old 3rd Feb 2022, 15:18
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Thanks for your response.

My question is in the category of "design curiosity". These aircraft have very similar design characteristics. The Aiglon isn't FAA certified so I have no intention of buying an Aiglon but I do have Cherokee 180 flight experience. The only published flight test of the Aiglon that I've found is in French. It's quite a good flight test (I used Google to translate it). However, I'm curious to hear from anybody - preferably an experienced pilot - who has flown both aircraft and can compare the two solely from a flight characteristics point of view.
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Old 4th Feb 2022, 15:16
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Flew an 1180T some years ago. Iirc never new out than Cherokee, easier to get in and out. Handling was more positive and generally nicer all round than a cherokee. Don't recall stalls being anything interesting. Afraid I can't remember anything about performance but I liked it at the time.
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Old 4th Feb 2022, 18:00
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Thanks for your comments orthopod.


If anyone with Robin Aiglon experience would care to read the following about the Cherokee 180 and make a comparison, this would be useful to me.
It is an extract from an owners comment about the characteristics of the earlier 30-foot-wingspan Cherokee 180 (same wingspan and wing area as the Aiglon) during the approach and landing phase - with which I agree. The reference is from the following:

https://www.avweb.com/features/piper...-cherokee-180/

"The Hershey-bar wing has certain advantages and disadvantages. It feels solid in the air—much less kite-like than the Cessnas I was flying before—and it rides turbulence very nicely. In rough air it feels like a much larger airplane than it is. On the downside, it can be a bit of a groundlover when heavily loaded at high density altitude days, so I am planning on adding vortex generators.

At high altitude it doesn’t climb as quickly as I would expect given the power and weight. Hershey-bar Cherokees are known for their prodigious descent rate and the 180 is no exception. I actually like this quality as it makes doing a tight circuit with an approach at nearly any speed you like very easy. It’s easy to slip off any excess airspeed on final (being able to slip with full flaps is a nice change coming from flying 172s). Float is non-existent with the Cherokee. Keep in mind that if a Hershey-bar airplane floats at all you are coming in way too fast. When I observe others landing Cherokees, there seems to be a tendency to fly the approach too fast (probably out of fear of the sink rate). Fly a nice approach speed and the Cherokee will reward you with a precise, short landing every time. My exit on the runway I usually land on is 1800 feet from the threshold, and light braking is all that’s required to make the turn. Arrivals can be firm if the flare isn’t timed right and holding a touch of power right to touchdown can do a lot to smooth things out. A touch of power (sometimes a blast of power if sink rate on final is high) can really help with stabilator authority, which is sorely lacking at low speeds on these early birds".

Last edited by paulmadden707; 5th Feb 2022 at 13:38.
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Old 3rd Mar 2022, 00:14
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Looking back through my log book I have done quite a lot of check outs in the R1180, I recall that it was a nice aeroplane to fly and its only bad point was the French style seats that rotate backwards as you move the seat further back meaning the tall pilot also needs very long arms and you finish up look at the canopy. I regularly flew a PA28-180 at the same time and whilst the characteristics were very similar I think the 1180 felt nicer and better co-ordinated. Stall performance of both was benign, I did spin the 180 a few times but it was rather reluctant to spin. Landing the 1180 was precise but then if you fly the correct speed both aircraft will land correctly. I think the 1180 was a little reluctant to leave the ground at max auw especially on grass. If I wanted to go somewhere and had the choice I would have taken the 1180 any day. If I wanted to instruct a student I would have taken the 180.
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Old 3rd Mar 2022, 21:05
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Thank you very much for your concise comparison. Your knowledgeable response is much appreciated.
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Old 4th Mar 2022, 10:09
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Our whole runway is barely more than 1800 feet!
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